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Offering Page Instructions

We update our offerings page with current information regularly and almost daily. With this direct-from-source information you can accurately choose, plan, and order your own coffee selections. Here's further explanation on what the columns of our offerings sheet mean:

OPEN:  coffee has NOT been shipped  from origin; delivery column shows scheduled shipment  month

AFLOAT: coffee has been shipped from  origin; ETA column shows estimated arrival date to U.S.  port.

Location Key:The following status indicators may be listed in the location column:  

  • Cafe Imports Fulfillment,  LLC:  coffee is in our warehouse in St Paul and  available for delivery.
  • Continental  Terminals:  coffee is in Continental in New Jersey and  available for delivery.
  • The  Annex:  coffee is in The Annex, San Leandro, California  and available for delivery.
  • Bruni  Intl:  coffee is in Bruni Intl in Laredo, TX and  available for delivery.
  • Olympia  Intl:  coffee is in Olympia Intl in Laredo, TX and  available for delivery.
  • CLEARING:  coffee has arrived at  destination port, but pending Customs and/or FDA  clearance.
  • St Paul,  MN:  coffee has arrived at the railyard in St Paul;  3-5 days for arrival to our warehouse
  • Laredo,  TX:  Coffee has crossed the border from Mexico; 5-7  days for arrival into our warehouse.
  • Houston: coffee has arrived in the port  of Houston; 7-10 days for arrival to our warehouse.
  • Newark,  NJ:  coffee has arrive in the port of New Jersey;  7-10 days for arrival to our warehouse.
  • IN  TRANSIT--USA:  coffee is in transit to Cafe Imports and should  arrive in 3-5 days.
  • IN TRANSIT--Continental  Terminals:  coffee is in transit to Continental in New  Jersey and should arrive in 3-5 days.
  • CUSTOMS  HOLD:  coffee has been placed on hold by U.S. customs,  pending exam.  Add 5-10 days to transit time.
  • All transit times are  estimates.

Origin: The country from which the coffee originates.

Grade: The specifics of the coffee, let it be organic, natural, 18 screen, etc. Some of these are ambiguous, but further details can be obtained by looking at the next column, "Name".

Name: The name of the farm, mill, cooperative, etc.

ID: Our internal identification number for this particular lot of coffee.

Origin Grade Name ID Bag Size Bags Avail Location More Info Location Dictionary Notes
Brazil Carmo de Minas Sertão Farm - Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7177 60kg 70 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP’S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group’s activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION • To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; • To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; • To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; • Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES • Family • Ethics • Transparency • Credibility • Professionalism • Humility • Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region’s economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location:Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude:22º 05' 59" Longitude:45º 11' 27" Altitude:From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall:1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature:18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles)
Brazil Carmo de Minas Sertão Farm - Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7178 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP’S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group’s activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION • To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; • To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; • To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; • Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES • Family • Ethics • Transparency • Credibility • Professionalism • Humility • Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region’s economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location:Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude:22º 05' 59" Longitude:45º 11' 27" Altitude:From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall:1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature:18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles)
Brazil Carmo de Minas I.P. Farm - Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7179 60kg 60 OPEN origin *Formerly known as Fazenda Serrado, the Iamas Pereira (I.P) namechange is an attempt to differentiate the Farm name from being confused with the Cerrado coffee Region. Pereira Estate is perched in the high mountains of the South Minas Water Spa Circuit, near the towns of Lambari, Carmo de Minas and São Lourenço. The 300 acres of Pereira Estate bring together all the fundamental requirements for the production of great coffees: altitude, climate and personal dedication. The 250 acres cultivated with the Bourbon, Acaiá, Mundo Novo, Catuaí and Catucaí varieties are planted in fertile mountain soil at altitudes ranging between 3,500 and 4,000 feet. The high altitude favors a slow ripening of cherries and permits selective picking which are decisive factors to produce coffees of exceptional quality.The day-to-day attention to detail of the Pereira Family leaves its personal mark on the coffees produced by Pereira Estate. Their coffee beans are gaining widespread international recognition for their exceptional quality. In 2002 Pereira Estate was one of the winners in the Cup of Excellence coffee quality competition.
Brazil Carmo de Minas Furnas Farm - Yellow Catuai (GrainPro) 7180 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Carmo de Minas Floresta Farm - Yellow Catuai (GrainPro) 7181 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil
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Decaf Farm Select Decaf - Non FT or Org Yellow Bourbon Estate Mogiana - MWP 7078 69kg 67 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC   minnesota-us
Brazil Decaf Farm Select Decaf - Non FT or Org Yellow Bourbon Estate Mogiana - MWP 7437 69kg 67 OPEN   origin
Brazil
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Decaf Origin Select Decaf - Non FT or Org Serra Negra - MWP 7079 69kg 199 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC   minnesota-us
Brazil Decaf Origin Select Decaf - Non FT or Org Serra Negra - MWP 7438 69kg 199 OPEN   origin
Brazil
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Microlot Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Santa Ines Farm (GrainPro) 6121 60kg 117 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Soft and smooth with chocolate, lemon and green grape. Soft and smooth with chocolate, lemon and green grape. History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil
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Microlot Carmo de Minas - Natural - Santa Lucia Farm (GrainPro) 6786 60kg 2 Eniti Limited UK london-eu History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program. Fazenda Santa Lucia 83 out of 740 hectares of this farm are in Coffee. 9 in Yellow Bourbon, 18 in Catuai, 18 in Acaia and 25 in Mundo Novo. Current production is about 2800 bags, of which; 1260 are Pulped Natural and 1540 are Natural. This farm is a model of the region and is inovating in both quality and proper production methods with hopes of producing 4500 bags in the future.
Brazil
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Microlot Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural- Sertao Farm (GrainPro) 7097 60kg 68 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Complex, soft and heavy with honey, winey fruit and floral flavors. Complex, soft and heavy with honey, winey fruit and floral flavors. History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP’S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group’s activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION • To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; • To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; • To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; • Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES • Family • Ethics • Transparency • Credibility • Professionalism • Humility • Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region’s economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location:Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude:22º 05' 59" Longitude:45º 11' 27" Altitude:From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall:1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature:18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles)
Brazil
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Microlot 1 CoE Lot # 4 - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Santa Barbara (VacPack) 7149 30kg 31 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Rich, creamy and soft with a floral nose, buttery mouthfeel, winey acidity and cherry and root beer flavors.
Brazil
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Mogiana Natural Yellow Bourbon - Sertaozinho Farm (GrainPro) 6662 60kg 120 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Creamy with toffee, cherry, sour orange and malic acidity. Creamy with toffee, cherry, sour orange and malic acidity. José Renato Gonçalves Dias manages the Fazenda Sertaozinho in an ecological manner with the objective of preserving the life of the fertile soil for years to come. Every step from planting to drying is all done by hand. This process allows for a selective harvest by only hand-picking the ripe cherries. Such care shows in the cup! Brazil produces about 1/3 of the total world coffee production hence the importance in the global setting. A record harvest will make the coffee market tank while a significant frost will make it rally. This is one of my favorite origins to visit and it is very different than most. The food is great, there is modern infrastructure, and the Euro-Latin vibe is awesome! Brazilian coffee can be a significant component in a roaster’s menu specially if they use it in their espresso blend. Traditionally, most espresso recipes have included Brazil due to its characteristics: low acidity, high body, creamy, caramel, and chocolate notes, with a significant amount of sweetness. The Yellow Bourbon coffees come from Mogiana region in the state of Minas Gerais, one of Brazil’s most important coffee regions. They are estate specific coffees from farms which have made it numerous times into the Cup of Excellence auction. These coffees will be a step-up from your traditional Brazilian profile. In the cup:higher citric acidity, fruit and chocolate notes, and more sweetness which will produce complex cups and espresso. -Piero Cristiani
Brazil Mogiana Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7311 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7312 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7313 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7314 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7315 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7316 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7317 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7318 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7319 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7320 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7321 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7322 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7323 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7324 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7325 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7326 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7327 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana Natural Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7328 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Brazil Mogiana 1 Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon - Fazenda Sertaozinho (GrainPro) 7308 60kg 80 AFLOAT afloat Soft toffee and nutty flavors with lemon acidity. Soft toffee and nutty flavors with lemon acidity. José Renato Gonçalves Dias manages the Fazenda Sertaozinho in an ecological manner with the objective of preserving the life of the fertile soil for years to come. Every step from planting to drying is all done by hand. This process allows for a selective harvest by only hand-picking the ripe cherries. Such care shows in the cup! Brazil produces about 1/3 of the total world coffee production hence the importance in the global setting. A record harvest will make the coffee market tank while a significant frost will make it rally. This is one of my favorite origins to visit and it is very different than most. The food is great, there is modern infrastructure, and the Euro-Latin vibe is awesome! Brazilian coffee can be a significant component in a roaster’s menu specially if they use it in their espresso blend. Traditionally, most espresso recipes have included Brazil due to its characteristics: low acidity, high body, creamy, caramel, and chocolate notes, with a significant amount of sweetness. The Yellow Bourbon coffees come from Mogiana region in the state of Minas Gerais, one of Brazil’s most important coffee regions. They are estate specific coffees from farms which have made it numerous times into the Cup of Excellence auction. These coffees will be a step-up from your traditional Brazilian profile. In the cup:higher citric acidity, fruit and chocolate notes, and more sweetness which will produce complex cups and espresso. -Piero Cristiani
Brazil Mogiana 1 Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon - Fazenda Cachoeira da Gramma (GrainPro) 7310 60kg 220 AFLOAT afloat Chocolate and raisin with a nutty aftertaste. Chocolate and raisin with a nutty aftertaste. This farm is ownedby the Carvalho Family. Farm size: 411 total area, 97 in coffee plantation. Annual production: 4000 bags Certification: UTZ certified, RA certified 2012 Other Products: eucalyptus Avg # of employees: 27 full time, 40 seasonal. They have schools here for the children from all thefarms. 300 children total. Part from the government part from the farmers for payment for theteachers. Avg rainfall: 2000 mm Avg Temp: 19.2 C Soil: Volcanic Soil, rich in potassium Avg Tree Age: 20 years old, oldest planted in 1956 This farm is managed by Bourbon Specialty and highly organized. The valley that this farm is home tomany of the premiere coffee farms in Brasil. Bourbon specialty manages 48 farms. The Valle deGama is incredibly beautiful with large rolling hills surrounding the farm. People that work here are extremely happy and well taken care of. Quality of life is excellent. Coffee production hence the importance in the global setting. A record harvest will make the coffee market tank while a significant frost will make it rally. This is one of my favorite origins to visit and it is very different than most. The food is great, there is modern infrastructure, and the Euro-Latin vibe is awesome! Brazilian coffee can be a significant component in a roaster’s menu specially if they use it in their espresso blend. Traditionally, most espresso recipes have included Brazil due to its characteristics: low acidity, high body, creamy, caramel, and chocolate notes, with a significant amount of sweetness. The Yellow Bourbon coffees come from Mogiana region in the state of Minas Gerais, one of Brazil’s most important coffee regions. They are estate specific coffees from farms which have made it numerous times into the Cup of Excellence auction. These coffees will be a step-up from your traditional Brazilian profile. In the cup:higher citric acidity, fruit and chocolate notes, and more sweetness which will produce complex cups and espresso.
Brazil
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Natural 17/18 SS FC Amizade 5477 60kg 19 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Bakers chocolate, lemon and soy nut.
Brazil
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Natural 17/18 SS FC Amizade 7092 60kg 19 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Nutty, cocoa.
Brazil Natural 17/18 SS FC Amizade 7195 60kg 80 OPEN   origin
Brazil Natural 17/18 SS FC Amizade 7196 60kg 75 OPEN   origin
Brazil
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Natural 17/18 SS FC   7306 60kg 130 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric and soy nut.
Brazil
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Natural 2/3 SS   7305 60kg 13 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric with peanut.
Brazil Serra Negra   7058 60kg 94 AFLOAT afloat Peanut, chocolate, and citric acidity.
Brazil Serra Negra   7059 60kg 74 AFLOAT afloat Peanut, herbal, and citric.
Brazil
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Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Natural - Santa Ines Farm (GrainPro) 6114 60kg 49 CALM Melbourne melbourne-au Dark chocolate, pear, caramel, lemon curd Dark chocolate, pear, caramel, lemon curd History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil
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Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Santa Ines Farm (GrainPro) 6117 60kg 207 CALM Melbourne melbourne-au History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Irmas Pereira (GrainPro) 7345 60kg 65 AFLOAT afloat citric with chocolate, toffee and lemon. citric with chocolate, toffee and lemon. *Formerly known as Fazenda Serrado, the Iamas Pereira (I.P) namechange is an attempt to differentiate the Farm name from being confused with the Cerrado coffee Region. Pereira Estate is perched in the high mountains of the South Minas Water Spa Circuit, near the towns of Lambari, Carmo de Minas and São Lourenço. The 300 acres of Pereira Estate bring together all the fundamental requirements for the production of great coffees: altitude, climate and personal dedication. The 250 acres cultivated with the Bourbon, Acaiá, Mundo Novo, Catuaí and Catucaí varieties are planted in fertile mountain soil at altitudes ranging between 3,500 and 4,000 feet. The high altitude favors a slow ripening of cherries and permits selective picking which are decisive factors to produce coffees of exceptional quality.The day-to-day attention to detail of the Pereira Family leaves its personal mark on the coffees produced by Pereira Estate. Their coffee beans are gaining widespread international recognition for their exceptional quality. In 2002 Pereira Estate was one of the winners in the Cup of Excellence coffee quality competition.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Santa Ines (GrainPro) 7348 60kg 90 OPEN origin Almond, walnut and mild fruit with citric acidity. Almond, walnut and mild fruit with citric acidity. History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Natural - Fazenda Santa Ines (GrainPro) 7354 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Natural - Fazenda Santa Ines (GrainPro) 7355 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Natural - Fazenda Santa Ines (GrainPro) 7356 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Natural - Fazenda Santa Ines (GrainPro) 7357 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Santa Ines (GrainPro) 7358 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Santa Ines (GrainPro) 7359 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Santa Ines (GrainPro) 7360 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Santa Ines (GrainPro) 7361 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Santa Lucia (GrainPro) 7362 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Santa Lucia (GrainPro) 7363 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Santa Lucia (GrainPro) 7364 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Santa Lucia (GrainPro) 7365 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP'S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group's activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES Family Ethics Transparency Credibility Professionalism Humility Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region's economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location: Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude: 22º 05' 59" Longitude: 45º 11' 27" Altitude: From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall: 1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature: 18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles) *Project CriaCarmo: As part of our partnership with Carmo Coffee, we are involved with a project called CriaCarmo, a program funding Swimming classes and Karate classes for youth in the Carmo de Minas area. The program started in July 2013 and was created by Jacques Pereira and Luiz Paulo of Carmo. Proceeds for CriaCarmo are raised from Carmo coffee purchases, amounting to $7,500 in 2013 to help fund the program.
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Natural - Fazenda Sertao (GrainPro) 7366 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP’S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group’s activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION • To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; • To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; • To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; • Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES • Family • Ethics • Transparency • Credibility • Professionalism • Humility • Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region’s economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location:Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude:22º 05' 59" Longitude:45º 11' 27" Altitude:From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall:1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature:18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles)
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Natural - Fazenda Sertao (GrainPro) 7367 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP’S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group’s activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION • To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; • To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; • To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; • Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES • Family • Ethics • Transparency • Credibility • Professionalism • Humility • Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region’s economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location:Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude:22º 05' 59" Longitude:45º 11' 27" Altitude:From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall:1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature:18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles)
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Sertao (GrainPro) 7368 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP’S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group’s activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION • To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; • To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; • To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; • Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES • Family • Ethics • Transparency • Credibility • Professionalism • Humility • Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region’s economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location:Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude:22º 05' 59" Longitude:45º 11' 27" Altitude:From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall:1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature:18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles)
Brazil Spl Cat 100 Carmo de Minas - Pulped Natural - Fazenda Sertao (GrainPro) 7369 60kg 320 OPEN origin History of Carmo de Minas The 100 years of tradition in coffee-growing in Carmo de Minas, in southern Minas Gerais, are interlaced with the history of the Sertão Group / Carmo de Minas. The first cultivation of coffee in the region occurred at the Sertão Estate, which gives its name to the group. Inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira, and currently managed by their sons and in-laws, the estate is still part of the group, which also has other properties, including the Santa Inês and São Benedito estates and the São José farm. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. THE GROUP’S BUSINESS ACTIVITIES The Sertão Group is a family firm with more than 100 years of tradition in the production and commercialization of high-quality coffee. The Sertão Estate, located in Carmo de Minas, South Minas Gerais, was inherited by José Isidro Pereira and Nazareth Dias Pereira and is now managed by their sons and in-laws. The region is well-known for its mineral water springs, perfect combination of latitude and altitude, mountainous terrain, well-defined seasons and fertile soil. The passion for work and coffee-growing and the favorable conditions found in South Minas have resulted in an expansion of group’s activities. The group now possesses a large area planted with coffee and a constantly evolving infrastructure that are capable of offering a wide variety of high quality arabica coffee to the domestic and international markets. In recent years, the Sertão Group has also been successfully engaging in the breeding and sale of girolando cattle and the cultivation and sale of corn and soybeans. Sertão has highly qualified technical assistance in each of its areas of activity, in order to improve continually the products it supplies and thus satisfy its customers. MISSION • To produce and commercialize high-quality coffee with specified grades suitable for the export market; • To become a national reference in the breeding of girolando cattle; • To produce and sell corn and soybeans with high quality standards; • Profitability, improvement in the quality of life of its collaborators, respect for legislation and the environment and a social contribution to a more just and egalitarian society. VISION To become a world reference in the agribusiness market in the next 5 years and significantly increase high-quality arabica exports with value added. VALUES • Family • Ethics • Transparency • Credibility • Professionalism • Humility • Determination REGION Renowned for its mineral water springs, the region of the Mantiqueira mountain range, where the Sertão Group is located, possesses a perfect combination of climate and land factors, with highly fertile soil that enable the production of fine coffee with typical characteristics, such as a full body and medium-to-high acidity, with a predominantly citric acidity. The region’s economy is based on agriculture and coffee is responsible for providing more than half the income and jobs. Location:Carmo de Minas, Mantiqueira mountain range, South Minas. Latitude:22º 05' 59" Longitude:45º 11' 27" Altitude:From 950 to 1,350 meters (3,100 to 4,400 feet) Average annual rainfall:1,850 mm (73 inches) Average temperature:18ºC Well-defined seasons Distances Carmo de Minas to São Paulo: 340km (210 miles) Carmo de Minas to Belo Horizonte: 383km (240 miles) Carmo de Minas to Rio de Janeiro: 290km (180 miles)
Brazil Spl Cat 200 Natural Mundo Novo - Pioneira (GrainPro) 7371 60kg 46 OPEN origin Peanut butter, chocolate and citric.
Brazil Spl Cat 200 Natural Acaia Cerrado - Buriti (GrainPro) 7372 60kg 118 OPEN origin Citric, toffee.
Brazil Spl Cat 200 Natural Acaia Cerrado - Buriti (GrainPro) 7373 60kg 139 OPEN origin Citric, honey peanut butter.
Brazil Spl Cat 200 Natural Acaia Cerrado - Pequi (GrainPro) 7374 60kg 255 OPEN origin Heavy, citric and nutty.
Brazil Spl Cat 200 Pulped Natural Yellow Catuai - Formoso (GrainPro) 7375 60kg 29 OPEN origin Heavy with cedar.
Brazil Spl Cat 200 Natural Acaia Cerrado - Buriti (GrainPro) 7376 60kg 53 OPEN origin Nutty and citric.
Brazil
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Spl Cat 400 Pulped Natural Yellow Bourbon - Rainha Farm (GrainPro) 5965 60kg 7 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric, peanut. Citric, peanut. For general Brazil pictures click here Brazil produces about 1/3 of the total world coffee production(including Arabica and Robusta)hence the importance in the global setting. A record harvest will make the coffee market tank while a significant frost will make it rally. This is one of my favorite origins to visit and it is very different than most. The food is great, there is modern infrastructure, and the Euro-Latin vibe is awesome! Brazilian coffee can be a significant component in a roaster’s menu specially if they use it in their espresso blend. Traditionally, most espresso recipes have included Brazil due to its characteristics: low acidity, high body, creamy, caramel, and chocolate notes, with a significant amount of sweetness. The Yellow Bourbon coffees come from Mogiana region in the state of Minas Gerais, one of Brazil’s most important coffee regions. They are estate specific coffees from farms which have made it numerous times into the Cup of Excellence auction. These coffees will be a step-up from your traditional Brazilian profile. In the cup: higher citric acidity, fruit and chocolate notes, and more sweetness which will produce complex cups and espresso. -Piero Cristiani
Burundi
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Microlot Mpanga (GrainPro) 6873 60kg 191 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us savory flavors with citric acidity. savory flavors with citric acidity. SEGEC ownsMpanga Washing Stationlocated a the Mpanga Hill, in the Kabuye zone in the Kayanza Province. 3,400 farmers are the suppliers of Mpanga Washing Station. Mpanga is equipped with 450 drying beds, six pulping machines and two pressers. Quality is present in all the productive chain. SEGEC encourages the producers giving them incentives if they harvest red and high quaility cherries. This is the starting point in the quality production of Mpanga. Coffee is fully washed and fermented. Once the coffee is fermented, it is pre-dried under shade in order to protect the coffee from the sun lights. After being pre-dried, the coffee is moved to drying beds located under the sun. Coffee is carefully dried and constantly moved to achieve a even dry process. The process of moving the coffee permits the parchment to stay intact, creating a beautifull parchment layer that is not damaged by the sunlights.
Burundi
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Microlot Kirema (GrainPro) 6874 60kg 214 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Savory, chocolate, burnt sugar and floral with intense acidity. Savory, chocolate, burnt sugar and floral with intense acidity. Read Jason's bloghere View picture albumhere In typical fashion of many of our favorite washing stations in Burundi, Kirema is in Kayanza. It is a small "cooperative", as around 1350 small farmers deliver cherry here. This is part of a Cafe Imports project where a quality premium is paid above the normal "market rate" and this premium is paid directly back to the farmers. - Jason
Burundi
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Microlot Bubezi (GrainPro) 6875 60kg 12 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Creamy with raw sugar, herb and intense tropical fruit flavor. Creamy with raw sugar, herb and intense tropical fruit flavor. SEGEC owns Mpanga Washing Station located a the Mpanga Hill, in the Kabuye zone in the Kayanza Province. Bubezi is a region within Kayanza and coffee is processed inMpanga Washing Station. 3,400 farmers are the suppliers of Mpanga Washing Station. Mpanga is equipped with 450 drying beds, six pulping machines and two pressers. Quality is present in all the productive chain. SEGEC encourages the producers giving them incentives if they harvest red and high quality cherries. This is the starting point in the quality production of Mpanga. Coffee is fully washed and fermented. Once the coffee is fermented, it is pre-dried under shade in order to protect the coffee from the sun lights. After being pre-dried, the coffee is moved to drying beds located under the sun. Coffee is carefully dried and constantly moved to achieve a even dry process. The process of moving the coffee permits the parchment to stay intact, creating a beautiful parchment layer that is not damaged by the sunlights.
Burundi
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Microlot Nyangwe (GrainPro) 6877 60kg 46 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Tart and creamy with caramel and florals. Tart and creamy with caramel and florals. SEGEC owns Mpanga Washing Stationlocated a the Mpanga Hill, in the Kabuye zone in the Kayanza Province. Nyangwe is a hill surronding Mpanga Washing Station. 3,400 farmers are the suppliers of Mpanga Washing Station. Mpanga is equipped with 450 drying beds, six pulping machines and two pressers. Quality is present in all the productive chain. SEGEC encourages the producers giving them incentives if they harvest red and high quaility cherries. This is the starting point in the quality production of Mpanga. Coffee is fully washed and fermented. Once the coffee is fermented, it is pre-dried under shade in order to protect the coffee from the sun lights. After being pre-dried, the coffee is moved to drying beds located under the sun. Coffee is carefully dried and constantly moved to achieve a even dry process. The process of moving the coffee permits the parchment to stay intact, creating a beautifull parchment layer that is not damaged by the sunlights.
Colombia
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D ACES Banexport - Las Nubes - Lauriña Variety (Innovation Bags) 6999 20kg 35 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Rich, syrupy body with dark chocolate and red fruit. Caramel and cashew aromatics. Rich, syrupy body with dark chocolate and red fruit. Caramel and cashew aromatics. *Lauriña is a naturally low caffeine content variety of arabica, at .6% compared to 1-1.2%. Get ready Europe! Cafe Imports, Finca Las Nubes, and Banexport have created an exclusive partnership to bring this amazing coffee to market from our European warehouse. We have three specific variety separations shipping from this harvest: Geisha, Rume Sudan, and Laurina We view this as an amazing opportunity to highlight variety specific attributes in the cup side by side. The attention to detail and processing techniques executed by Camilo and his staff at Finca Las Nubes are world class. We are seeing some of the most extreme examples of innovation at the farm level in Colombia. We are so excited for you to taste this coffee! Laurina is a Bourbon derivative originating from Reunion Island with a recessive gene mutation that gives it a dwarf-like habit, small leaves, small, pointed seeds and very low caffeine concentration: as low as 0.6% when compared to the 1.2% of Arabica and 2.2% found in Robusta.The Laurina is also parent to Mokka varieties, known for uniquely small beans and even more exotic flavors. Read this blog to learn more about our Variety Select program
Colombia
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D ACES Banexport - Las Nubes - Geisha Variety (Innovation Bags) 7001 20kg 44 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Intense, tangy, tartaric, and floral, with passionfruit, grape, and jasmine flavors. Intense, tangy, tartaric, and floral, with passionfruit, grape, and jasmine flavors. Get ready Europe! Cafe Imports, Finca Las Nubes, and Banexport have created an exclusive partnership to bring this amazing coffee to market from our European warehouse. We have three specific variety separations shipping from this harvest: Geisha, Rume Sudan, and Laurina We view this as an amazing opportunity to highlight variety specific attributes in the cup side by side. The attention to detail and processing techniques executed by Camilo and his staff at Finca Las Nubes are world class. We are seeing some of the most extreme examples of innovation at the farm level in Colombia. We are so excited for you to taste this coffee! Geisha: An Ethiopian descendent, Geisha had been trialed in Latin America since the mid 50's by researches seeking new means of disease resistance. Shelved for poor cup quality and yield due to being grown at too low of altitudes, the Geisha variety did not come to prominence until Price Peterson won the Best of Panama contest with it in 2006. In the decade since, the Geisha variety has ascended to the ranks of coffee variety superstardom. Geisha coffee typically offers a very floral cup with loads of citrus acidity. While Central American Geishas are commonly described as tea-like, with a lighter body and moderate sugar levels, those grown in Colombia frequently have a heavier mouthfeel and sweeter cup. Read this blog to learn more about our Variety Select project
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D ACES Banexport - Las Nubes - Rume Sudan Variety (Innovation Bags) 7002 20kg 36 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Clean, with notes of green tea, basil, and bergamot. Juicy acidity and buttery body. Clean, with notes of green tea, basil, and bergamot. Juicy acidity and buttery body. Get ready Europe! Cafe Imports, Finca Las Nubes, and Banexport have created an exclusive partnership to bring this amazing coffee to market from our European warehouse. We have three specific variety separations shipping from this harvest: Geisha, Rume Sudan, and Laurina We view this as an amazing opportunity to highlight variety specific attributes in the cup side by side. The attention to detail and processing techniques executed by Camilo and his staff at Finca Las Nubes are world class. We are seeing some of the most extreme examples of innovation at the farm level in Colombia. We are so excited for you to taste this coffee! Rume Sudan RS-510 was selected from the wild population on the Bome Plateau, in the Rume Valley of south east Sudan. Predating the extraction of Typica and Bourbon genetic material, the Sudanese (and Ethiopian) accessions draw on a much broader genetic pool than their more strenuously selected nieces and nephews. Rume Sudan has long interested genetic and hybrid development researchers due to the broader genetic base and disease resistance it offers, and continues to appear in new hybrids today. Low yields and small bean size have limited Rume Sudan's popularity with farmers, making it rare to find as a standalone variety. We're excited to be offering this interesting look into coffee's history... and it's future. Read this blog to learn more about our Variety Select project
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Decaf KVW MC Decaf - Non FT or Org Excelso EP 6898 60kg 6 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us citric, heavy and dark chocolate.
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Decaf KVW MC Decaf - Non FT or Org Excelso EP 7152 60kg 114 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Chocolate and nutty.
Colombia Decaf KVW MC Decaf - Non FT or Org Excelso EP 7197 60kg 186 OPEN   origin
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Decaf Origin Select Decaf - Non FT or Org Sugarcane E.A. - Cauca Caldono 6888 70kg 27 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Tangy citric and tartaric acidity, caramel, savory fruit, grapefruit and gingerbread. Tangy citric and tartaric acidity, caramel, savory fruit, grapefruit and gingerbread. This coffee is part of our "Origin Select Decaf" program.  We send small blended lots of high quality Colombian coffee to get decaffeinated by E.A. Sugarcane Alcohol locally in Colombia. The fact that this lot is sourced by us first, then sent to get decaffed, is a big differentiator in the world of decaf coffee; most is purchased "spot" without knowing the input product.   We hope you enjoy this industry leading decaf! See the rest of our Origin Select and Farm Select Decaf options, CLICK HERE
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E Banexport - Bertha Camayo (GrainPro) 6993 70kg 8 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Carmel, jasmine, tangy and creamy. Carmel, jasmine, tangy and creamy. Totoro is a town located in the Cauca Department. Bertha Camayo has a 5 hectares farm cultivated with Colombia and Castillo Varieties. She does a selective hand picking of the right cherries, where the quality of her coffee starts. Coffee is fermented for 12 to 24 hours on concrete tanks. Once the fermentation is done, the coffee is moved to a parabolic dryer where coffee remains for 10 to 20 days, depending on the weather.
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E Banexport - Carlos Rosalba Ordoñez (GrainPro) 6996 70kg 3 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Caramel, soft florals and cherry lemonade; tartaric acidity.
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E Banexport - Tolima 1983 (GrainPro) 7005 70kg 4 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Caramel, lime, red grape and floral with tart complex acidity.
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E Banexport - Cauca - Alto Capa Rosa (GrainPro) 7111 70kg 39 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Tropical fruit flavors with lively cola-like fizzy acidity and a creamy mouthfeel.
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E Banexport - Huila - Alvaro Perdomo (GrainPro) 7112 70kg 7 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Juicy lemon and green grape with rich cacao and a honey peanut butter aftertaste. Juicy lemon and green grape with rich cacao and a honey peanut butter aftertaste. Alvaro Perdomo has a 40 hectares farm, wich has 25 hectares planted with coffee.He has been cultivating coffee for 46 years. His wife Luz Fany and his three sons and two daughters help him on the farm. Coffee is harvested by a selective hand picking method collection only ripe cherries. After being harvested, coffee is washed and fermented for 30 hours and washed again. The drying process takes 15 to 20 days to be ready.
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Excelso EP 6703 70kg 19 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Cedar and stewed vegetables.
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Excelso EP 6923 70kg 6 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric, heavy, nut and chocolate. Citric, heavy, nut and chocolate. ¨Supremo¨ and ¨Excelso¨ “Supremo” and “Excelso” are bean size descriptions, not a variety or a cupping profile. Is a descriptor for exportable coffee and the way is prepare for exportation into different destinies. Supremo preparation means the coffee beans are sizedon screen 17. Excelso preparation are beans smaller than the Supremo. Exceslo is different according to the destiny where it is exported. There are four different types of Excelso coffee. Type “Klauss”: screen 16.5 for Germany “Europa”: screen 15 for France, Spain and Italy. Tolerance: 2.5% of beans between screens 12 and 15 “Scandinavia”: Screen 14 “USA”: screen 14 for the U.S. Tolerance of 1.5% of beans between screens 12 and 14. Our goal is always offer Excelso coffee on the range of 80 to 85 points with excellent attributes. Click here to read more about Colombia's coffee.
Colombia Excelso EP 7164 70kg 38 IN TRANSIT TO MSP afloat Tangy citric acidity with toffee and a savory aftertaste.
Colombia Excelso EP 7166 70kg 48 OPEN origin Toffee, herbal, tart citric and creamy.
Colombia Excelso EP 7167 70kg 114 OPEN origin Creamy and tart with caramel, floral and herbaceous flavor.
Colombia Excelso EP 7349 70kg 93 OPEN origin Citric with peanut brittle and lemongrass.
Colombia Excelso EP 7444 70kg 181 OPEN origin Chocolate and herbec.
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Excelso Cauca Cauca Community Coffee - La Sierra y Paez 6191 70kg 4 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Heavy, cedar. Heavy, cedar. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia.  The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Cauca is a Department, or State, in Colombia. The capital Popayan has a little over a quarter million people within the city limits. Cauca stretches from the Western Cordillera mountain range to the Pacific Ocean. Valle de Cauca is to the North and Narino to the south. This coffee comes from multiple farmers in the Sierra and Paez communities within Cauca. Coffees from here, when done right, are big and juicy with red fruits, caramel, chocolate and some intense lingering acids. Farmers in this region average about six acres of land. They pick, pulp, ferment and dry their coffee on raised beds with parabolic covers. They tend to work similar varietals, some old, some relatively old and some new but the style is pretty much the same. We think that the terroir or soil, sun weather and placement on the planet contribute largely to the flavor of these coffees, when picked ripe and handled properly. These coffees are selected by cup and then blended together like a Rhone wine or a local honey that comes many fields in a four mile radius. 
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Excelso Tolima Tolima Regional Select (GrainPro) 6928 70kg 119 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric and creamy with chocolate and lime. Citric and creamy with chocolate and lime. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia.  The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Tolima is a Department in Colombia in the center West of the country.  This part of the country has been difficult to travel to over the last ten years and is still a little dicey and pretty remote. Coffees from here, when done right, are nutty, tangy and fruity with creamy body and clean lingering acidity. Farmers in this region have slightly larger farms than most in the south, sometimes 10-15 hectares of land. They pick, pulp, ferment and dry their coffee on raised beds with parabolic covers. They tend to work similar varietals, some old, some relatively old and some new but the style is pretty much the same. We think that the terroir or soil, sun weather and placement on the planet contribute largely to the flavor of these coffees when picked ripe and handled properly. So these coffees are selected by cup and then blended together like a Rhone wine or a local honey that comes many fields in a 4 mile radius. 
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FTO Excelso Fair Trade Organic Ecolsierra Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta - FLO ID 22057 6443 70kg 162 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric acidity with cherry and herbal flavors. Citric acidity with cherry and herbal flavors. For blogs click here and here For images click here and here The Kogis have been cultivating coffee since the 1970's when they retreated to the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta trying to escape from their invaders or 'little-brothers'.  They found these plants in the lands they were retreating to and saw the value they had and decided to commercialize it.  Thanks to this crop they have been using the cash to reclaim lands that were taken away from them.  
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FTO Excelso Fair Trade Organic Ecolsierra Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta - FLO ID 22057 6467 70kg 131 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Savory with lemon acidity. Savory with lemon acidity. For blogs click here and here For images click here and here The Kogis have been cultivating coffee since the 1970's when they retreated to the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta trying to escape from their invaders or 'little-brothers'.  They found these plants in the lands they were retreating to and saw the value they had and decided to commercialize it.  Thanks to this crop they have been using the cash to reclaim lands that were taken away from them.  
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Huila El Pital - Coagrobrisas (GrainPro) 6859 70kg 23 CALM Melbourne melbourne-au Creamy, chocolate, orange, floral and praline Creamy, chocolate, orange, floral and praline Pital is a region located in the South Center part of Huila Department. Two active volcanos near the region influences the climate and soil, allowing the production of quality coffee. COAGROBRISAS is a coffee cooperative located in the Pital municipality, Huila Department. It was founded on 2003 by 20 coffee families decided to start a new cooperative in order to work together as a group to achieve better coffee quality and being able sold their coffee a better prices. Nowadays the cooperative has 216 active members with a total of 870 productive hectares. The potential of production is 1,900,000 kgs of parchment coffee. COAGROBRISAS owns a collection center and a dry facility. The dry facility includes solar and mechanics systems with a capacity of dry 100,000 kgs per week. The warehouse has the capability to store 250,000 coffee kgs. The dry mill has the capability to convert 700 kgs of parchment coffee to green coffee per hour.
Colombia Huila Acevedo - Primaveral (GrainPro) 7157 70kg 275 OPEN origin Asociacion de Productores Primaveral is a group of 21 farming families near the town of Acavedo in the State of Huila in Southern Colombia. Together, they have about 120 Hectares of land in production, growing mainly Caturra with a little bit of Variedad Colombia at 1,300 to 1,700 meters. This is an absolutely stunning part of the world rich with Tropical Fruits, flowers, birds, insects and a deeply colored, heavy sky that seems close enough to touch. Coffee in this region is hand-picked with usually four to five passes throughout the harvest season, picking only ripe cherries. The coffee is pulped, washed, fermented overnight and laid out to dry on raised beds with a parabolic cover to keep out the rain and dew. We have been working on a program with this group of producers where we offer them an additional 135,000 Pesos per Carga(250 lbs) when they tender coffee that is below 11% moisture and above 86 points on the cupping table. For coffees that are above 88 points, we keep them separate by producer and call them Micro-lots and of course, pay even more. They have been extremely pleased with these premiums and we are happy to be able to develop for market, some of the best coffees in this region of Colombia.
Colombia Huila Acevedo - Primaveral (GrainPro) 7160 70kg 204 OPEN origin Asociacion de Productores Primaveral is a group of 21 farming families near the town of Acavedo in the State of Huila in Southern Colombia. Together, they have about 120 Hectares of land in production, growing mainly Caturra with a little bit of Variedad Colombia at 1,300 to 1,700 meters. This is an absolutely stunning part of the world rich with Tropical Fruits, flowers, birds, insects and a deeply colored, heavy sky that seems close enough to touch. Coffee in this region is hand-picked with usually four to five passes throughout the harvest season, picking only ripe cherries. The coffee is pulped, washed, fermented overnight and laid out to dry on raised beds with a parabolic cover to keep out the rain and dew. We have been working on a program with this group of producers where we offer them an additional 135,000 Pesos per Carga(250 lbs) when they tender coffee that is below 11% moisture and above 86 points on the cupping table. For coffees that are above 88 points, we keep them separate by producer and call them Micro-lots and of course, pay even more. They have been extremely pleased with these premiums and we are happy to be able to develop for market, some of the best coffees in this region of Colombia.
Colombia Huila San Agustin - Los Naranjos (GrainPro) 7161 70kg 209 AFLOAT afloat This coffee is produced by 97 small coffee growers who comprise the "Asociacion Los Naranjos San Agustin." The individual farms are an average of 1.5 hectares, and the coffee they produce is fully washed and fully patio sun-dried. All coffee is hand sorted to ensure the highest quality beans. This commitment to quality is certainly shown in the cup, which is bright, fruity, and complex with a soft and sweet body. The Video above shows the people, sights, and sounds of the members of Association Los Naranjos in San Agustin, Huila Colombia. These amazing people's coffee is some of the most exquisite Colombian coffee, and we are proud to have grown with them over the past several years, seeing their members win Cup of Excellence, the United States Barista Championship, and the World Barista Championship. We have proudly sent this coffee across the globe to the US, Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan, Europe, and Korea. The global demand for this coffee is a testament to the integrity of these people and their commitment to quality. Thank you Los Naranjos! (Entire video shot on the Fujifilm X100)
Colombia Huila Acevedo - Primaveral (GrainPro) 7245 70kg 20 AFLOAT   afloat
Colombia Huila Acevedo - Primaveral (GrainPro) 7443 70kg 260 OPEN origin Asociacion de Productores Primaveral is a group of 21 farming families near the town of Acavedo in the State of Huila in Southern Colombia. Together, they have about 120 Hectares of land in production, growing mainly Caturra with a little bit of Variedad Colombia at 1,300 to 1,700 meters. This is an absolutely stunning part of the world rich with Tropical Fruits, flowers, birds, insects and a deeply colored, heavy sky that seems close enough to touch. Coffee in this region is hand-picked with usually four to five passes throughout the harvest season, picking only ripe cherries. The coffee is pulped, washed, fermented overnight and laid out to dry on raised beds with a parabolic cover to keep out the rain and dew. We have been working on a program with this group of producers where we offer them an additional 135,000 Pesos per Carga(250 lbs) when they tender coffee that is below 11% moisture and above 86 points on the cupping table. For coffees that are above 88 points, we keep them separate by producer and call them Micro-lots and of course, pay even more. They have been extremely pleased with these premiums and we are happy to be able to develop for market, some of the best coffees in this region of Colombia.
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Microlot Excelso Tolima (GrainPro) 6691 70kg 8 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC   minnesota-us
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Microlot Banexport Best of Cauca - Santander, Francisco Paz Penagos (GrainPro) 6813 70kg 3 Eniti Limited UK london-eu For a full story on our first "Cuaca Best Cup" experience, read this blog written by Cafe Imports' founder Andrew Miller. Colombia is bisected by the Andes Mountains which split into three parallel cordilleras (mountain ranges) as they run south to north. Coffee grows throughout these mountains from North to South with the addition of Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, an isolated mountain range in the North of the country where a number of indigenous tribes produce Organic and Fair Trade coffees. The three mountain ranges produce diversemicro-climates inthe North vs.South/East vs. West sidesof the mountains. The majority of Colombian coffee territory has two harvests; Principal and the Mitaca, which is typically smaller. In the North, principal is in Nov. with the Mitaca in May-June. The South has the opposite of that; Principal in May-June and Mitaca in Nov. scattered across the country in some of the most biologically diverse landscapes in the world. Growing regions In our search for the best coffees out of Colombia we have been and still are cupping hundreds of coffees, talking with producers and exporters, competing in cup of excellence competitions and communicating/innovatingwith our partners. Cauca Region The producers in Cauca are men and women with passion for their land. They areusually members of the producer communities andindigenous descendants. In Cauca, thereare 94,000 producers, with 84,000 hectares in coffee production.The average production in Cauca is 20-25 coffee bags per hectare.
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Microlot Banexport - Cauca - Rio Negro (GrainPro) 7107 70kg 37 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Rich sugar and fruit with intense cola-like acidity and a mild aftertaste. Rich sugar and fruit with intense cola-like acidity and a mild aftertaste. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Cauca is a Department, or State, in Colombia. The capital Popayan has a little over a quarter million people within the city limits. Cauca stretches from the Western Cordillera mountain range to the Pacific Ocean. Valle de Cauca is to the North and Narino to the south. This coffee comes from multiple farmers in the Sierra and Paez communities within Cauca.Coffees from here, when done right, are big and juicy with red fruits, caramel, chocolate and some intense lingering acids. Farmers in this region average about six acres of land. They pick, pulp, ferment and dry their coffee on raised beds with parabolic covers. They tend to work similar varietals, some old, some relatively old and some new but the style is pretty much the same. We think that the terroir or soil, sun weather and placement on the planet contribute largely to the flavor of these coffees, when picked ripe and handled properly. These coffees are selected by cup and then blended together like a Rhone wine or a local honey that comes many fields in a four mile radius.
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Microlot Banexport - Cauca - Rio Negro (GrainPro) 7108 70kg 60 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Rich sugar and fruit with intense cola-like acidity and a mild aftertaste. Rich sugar and fruit with intense cola-like acidity and a mild aftertaste. Microlot program is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Rio Negro is a municipality from Cauca Department, or State, in Colombia. The capital Popayan has a little over a quarter million people within the city limits. Cauca stretches from the Western Cordillera mountain range to the Pacific Ocean. Valle de Cauca is to the North and Narino to the south. This coffee comes from multiple farmers in the Sierra and Paez communities within Cauca. Coffees from here, when done right, are big and juicy with red fruits, caramel, chocolate and some intense lingering acids. Farmers in this region average about six acres of land. They pick, pulp, ferment and dry their coffee on raised beds with parabolic covers. They tend to work similar varietals, some old, some relatively old and some new but the style is pretty much the same. We think that the terroir or soil, sun weather and placement on the planet contribute largely to the flavor of these coffees, when picked ripe and handled properly. These coffees are selected by cup and then blended together like a Rhone wine or a local honey that comes many fields in a four mile radius.
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Microlot Banexport - Huila - Oporapa (GrainPro) 7110 70kg 60 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Caramel and brown sugar flavors with lively, cola-like acidity and a fruity aftertaste. Caramel and brown sugar flavors with lively, cola-like acidity and a fruity aftertaste. Microlot program is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Coffee production represents the majority income generation at the Huila Department. Huila production represents the 16.30% of Colombia’s total production. In last few years the production of specialty coffee has increased in Huila Some statistics about Huila Coffee represents the 7.3% Gross Domestic Product 301,000 people depend on coffee activities 103,200 direct jobs and 198,000 indirect jobs in the coffee sector 96% of the producers are smallholders with an average size farm of 1.5 hectares. The smallholders produce the 82% of the coffee production. Oparapa is a municipalty located in the Huila department.
Colombia Microlot Timana Tobo (GrainPro) 7235 70kg 40 AFLOAT   afloat
Colombia Microlot Oporapa (GrainPro) 7236 70kg 10 AFLOAT   afloat
Colombia Microlot Guacacayo (GrainPro) 7237 70kg 70 AFLOAT   afloat
Colombia Microlot Guacayo (GrainPro) 7238 70kg 13 AFLOAT   afloat
Colombia Microlot Monte Bonito (GrainPro) 7239 70kg 10 AFLOAT   afloat
Colombia Microlot Rio Negro (GrainPro) 7240 70kg 6 AFLOAT   afloat
Colombia Microlot San Adolfo (GrainPro) 7241 70kg 7 AFLOAT   afloat
Colombia Microlot Albania (GrainPro) 7242 70kg 30 AFLOAT   afloat
Colombia Microlot Banexport - Huila - Bordoneo (GrainPro) 7416 70kg 8 OPEN origin Balanced, crisp and creamy with toffee, raisin, cherry, caramel and lemon.
Colombia Microlot Banexport - Huila - San Isidro (GrainPro) 7422 70kg 7 OPEN origin Heavy with a floral nose, chocolate, cherry cola and intense phosphoric acidity.
Colombia Microlot Banexport - Huila - Aromas del Sur Palestina (GrainPro) 7423 70kg 35 OPEN origin Balanced and very sweet with bing cherry, stone fruit, caramel and cola.
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Microlot 1 Los Libios (GrainPro) 6963 70kg 65 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Caramel, toffee and raisin with citric acidity.
Colombia Microlot 2 Huila - San Agustin - Finca El Faldon - 1900 Mts - Arnulfo Leguizamo (GrainPro) 7400 70kg 6 AFLOAT afloat Arnulfo Leguizamo is who every cafetero in Colombia should aspire to be. He is a member of Asociacion Los Naranjos, a project we have developed over the years were we pay a premium for coffees that meet certain cup-quality specifications. In 2011, he won the first price at the Cup of Excellence with coffee from this farm. An unprecedented price of $45/lb was paid for the Cup of Excellence coffee. He promised his family he would take them to see the ocean and he already did. (He showed us the pictures to prove it). Arnulfo is very proud to be a farmer. What this new generation of cafeteros wants is recognition for their hard work and the means to sell their coffee as a traceable microlot and not a blend. We met Diego, his son, at the Los Naranjos cupping lab. He is training to be a cupper at the moment and plans to stay in the business. Farmers are now starting to understand the importance of being able to taste their own coffee. We are really excited for Arnulfo and Los Naranjos' future! It looks promising and should bring us more top-notch coffee throughout the years. Arnulfo Leguizamo COE Secrets from Noah N on Vimeo.
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Microlot 3 Buenavista Farm (GrainPro) 6964 70kg 65 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Chocolate, citric and herbal.
Colombia Microlot 4 Huila - San Agustin - Finca Primavera - 1750 Mts - Arnulfo Leguizamo (GrainPro) 7401 70kg 2 AFLOAT afloat Arnulfo Leguizamo is who every cafetero in Colombia should aspire to be. He is a member of Asociacion Los Naranjos, a project we have developed over the years were we pay a premium for coffees that meet certain cup-quality specifications. In 2011, he won the first price at the Cup of Excellence with coffee from this farm. An unprecedented price of $45/lb was paid for the Cup of Excellence coffee. He promised his family he would take them to see the ocean and he already did. (He showed us the pictures to prove it). Arnulfo is very proud to be a farmer. What this new generation of cafeteros wants is recognition for their hard work and the means to sell their coffee as a traceable microlot and not a blend. We met Diego, his son, at the Los Naranjos cupping lab. He is training to be a cupper at the moment and plans to stay in the business. Farmers are now starting to understand the importance of being able to taste their own coffee. We are really excited for Arnulfo and Los Naranjos' future! It looks promising and should bring us more top-notch coffee throughout the years.
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Microlot 7 CoE Lot # 1 - Bella Vista - Carmen Cecilia Montoya Patiño (VacPack) 7217 24kg 1 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us 2014 Colombia South COE winner more on this coffee at the Alliance for Coffee Excellence website
Colombia Microlot 8 Carmen Cecilia Montoya Patiño (GrainPro) 7409 70kg 20 OPEN origin Sweet with dried cherry, raspberry, floral perfume and cola flavors; a chewy mouthfeel and intense lemon phosphoric acidity.
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Org Popayan Organic - Non Fair Trade Tierradentro 6685 70kg 85 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Chocolate, nutty and herbal. Chocolate, nutty and herbal. View blog here We purchased this lot through Asociacion de Cabildos Juan Tama.  This is an indigenous group of coffee producers which are comprised of 8 different cabildos (tribes).  The total land of the 1400+ families amounts to 2,000 hectares with a total of 400 farms--all of which are certified organic.  About 25,000 people in the area depend one way or the other in coffee production. The eight cabildos are: Yaquiva, La Gaitana, San Andres, Santa Rosa, Calderas, Tumbichucue, Turbina and San Jose del Pedregal. In 1995 Unesco declared the Tierradentro Reserve to be a world heritage site, a center of historical and cultural heritage; citing mainly the necropolis of pre-hispanic Colombia or the Hippogeos of Tierradentro.  It is also home to a group of 1800 families of indigenous Colombians, organized in to six Resquerdos or reserves and eight Cabildos or tribes. The Cabildos provide guidance, technical assistance and quality control to the coffee farming families which receive social benefits and a way to maintain independence. They have been producing coffee for generations but have historically sold in on the street or to an independent collector. Recently though with some guidance and an independent passion, they have been able to commercialize their coffee themselves and it is very nice coffee.   The average farm in this region is about 3 acres with traditional varietals of Typica and Caturra growing amongst a forest of plantains, avacados, mangoes and guayaba fruits. The forest floor is a bed of mosses and what we could consider ornamental plants of pansies, violets and thick ferns. There is ample water coming down out of the mountains that producers use to ferment and wash their coffee. Most have a small hand pulpers out back and ferment overnight in a tub for something like 10-13 hours depending on the ambient temperature and humidity. It is a hand test in the morning to determine if the sugars are off the beans and then in to the drier, a small parabolic drier with a bamboo floor and domed poly roof to keep the afternoons rain off.  Once dried it goes to the communal warehouse in town where it is catalogued and cupped. Click here to see more pictures of Colombia and its coffee growing regions. 
Colombia Organic Popayan 2 Organic - Non Fair Trade Tierradentro 7397 70kg 280 OPEN origin View blog here We purchased this lot through Asociacion de Cabildos Juan Tama.  This is an indigenous group of coffee producers which are comprised of 8 different cabildos (tribes).  The total land of the 1400+ families amounts to 2,000 hectares with a total of 400 farms--all of which are certified organic.  About 25,000 people in the area depend one way or the other in coffee production. The eight cabildos are: Yaquiva, La Gaitana, San Andres, Santa Rosa, Calderas, Tumbichucue, Turbina and San Jose del Pedregal. In 1995 Unesco declared the Tierradentro Reserve to be a world heritage site, a center of historical and cultural heritage; citing mainly the necropolis of pre-hispanic Colombia or the Hippogeos of Tierradentro.  It is also home to a group of 1800 families of indigenous Colombians, organized in to six Resquerdos or reserves and eight Cabildos or tribes. The Cabildos provide guidance, technical assistance and quality control to the coffee farming families which receive social benefits and a way to maintain independence. They have been producing coffee for generations but have historically sold in on the street or to an independent collector. Recently though with some guidance and an independent passion, they have been able to commercialize their coffee themselves and it is very nice coffee.   The average farm in this region is about 3 acres with traditional varietals of Typica and Caturra growing amongst a forest of plantains, avacados, mangoes and guayaba fruits. The forest floor is a bed of mosses and what we could consider ornamental plants of pansies, violets and thick ferns. There is ample water coming down out of the mountains that producers use to ferment and wash their coffee. Most have a small hand pulpers out back and ferment overnight in a tub for something like 10-13 hours depending on the ambient temperature and humidity. It is a hand test in the morning to determine if the sugars are off the beans and then in to the drier, a small parabolic drier with a bamboo floor and domed poly roof to keep the afternoons rain off.  Once dried it goes to the communal warehouse in town where it is catalogued and cupped. Click here to see more pictures of Colombia and its coffee growing regions. 
Colombia Palestina Banexport (GrainPro) 7234 70kg 189 AFLOAT afloat Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Coffee production represents the majority income generation at the Huila Department. Huila production represents the 16.30% of Colombia’s total production. In last few years the production of specialty coffee has increased in Huila Some statistics about Huila Coffee represents the 7.3% Gross Domestic Product 301,000 people depend on coffee activities 103,200 direct jobs and 198,000 indirect jobs in the coffee sector 96% of the producers are smallholders with an average size farm of 1.5 hectares. The smallholders produce the 82% of the coffee production. About Palestina: Palestina is considered as the water source for all the Huila, due to their forrest and water births. The climate is cold and template, allowing the production of coffee in all the municipality.
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Regional Select Banexport - Cauca (GrainPro) 6087 70kg 4 CALM Melbourne melbourne-au Chocolate with bright citrus. Chocolate with bright citrus. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia.  The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Cauca is a Department, or State, in Colombia. The capital Popayan has a little over a quarter million people within the city limits. Cauca stretches from the Western Cordillera mountain range to the Pacific Ocean. Valle de Cauca is to the North and Narino to the south. Coffees from here, when done right, are big and juicy with red fruits, caramel, chocolate and some intense lingering acids. Farmers in this region average about six acres of land. They pick, pulp, ferment and dry their coffee on raised beds with parabolic covers. They tend to work similar varietals, some old, some relatively old and some new but the style is pretty much the same. We think that the terroir or soil, sun weather and placement on the planet contribute largely to the flavor of these coffees, when picked ripe and handled properly. These coffees are selected by cup and then blended together like a Rhone wine or a local honey that comes many fields in a four mile radius. 
Colombia
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Regional Select Banexport - Huila San Marcos (GrainPro) 6985 70kg 16 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Transparent and lively with cotton candy sweetness, floral, green grape, tropical fruit, vanilla, honey and brown sugar. Tartaric and phosphoric acidity. Transparent and lively with cotton candy sweetness, floral, green grape, tropical fruit, vanilla, honey and brown sugar. Tartaric and phosphoric acidity. Regional Selects is a project we created in Colombia last year to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we have been highlighting are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. This particular coffee is from a neighborhood called San Marcos wich is in the mountains outside of Timana, a small town in Southern Huila.A few farmers in this area have contributed to this lot so the micro climate and terroir is very similar and unique. The state of Huila has been one of the consistent stars of Colombia with a number of COE winners and incredible small farmers throughout the region. Coffees from here when done right have tropical fruit, vanilla, caramel, chocolate, panella and bright acidity Farmers in this region average about six acres of land. They pick, pulp, ferment and dry their coffee on raised beds with parabolic covers. They tend to work similar varietals, some old, some relatively old and some new but the style is pretty much the same. We think that the terroir or soil, sun weather and placement on the planet contribute largely to the flavor of these coffees when picked ripe and handled properly. So these coffees are selected by cup and then blended together like a Rhone wine or a local honey that comes many fields in a 4 mile radius.
Colombia
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Regional Select Banexport - Nariño (GrainPro) 7006 70kg 84 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Mild and nutty with lemon acidity, good sugar and a smooth mouthfeel. Mild and nutty with lemon acidity, good sugar and a smooth mouthfeel. This coffee is part of the “Million Pesos” program we have in Colombia for coffee that cups above 90 points.  A Million pesos per carga (125Kilos of pergamino) which is almost double what is being paid at traditional purchasing points. We have been doing this for about a year and producers are ecstatic when they make the grade as the price at the market is barely above the cost of production.  We are excited to find coffees that cup above 90 points, so it is a real winner for both sides and something we can repeat. Alejandro Ahumada farms 15 hectares of pure Castillo in Narino. There has been a lot of debate in the last few years about the cup quality of Castillo, which is the FNC's new variety, versus the traditional varietals. Here's one point for Castillo.
Colombia
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Regional Select Banexport - Huila (GrainPro) 7099 70kg 168 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Tart acids with lemon and plum flavors and a rich, sugary mouthfeel. Tart acids with lemon and plum flavors and a rich, sugary mouthfeel. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Coffee production represents the majority income generation at the Huila Department. Huila production represents the 16.30% of Colombia’s total production. In last few years the production of specialty coffee has increased in Huila Some statistics about Huila Coffee represents the 7.3% Gross Domestic Product 301,000 people depend on coffee activities 103,200 direct jobs and 198,000 indirect jobs in the coffee sector 96% of the producers are smallholders with an average size farm of 1.5 hectares. The smallholders produce the 82% of the coffee production.
Colombia
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Regional Select Banexport - Huila (GrainPro) 7100 70kg 11 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Tart acids and creamy mouthfeel with caramel, fruit and floral flavors. Tart acids and creamy mouthfeel with caramel, fruit and floral flavors. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Coffee production represents the majority income generation at the Huila Department. Huila production represents the 16.30% of Colombia’s total production. In last few years the production of specialty coffee has increased in Huila Some statistics about Huila Coffee represents the 7.3% Gross Domestic Product 301,000 people depend on coffee activities 103,200 direct jobs and 198,000 indirect jobs in the coffee sector 96% of the producers are smallholders with an average size farm of 1.5 hectares. The smallholders produce the 82% of the coffee production.
Colombia
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Regional Select Banexport - Huila (GrainPro) 7101 70kg 99 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Toffee and sweet orange with a mild nutty aftertaste. Toffee and sweet orange with a mild nutty aftertaste. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Coffee production represents the majority income generation at the Huila Department. Huila production represents the 16.30% of Colombia’s total production. In last few years the production of specialty coffee has increased in Huila Some statistics about Huila Coffee represents the 7.3% Gross Domestic Product 301,000 people depend on coffee activities 103,200 direct jobs and 198,000 indirect jobs in the coffee sector 96% of the producers are smallholders with an average size farm of 1.5 hectares. The smallholders produce the 82% of the coffee production.
Colombia
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Regional Select Banexport - Huila (GrainPro) 7102 70kg 27 CALM Melbourne melbourne-au Tart acids with lemon and plum flavors and a rich, sugary mouthfeel. Tart acids with lemon and plum flavors and a rich, sugary mouthfeel. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Coffee production represents the majority income generation at the Huila Department. Huila production represents the 16.30% of Colombia’s total production. In last few years the production of specialty coffee has increased in Huila Some statistics about Huila Coffee represents the 7.3% Gross Domestic Product 301,000 people depend on coffee activities 103,200 direct jobs and 198,000 indirect jobs in the coffee sector 96% of the producers are smallholders with an average size farm of 1.5 hectares. The smallholders produce the 82% of the coffee production.
Colombia
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Regional Select Banexport - Huila (GrainPro) 7103 70kg 25 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Tart acids with lemon and plum flavors and a rich, sugary mouthfeel. Tart acids with lemon and plum flavors and a rich, sugary mouthfeel. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Coffee production represents the majority income generation at the Huila Department. Huila production represents the 16.30% of Colombia’s total production. In last few years the production of specialty coffee has increased in Huila Some statistics about Huila Coffee represents the 7.3% Gross Domestic Product 301,000 people depend on coffee activities 103,200 direct jobs and 198,000 indirect jobs in the coffee sector 96% of the producers are smallholders with an average size farm of 1.5 hectares. The smallholders produce the 82% of the coffee production.
Colombia
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Regional Select Banexport - Nariño (GrainPro) 7104 70kg 155 CALM Melbourne melbourne-au Intense citric acidity with lemon and floral flavors and a crisp aftertaste. Intense citric acidity with lemon and floral flavors and a crisp aftertaste. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Nariño, Cauca and Tolima. Nariño is a southeastdepartment of Colombia. The closeness location with the Andes Mountains creates a diversification of micro-climates; a perfect condition for coffee production. Coffee production and commercialization is source of income for the municipality. There is an approximation of 3,607.93 hectares planted with coffee in the region.
Colombia
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Regional Select Banexport - Tolima (GrainPro) 7105 70kg 169 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Caramel, savory cola and grapefruit flavors with a heavy mouthfeel. Caramel, savory cola and grapefruit flavors with a heavy mouthfeel. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia.  The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Tolima is a Department in Colombia in the center West of the country.  This part of the country has been difficult to travel to over the last ten years and is still a little dicey and pretty remote. Coffees from here, when done right, are nutty, tangy and fruity with creamy body and clean lingering acidity. Farmers in this region have slightly larger farms than most in the south, sometimes 10-15 hectares of land. They pick, pulp, ferment and dry their coffee on raised beds with parabolic covers. They tend to work similar varietals, some old, some relatively old and some new but the style is pretty much the same. We think that the terroir or soil, sun weather and placement on the planet contribute largely to the flavor of these coffees when picked ripe and handled properly. So these coffees are selected by cup and then blended together like a Rhone wine or a local honey that comes many fields in a 4 mile radius. 
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila (GrainPro) 7232 70kg 250 AFLOAT afloat Creamy with caramel and cola sweetness, tropical fruit, lemon-lime, green grape and cherry; tangy acidity. Creamy with caramel and cola sweetness, tropical fruit, lemon-lime, green grape and cherry; tangy acidity. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Coffee production represents the majority income generation at the Huila Department. Huila production represents the 16.30% of Colombia’s total production. In last few years the production of specialty coffee has increased in Huila Some statistics about Huila Coffee represents the 7.3% Gross Domestic Product 301,000 people depend on coffee activities 103,200 direct jobs and 198,000 indirect jobs in the coffee sector 96% of the producers are smallholders with an average size farm of 1.5 hectares. The smallholders produce the 82% of the coffee production.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila (GrainPro) 7233 70kg 121 AFLOAT afloat Dense rich sugars- honey and caramel with savory fruits, plum, red grape, orange and spice flavors; tangy and sparkling acidity. Dense rich sugars- honey and caramel with savory fruits, plum, red grape, orange and spice flavors; tangy and sparkling acidity. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Coffee production represents the majority income generation at the Huila Department. Huila production represents the 16.30% of Colombia’s total production. In last few years the production of specialty coffee has increased in Huila Some statistics about Huila Coffee represents the 7.3% Gross Domestic Product 301,000 people depend on coffee activities 103,200 direct jobs and 198,000 indirect jobs in the coffee sector 96% of the producers are smallholders with an average size farm of 1.5 hectares. The smallholders produce the 82% of the coffee production.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila - Costa Rica (GrainPro) 7410 70kg 45 OPEN origin Tart complex acidity with vanilla, floral and citrus fruit.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila - Tobo (GrainPro) 7411 70kg 30 OPEN origin Transparent with raisin, toffee, clove and chocolate; crisp phosphoric acidity.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila - Hermanos Motta (GrainPro) 7412 70kg 75 OPEN origin Sugary with caramel, green grape, lemon and a floral aftertaste; tangy and lively acidity. Sugary with caramel, green grape, lemon and a floral aftertaste; tangy and lively acidity. Don Edgar Motta and brothers havea 80 hectares farm located in Palestina, Huila. The farm has production of Caturra, Bourboun and recently they planted Pink Bourbon. Coffee is harvest by a selective hand picking of only ripe cherries. Coffee is depulp and fermented for 8-12 hours on tanks,depending on the weather. After fermentation is done, coffee is dried at parabolic dryers.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila - Bordones (GrainPro) 7413 70kg 12 OPEN origin Tart and heavy with caramel, cola, green grape, floral and cherry flavor; lively acids.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila - Palestina (GrainPro) 7414 70kg 19 OPEN origin Heavy and tangy with toffee and nice green grape acids. Heavy and tangy with toffee and nice green grape acids. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Coffee production represents the majority income generation at the Huila Department. Huila production represents the 16.30% of Colombia’s total production. In last few years the production of specialty coffee has increased in Huila Some statistics about Huila Coffee represents the 7.3% Gross Domestic Product 301,000 people depend on coffee activities 103,200 direct jobs and 198,000 indirect jobs in the coffee sector 96% of the producers are smallholders with an average size farm of 1.5 hectares. The smallholders produce the 82% of the coffee production. About Palestina: Palestina is considered as the water source for all the Huila, due to their forrest and water births. The climate is cold and template, allowing the production of coffee in all the municipality.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila - Palestina (GrainPro) 7415 70kg 22 OPEN origin Round with caramel, red grape and savory flavors; creamy and tartaric. Round with caramel, red grape and savory flavors; creamy and tartaric. Regional Selects is a new project we are creating in Colombia meant to highlight the unique profiles we have found are inherent in specific microregions within Colombia. The regions we will begin highlighting to start are Huila, Narino, Cauca and Tolima. Coffee production represents the majority income generation at the Huila Department. Huila production represents the 16.30% of Colombia’s total production. In last few years the production of specialty coffee has increased in Huila Some statistics about Huila Coffee represents the 7.3% Gross Domestic Product 301,000 people depend on coffee activities 103,200 direct jobs and 198,000 indirect jobs in the coffee sector 96% of the producers are smallholders with an average size farm of 1.5 hectares. The smallholders produce the 82% of the coffee production. About Palestina: Palestina is considered as the water source for all the Huila, due to their forrest and water births. The climate is cold and template, allowing the production of coffee in all the municipality.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila - Yamboro (GrainPro) 7417 70kg 5 OPEN origin Chocolate and coffee cherry with a creamy mouthfeel and tart red wine vinegar acidity.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila - Guayabito Salado Blanco (GrainPro) 7418 70kg 50 OPEN origin Juicy and soft with caramel fruit and tart cherry; tartaric acidity.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila - Aromas del Sur Palestina (GrainPro) 7419 70kg 80 OPEN origin Cherry cola, stone fruit and savory flavors; lively mouthfeel and tangy acidity.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila - Bruselas (GrainPro) 7420 70kg 5 OPEN origin Floral, grapefruit and savory with sparkling acids.
Colombia Regional Select Banexport - Huila - Acevedo (GrainPro) 7421 70kg 5 OPEN origin Balanced and tangy with toffee, lemon, raisin, chocolate and tomato.
Colombia
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Variety Select Banexport - Yellow Bourbon (GrainPro) 7000 70kg 25 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Sugary with lemon and green grape flavors and crisp acidity. Sugary with lemon and green grape flavors and crisp acidity. Oscar Agudelo Hoyos has 3.3 Hectares of Yellow Bourbon trees growing onpart of a 5.5 Hectare farmin the Region of Alto Del Obispo in Southern Huila, just South of Pitalito. The other varieties are Caturra and Red Bourbon. He harvestthese varieties seperately and keeps them apart during processing. His method is to pick ripe cherries, pulp in to a tankand dry ferment for 24 hours. He washes the coffee four times and moves it to a covered patio to pre-dry for 3 days before moving to a more sunny patio. When tasting Yellow Bourbon cherries versus Red Bourbon cherries on this farm I found the Yellow fruits to be slightly more sweet but really more elegant and delicate in the mouth. You will also notice that the trees are tall and spindly with not a great concentration of cherries. This is why producers tend to shy away from heirloom varieties and move towards more prolific producers like Colombia and Castillo This our first large lot of Yellow Bourbon from Colombia and the coffee was a terrific suprise with classic Huila flavors of Tropical Fruits, caramel, vanilla and the exceptional intensity of Colombian Coffees. Enjoy! Yellow Bourbon is a natural cross between Red Bourbon and Amarelo de Botacuto, which is labelled as a Typica variant with yellow fruit. Bourbon resulted from selections made by French botanists in wild Yemeni coffee groves. Moved to controlled fields for propagation, the relatively humble stock produced a remarkable variety and was given the namesake of its nursery - Bourbon Island - upon its introduction to South America. Under expanded cultivation in Brazil, a yellow mutant with a unique flavor profile expressed itself and was isolated, expanded, and named for its color. read this blog to learn more about our Variety Select project
Congo
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FLO Fairtrade Org Organic - Non Fair Trade Fully Washed SOPACDI FLO ID 26275 (GrainPro) 6578 60kg 6 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Juicy, soft and citric with floral and savory tomato flavor. Juicy, soft and citric with floral and savory tomato flavor. From Sopacdi.com... We are over 5600 farmers from different ethnic groups in the Kivu Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, producing some of the finest coffee in Africa.  After years of conflict and civil war, our Fairtrade-certified coffee promotes working together for a better future. We live in a beautiful but very difficult place. Our small communities are remote, scattered amongst the highlands of the mountains surrounding Lake Kivu in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Our coffee grows at an altitude of 1460m to over 2000 metres above sea level.  We have lived through civil war and in great poverty for many years, but since forming our cooperative Sopacdi, despite our challenges, we also feel full of hope. For the first time we have good buyers for our coffee, who buy from us directly. Our homes are basic, without electricity, running water and other amenities. But our families are back together and we are re-building our communities. Our headquarters are in the town of Minova, and we have just finished building the first coffee washing station in the region for over 40 years. The first coffee in the DR Congo to achieve top national grade – Kivu 2 – since 1967 Specialty fully-washed arabica coffee Organic certification FLO certification number 26275 Main harvest from March to June; fly crop from September to October Shipments from June to December Altitude 1460m to over 2000 metres above sea level  
Congo FLO Fairtrade Org Organic - Non Fair Trade Fully Washed SOPACDI FLO ID 26275 (GrainPro) 7463 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Congo FLO Fairtrade Org Organic - Non Fair Trade Fully Washed SOPACDI FLO ID 26275 (GrainPro) 7464 60kg 320 OPEN   origin
Costa Rica
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Microlot 2 Aguilera Bros - Finca Chayote (GrainPro) 6292 69kg 6 CALM Melbourne melbourne-au Juicy, very sweet and complex with floral, fig, apricot, lime, toffee and caramel flavors. Juicy, very sweet and complex with floral, fig, apricot, lime, toffee and caramel flavors. Cafe Imports is excited to be working with the Aguilera Bros in West Valley.  The Aguilera’s are a total of 12 brothers and sisters all of which are involved in coffee from the time of their parents.  The brothers work the mill and farms themselves with basically no hired labor other than pickers during the harvest.  With the help of the third-generation, they work the mill, work the drying patios, prune the coffee fields, fertilize, etc year-round.  The Aguilera Bros understand quality at the farm level and mill level and this is why we are excited about working with them. Most of their coffee is of the Villa Sarchi variety native to the area and excellent in the cup.  Villa Sarchi is a Bourbon mutation (similar to Caturra and Pacas) found originally in Naranjo, West Valley.  It is a dwarf variety with short internodes and usually higher yielding production.  The cup can be floral, with great intense and elegant acidity, high fruit tones (like passion fruit), and pleasing sweetness. The Aguilera Bros are getting ready to dry-mill their own coffee this upcoming harvest (2013/2014).  They are also experimenting with different varieties such as Pacamara and Geisha.  We are very excited to see what next harvest will bring from Aguilera Bros! ***************************************************** Coffee has been cultivated in Costa Rica since 1779.  Currently, the regions producing the best quality are Tarrazu, West Valley, and Central Valley.  Coffee production has been threatened the past decade due to a real-estate boom converting coffee-lands into prime development properties.  San Jose, the capital, is right in the heart of Central Valley where you will find private houses next to coffee farms.  The value of these farms have now skyrocketed. Cafe Imports bought its first Costa Rica microlot container at the end of the 2006/2007 harvest; at that time the microlot offerings were basically non-existent.  In six years the Costa Rica microlot market has grown to be one of the most popular origins that deliver very consistent quality year-after-year.  The Costa’s Cafe Imports is carrying this spring (2013) are all sourced directly from micro-mills and producers were paid at the Farm Gate level.  We managed local transportation, dry-milling, consolidation, and exportation of the coffees.  This experience is extremely valuable as it gives us a better understanding of what it takes to get coffee from cherry to export quality in GrainPro and Yute with its corresponding marks. Cafe Imports is excited to bring you, once again, high-quality and traceable microlots from Costa Rica. -Piero Cristiani
Costa Rica
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Microlot 2 Aguilera Bros - Finca Toño (GrainPro) 6314 69kg 17 Eniti Limited UK london-eu fruit and caramel aromatics with tart acidity and raisin, lime, honey, nut and savory flavors. fruit and caramel aromatics with tart acidity and raisin, lime, honey, nut and savory flavors. Cafe Imports is excited to be working with the Aguilera Bros in West Valley.  The Aguilera’s are a total of 12 brothers and sisters all of which are involved in coffee from the time of their parents.  The brothers work the mill and farms themselves with basically no hired labor other than pickers during the harvest.  With the help of the third-generation, they work the mill, work the drying patios, prune the coffee fields, fertilize, etc year-round.  The Aguilera Bros understand quality at the farm level and mill level and this is why we are excited about working with them. Most of their coffee is of the Villa Sarchi variety native to the area and excellent in the cup.  Villa Sarchi is a Bourbon mutation (similar to Caturra and Pacas) found originally in Naranjo, West Valley.  It is a dwarf variety with short internodes and usually higher yielding production.  The cup can be floral, with great intense and elegant acidity, high fruit tones (like passion fruit), and pleasing sweetness. The Aguilera Bros are getting ready to dry-mill their own coffee this upcoming harvest (2013/2014).  They are also experimenting with different varieties such as Pacamara and Geisha.  We are very excited to see what next harvest will bring from Aguilera Bros! ***************************************************** Coffee has been cultivated in Costa Rica since 1779.  Currently, the regions producing the best quality are Tarrazu, West Valley, and Central Valley.  Coffee production has been threatened the past decade due to a real-estate boom converting coffee-lands into prime development properties.  San Jose, the capital, is right in the heart of Central Valley where you will find private houses next to coffee farms.  The value of these farms have now skyrocketed. Cafe Imports bought its first Costa Rica microlot container at the end of the 2006/2007 harvest; at that time the microlot offerings were basically non-existent.  In six years the Costa Rica microlot market has grown to be one of the most popular origins that deliver very consistent quality year-after-year.  The Costa’s Cafe Imports is carrying this spring (2013) are all sourced directly from micro-mills and producers were paid at the Farm Gate level.  We managed local transportation, dry-milling, consolidation, and exportation of the coffees.  This experience is extremely valuable as it gives us a better understanding of what it takes to get coffee from cherry to export quality in GrainPro and Yute with its corresponding marks. Cafe Imports is excited to bring you, once again, high-quality and traceable microlots from Costa Rica. -Piero Cristiani
Costa Rica
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Microlot 2 Aguilera Bros - Finca Angelina (GrainPro) 6315 69kg 7 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Lively acidity and heavy with toffee, pecan and butter flavors. Lively acidity and heavy with toffee, pecan and butter flavors. Cafe Imports is excited to be working with the Aguilera Bros in West Valley.  The Aguilera’s are a total of 12 brothers and sisters all of which are involved in coffee from the time of their parents.  The brothers work the mill and farms themselves with basically no hired labor other than pickers during the harvest.  With the help of the third-generation, they work the mill, work the drying patios, prune the coffee fields, fertilize, etc year-round.  The Aguilera Bros understand quality at the farm level and mill level and this is why we are excited about working with them. Most of their coffee is of the Villa Sarchi variety native to the area and excellent in the cup.  Villa Sarchi is a Bourbon mutation (similar to Caturra and Pacas) found originally in Naranjo, West Valley.  It is a dwarf variety with short internodes and usually higher yielding production.  The cup can be floral, with great intense and elegant acidity, high fruit tones (like passion fruit), and pleasing sweetness. ************************************ Coffee has been cultivated in Costa Rica since 1779.  Currently, the regions producing the best quality are Tarrazu, West Valley, and Central Valley.  Coffee production has been threatened the past decade due to a real-estate boom converting coffee-lands into prime development properties.  San Jose, the capital, is right in the heart of Central Valley where you will find private houses next to coffee farms.  The value of these farms have now skyrocketed. Cafe Imports bought its first Costa Rica microlot container at the end of the 2006/2007 harvest; at that time the microlot offerings were basically non-existent.  In six years the Costa Rica microlot market has grown to be one of the most popular origins that deliver very consistent quality year-after-year.  The Costa’s Cafe Imports is carrying are all sourced directly from micro-mills and producers were paid at the Farm Gate level.  We managed local transportation, dry-milling, consolidation, and exportation of the coffees.  This experience is extremely valuable as it gives us a better understanding of what it takes to get coffee from cherry to export quality in GrainPro and Yute with its corresponding marks. Cafe Imports is excited to bring you, once again, high-quality and traceable microlots from Costa Rica. -Piero Cristiani
Costa Rica
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Microlot 3 Las Lajas - Yellow Honey - Cumbres del Poas (GrainPro) 6311 69kg 1 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Rich cacao with sparkling apricot, orange and lemon flavors, transparent acidity and a clean, balanced aftertaste. Rich cacao with sparkling apricot, orange and lemon flavors, transparent acidity and a clean, balanced aftertaste. Dona Francisca and Don Oscar Chacon of Las Lajas Micromill are third generation coffee producers in their family.  They inherited their farms from their grandparents and are known for being one of the first to process high-quality Honeys and Naturals in Central America and for participating in the Cup of Excellence auction in 2009. Las Lajas is an organic micromill located in Sabanilla de Alajuela in the Central Valley region of Costa Rica. Organic coffee in Costa Rica is almost non-existent and with this caliber of cup makes it one of a kind; they believe in the preservation of the environment hence their organic practices.  Las Lajas processes coffee from their family farms’; these lots are fully traceable and separated by day.  Water use is minimal since coffee is not washed.  During the harvest Francisca will measure the brix contents in the coffee cherry to determine the optimal time to pick their coffee.  21 - 22% brix content has been the maximum they’ve seen. Honey Processes Las Lajas carries several distinct processes from this mill.  Yellow Honey: 100% Mucilage left on, turning hourly on the bed Red Honey: 100% mucilage left on, turning several times a day (less frequent than yellow honey) Black Honey: 100% mucilage left on, turning only once per day Perla Negra: Natural process, turned normally on raised beds Alma Negra: Natural process, turned only a few times a day on raised beds This honey process of leaving 100% of the mucilage on in all "levels" of honey is distinctive to Las Lajas.  This just shows that terminology can mean various things region to region and farm to farm.  Cafe Imports is excited to bring you, once again, high-quality and traceable microlots from Costa Rica. Cafe Imports bought its first Costa Rica microlot container at the end of the 2006/2007 harvest; at that time the microlot offerings were basically non-existent.  In six years the Costa Rica microlot market has grown to be one of the most popular origins that deliver very consistent quality year-after-year.   The Costa’s Cafe Imports is sourcing directly from micro-mills and producers were paid at the Farm Gate level.  We managed local transportation, dry-milling, consolidation, and exportation of the coffees.  This experience is extremely valuable as it gives us a better understanding of what it takes to get coffee from cherry to export quality in GrainPro and Yute with its corresponding marks. -Piero Cristiani
Costa Rica SHB Tarrazu Café Vida (GrainPro) 6652 69kg 235 OPEN origin Coffee has been cultivated in Costa Rica since 1779. Currently, the regions producing the best quality are Tarrazu, West Valley, and Central Valley. Coffee production has been threatened in the past decade due to a real-estate boom, converting coffee-lands into prime development properties. San Jose, the capital, is right in the heart of Central Valley where you will find private houses next to coffee farms. The value of these farms have now skyrocketed. CoopeTarrazu RL Coope Tarrazu RL was founded in 1960 with a capital investment of $5.800 from 228 small coffee growers. Today, they run the biggest wet mill of Costa Rica, processing more than 110.000 bags of green coffee from 3.000 producers. About 85% of the producers affiliated to the coop harvest 4 hectares or less. Its success is based on looking after small producer´s interests, and providing other services to its members such as credit, agronomical and technical advice, sustainable prices, fertilizers, among others. The coop has also diversified about 45% of their portfolio in other areas such as gas stations, supermarkets, harware stores, and such. This is the second harvest we have sourced coffees from CoopeTarrazu and we are very excited for this partnership. They´re just starting to explore the potential in the micro-regions of Tarrazu! -Piero Cristiani
Costa Rica SHB Tarrazu Café Vida (GrainPro) 6653 69kg 1 AT DOCK afloat Sugar cane juice and lavender with tart and winey acidity. Sugar cane juice and lavender with tart and winey acidity. Coffee has been cultivated in Costa Rica since 1779.  Currently, the regions producing the best quality are Tarrazu, West Valley, and Central Valley.  Coffee production has been threatened in the past decade due to a real-estate boom, converting coffee-lands into prime development properties.  San Jose, the capital, is right in the heart of Central Valley where you will find private houses next to coffee farms.  The value of these farms have now skyrocketed. CoopeTarrazu RL Coope Tarrazu RL was founded in 1960 with a capital investment of $5.800 from 228 small coffee growers. Today, they run the biggest wet mill of Costa Rica, processing more than 110.000 bags of green coffee from 3.000 producers.  About 85% of the producers affiliated to the coop harvest 4 hectares or less. Its success is based on looking after small producer´s interests, and providing other services to its members such as credit, agronomical and technical advice, sustainable prices, fertilizers, among others.  The coop has also diversified about 45% of their portfolio in other areas such as gas stations, supermarkets, harware stores, and such. This is the second harvest we have sourced coffees from CoopeTarrazu and we are very excited for this partnership.  They´re just starting to explore the potential in the micro-regions of Tarrazu! -Piero Cristiani 
Costa Rica SHB Tarrazu Café Vida (GrainPro) 6656 69kg 190 AFLOAT afloat Caramel, grapefruit, chocolate and savory flavors with tart, tartaric acidity. Caramel, grapefruit, chocolate and savory flavors with tart, tartaric acidity. Coffee has been cultivated in Costa Rica since 1779.  Currently, the regions producing the best quality are Tarrazu, West Valley, and Central Valley.  Coffee production has been threatened in the past decade due to a real-estate boom, converting coffee-lands into prime development properties.  San Jose, the capital, is right in the heart of Central Valley where you will find private houses next to coffee farms.  The value of these farms have now skyrocketed. CoopeTarrazu RL Coope Tarrazu RL was founded in 1960 with a capital investment of $5.800 from 228 small coffee growers. Today, they run the biggest wet mill of Costa Rica, processing more than 110.000 bags of green coffee from 3.000 producers.  About 85% of the producers affiliated to the coop harvest 4 hectares or less. Its success is based on looking after small producer´s interests, and providing other services to its members such as credit, agronomical and technical advice, sustainable prices, fertilizers, among others.  The coop has also diversified about 45% of their portfolio in other areas such as gas stations, supermarkets, harware stores, and such. This is the second harvest we have sourced coffees from CoopeTarrazu and we are very excited for this partnership.  They´re just starting to explore the potential in the micro-regions of Tarrazu! -Piero Cristiani 
Costa Rica SHB Tarrazu Café Vida (GrainPro) 6657 69kg 275 OPEN origin Toffee and chocolate with citric acidity. Toffee and chocolate with citric acidity. Coffee has been cultivated in Costa Rica since 1779.  Currently, the regions producing the best quality are Tarrazu, West Valley, and Central Valley.  Coffee production has been threatened in the past decade due to a real-estate boom, converting coffee-lands into prime development properties.  San Jose, the capital, is right in the heart of Central Valley where you will find private houses next to coffee farms.  The value of these farms have now skyrocketed. CoopeTarrazu RL Coope Tarrazu RL was founded in 1960 with a capital investment of $5.800 from 228 small coffee growers. Today, they run the biggest wet mill of Costa Rica, processing more than 110.000 bags of green coffee from 3.000 producers.  About 85% of the producers affiliated to the coop harvest 4 hectares or less. Its success is based on looking after small producer´s interests, and providing other services to its members such as credit, agronomical and technical advice, sustainable prices, fertilizers, among others.  The coop has also diversified about 45% of their portfolio in other areas such as gas stations, supermarkets, harware stores, and such. This is the second harvest we have sourced coffees from CoopeTarrazu and we are very excited for this partnership.  They´re just starting to explore the potential in the micro-regions of Tarrazu! -Piero Cristiani 
Costa Rica SHB Tarrazu Café Vida (GrainPro) 6658 69kg 269 OPEN origin Chocolate with citric acidity and a nutty aftertaste. Chocolate with citric acidity and a nutty aftertaste. Coffee has been cultivated in Costa Rica since 1779.  Currently, the regions producing the best quality are Tarrazu, West Valley, and Central Valley.  Coffee production has been threatened in the past decade due to a real-estate boom, converting coffee-lands into prime development properties.  San Jose, the capital, is right in the heart of Central Valley where you will find private houses next to coffee farms.  The value of these farms have now skyrocketed. CoopeTarrazu RL Coope Tarrazu RL was founded in 1960 with a capital investment of $5.800 from 228 small coffee growers. Today, they run the biggest wet mill of Costa Rica, processing more than 110.000 bags of green coffee from 3.000 producers.  About 85% of the producers affiliated to the coop harvest 4 hectares or less. Its success is based on looking after small producer´s interests, and providing other services to its members such as credit, agronomical and technical advice, sustainable prices, fertilizers, among others.  The coop has also diversified about 45% of their portfolio in other areas such as gas stations, supermarkets, harware stores, and such. This is the second harvest we have sourced coffees from CoopeTarrazu and we are very excited for this partnership.  They´re just starting to explore the potential in the micro-regions of Tarrazu! -Piero Cristiani 
Costa Rica SHB Tarrazu Café Vida (GrainPro) 6659 69kg 275 OPEN origin Coffee has been cultivated in Costa Rica since 1779.  Currently, the regions producing the best quality are Tarrazu, West Valley, and Central Valley.  Coffee production has been threatened in the past decade due to a real-estate boom, converting coffee-lands into prime development properties.  San Jose, the capital, is right in the heart of Central Valley where you will find private houses next to coffee farms.  The value of these farms have now skyrocketed. CoopeTarrazu RL Coope Tarrazu RL was founded in 1960 with a capital investment of $5.800 from 228 small coffee growers. Today, they run the biggest wet mill of Costa Rica, processing more than 110.000 bags of green coffee from 3.000 producers.  About 85% of the producers affiliated to the coop harvest 4 hectares or less. Its success is based on looking after small producer´s interests, and providing other services to its members such as credit, agronomical and technical advice, sustainable prices, fertilizers, among others.  The coop has also diversified about 45% of their portfolio in other areas such as gas stations, supermarkets, harware stores, and such. This is the second harvest we have sourced coffees from CoopeTarrazu and we are very excited for this partnership.  They´re just starting to explore the potential in the micro-regions of Tarrazu! -Piero Cristiani 
Costa Rica SHB Tarrazu Café Vida (GrainPro) 6660 69kg 275 OPEN origin Coffee has been cultivated in Costa Rica since 1779.  Currently, the regions producing the best quality are Tarrazu, West Valley, and Central Valley.  Coffee production has been threatened in the past decade due to a real-estate boom, converting coffee-lands into prime development properties.  San Jose, the capital, is right in the heart of Central Valley where you will find private houses next to coffee farms.  The value of these farms have now skyrocketed. CoopeTarrazu RL Coope Tarrazu RL was founded in 1960 with a capital investment of $5.800 from 228 small coffee growers. Today, they run the biggest wet mill of Costa Rica, processing more than 110.000 bags of green coffee from 3.000 producers.  About 85% of the producers affiliated to the coop harvest 4 hectares or less. Its success is based on looking after small producer´s interests, and providing other services to its members such as credit, agronomical and technical advice, sustainable prices, fertilizers, among others.  The coop has also diversified about 45% of their portfolio in other areas such as gas stations, supermarkets, harware stores, and such. This is the second harvest we have sourced coffees from CoopeTarrazu and we are very excited for this partnership.  They´re just starting to explore the potential in the micro-regions of Tarrazu! -Piero Cristiani 
Costa Rica Spl Cat 200 Community Coffees - La Trinidad (GrainPro) 6492 69kg 255 OPEN origin The Community Coffee program with Coopetarrazu has made a real impact on the communities that deliver cherry to this mill.  This program has allowed us to separate out lots from specific communities that score over 86 points and pay a quality premium that the individual communities get to receive and decide as a group how the money will be used to improve their coffee production and their livelihood.  We have seen the premiums used to build roads, build large water tanks to store fresh water for the community, building roofs for the children’s schools, and many other projects that have had a direct impact on these communities.  This program has motivated these producers to keep upping their quality, and we are very excited to see that this year’s harvest has been very impressive. Some of the best individual producers in Costa Rica used to deliver their cherry to cooperatives, and in an effort to segregate their own production and quality, opened their own operation.  But there are still many producers of that caliber who still deliver cherry to cooperatives.  This is where Coopetarrazu comes in. Microlots in cooperatives can be controversial, but Coopetarrazu has made a commitment that they want to improve the lives of their members and offer them the opportunity of gaining higher quality premiums for their best coffees.  This is why CoopeTarrazu developed the Community Coffees project: in which cherry is collected from the peak of the harvest from high-altitude communities and has traceability to the  community or micro-region, as opposed to a Generic SHB Tarrazu.   The results of this program have been phenomenal.  We are very proud to partner with Coopetarrazu on this project and support these hard working producers. For more photos from Costa Rica CLICK HERE
Costa Rica Spl Cat 200 Community Coffees - La Trinidad (GrainPro) 6493 69kg 275 OPEN origin The Community Coffee program with Coopetarrazu has made a real impact on the communities that deliver cherry to this mill.  This program has allowed us to separate out lots from specific communities that score over 86 points and pay a quality premium that the individual communities get to receive and decide as a group how the money will be used to improve their coffee production and their livelihood.  We have seen the premiums used to build roads, build large water tanks to store fresh water for the community, building roofs for the children’s schools, and many other projects that have had a direct impact on these communities.  This program has motivated these producers to keep upping their quality, and we are very excited to see that this year’s harvest has been very impressive. Some of the best individual producers in Costa Rica used to deliver their cherry to cooperatives, and in an effort to segregate their own production and quality, opened their own operation.  But there are still many producers of that caliber who still deliver cherry to cooperatives.  This is where Coopetarrazu comes in. Microlots in cooperatives can be controversial, but Coopetarrazu has made a commitment that they want to improve the lives of their members and offer them the opportunity of gaining higher quality premiums for their best coffees.  This is why CoopeTarrazu developed the Community Coffees project: in which cherry is collected from the peak of the harvest from high-altitude communities and has traceability to the  community or micro-region, as opposed to a Generic SHB Tarrazu.   The results of this program have been phenomenal.  We are very proud to partner with Coopetarrazu on this project and support these hard working producers. For more photos from Costa Rica CLICK HERE
Costa Rica Spl Cat 200 Community Coffees - El Higueron (GrainPro) 6494 69kg 275 OPEN origin The Community Coffee program with Coopetarrazu has made a real impact on the communities that deliver cherry to this mill.  This program has allowed us to separate out lots from specific communities that score over 86 points and pay a quality premium that the individual communities get to receive and decide as a group how the money will be used to improve their coffee production and their livelihood.  We have seen the premiums used to build roads, build large water tanks to store fresh water for the community, building roofs for the children’s schools, and many other projects that have had a direct impact on these communities.  This program has motivated these producers to keep upping their quality, and we are very excited to see that this year’s harvest has been very impressive. Some of the best individual producers in Costa Rica used to deliver their cherry to cooperatives, and in an effort to segregate their own production and quality, opened their own operation.  But there are still many producers of that caliber who still deliver cherry to cooperatives.  This is where Coopetarrazu comes in. Microlots in cooperatives can be controversial, but Coopetarrazu has made a commitment that they want to improve the lives of their members and offer them the opportunity of gaining higher quality premiums for their best coffees.  This is why CoopeTarrazu developed the Community Coffees project: in which cherry is collected from the peak of the harvest from high-altitude communities and has traceability to the  community or micro-region, as opposed to a Generic SHB Tarrazu.   The results of this program have been phenomenal!  We are very proud to partner with Coopetarrazu on this project and support these hard working producers. For more photos from Costa Rica CLICK HERE
Costa Rica Spl Cat 200 Community Coffees - Zapotal (GrainPro) 6495 69kg 275 OPEN origin The Community Coffee program with Coopetarrazu has made a real impact on the communities that deliver cherry to this mill.  This program has allowed us to separate out lots from specific communities that score over 86 points and pay a quality premium that the individual communities get to receive and decide as a group how the money will be used to improve their coffee production and their livelihood.  We have seen the premiums used to build roads, build large water tanks to store fresh water for the community, building roofs for the children’s schools, and many other projects that have had a direct impact on these communities.  This program has motivated these producers to keep upping their quality, and we are very excited to see that this year’s harvest has been very impressive. Some of the best individual producers in Costa Rica used to deliver their cherry to cooperatives, and in an effort to segregate their own production and quality, opened their own operation.  But there are still many producers of that caliber who still deliver cherry to cooperatives.  This is where Coopetarrazu comes in. Microlots in cooperatives can be controversial, but Coopetarrazu has made a commitment that they want to improve the lives of their members and offer them the opportunity of gaining higher quality premiums for their best coffees.  This is why CoopeTarrazu developed the Community Coffees project: in which cherry is collected from the peak of the harvest from high-altitude communities and has traceability to the  community or micro-region, as opposed to a Generic SHB Tarrazu.   The results of this program have been phenomenal!  We are very proud to partner with Coopetarrazu on this project and support these hard working producers. For more photos from Costa Rica CLICK HERE
Costa Rica Spl Cat 200 Community Coffees - Parritilla (GrainPro) 6496 69kg 275 OPEN origin The Community Coffee program with Coopetarrazu has made a real impact on the communities that deliver cherry to this mill.  This program has allowed us to separate out lots from specific communities that score over 86 points and pay a quality premium that the individual communities get to receive and decide as a group how the money will be used to improve their coffee production and their livelihood.  We have seen the premiums used to build roads, build large water tanks to store fresh water for the community, building roofs for the children’s schools, and many other projects that have had a direct impact on these communities.  This program has motivated these producers to keep upping their quality, and we are very excited to see that this year’s harvest has been very impressive. Some of the best individual producers in Costa Rica used to deliver their cherry to cooperatives, and in an effort to segregate their own production and quality, opened their own operation.  But there are still many producers of that caliber who still deliver cherry to cooperatives.  This is where Coopetarrazu comes in. Microlots in cooperatives can be controversial, but Coopetarrazu has made a commitment that they want to improve the lives of their members and offer them the opportunity of gaining higher quality premiums for their best coffees.  This is why CoopeTarrazu developed the Community Coffees project: in which cherry is collected from the peak of the harvest from high-altitude communities and has traceability to the  community or micro-region, as opposed to a Generic SHB Tarrazu.   The results of this program have been phenomenal.  We are very proud to partner with Coopetarrazu on this project and support these hard working producers. For more photos from Costa Rica CLICK HERE
Costa Rica Spl Cat 200 Community Coffees - Parritilla (GrainPro) 6497 69kg 275 OPEN origin The Community Coffee program with Coopetarrazu has made a real impact on the communities that deliver cherry to this mill.  This program has allowed us to separate out lots from specific communities that score over 86 points and pay a quality premium that the individual communities get to receive and decide as a group how the money will be used to improve their coffee production and their livelihood.  We have seen the premiums used to build roads, build large water tanks to store fresh water for the community, building roofs for the children’s schools, and many other projects that have had a direct impact on these communities.  This program has motivated these producers to keep upping their quality, and we are very excited to see that this year’s harvest has been very impressive. Some of the best individual producers in Costa Rica used to deliver their cherry to cooperatives, and in an effort to segregate their own production and quality, opened their own operation.  But there are still many producers of that caliber who still deliver cherry to cooperatives.  This is where Coopetarrazu comes in. Microlots in cooperatives can be controversial, but Coopetarrazu has made a commitment that they want to improve the lives of their members and offer them the opportunity of gaining higher quality premiums for their best coffees.  This is why CoopeTarrazu developed the Community Coffees project: in which cherry is collected from the peak of the harvest from high-altitude communities and has traceability to the  community or micro-region, as opposed to a Generic SHB Tarrazu.   The results of this program have been phenomenal.  We are very proud to partner with Coopetarrazu on this project and support these hard working producers. For more photos from Costa Rica CLICK HERE
Costa Rica Spl Cat 200 Community Coffees - San Francisco (GrainPro) 6498 69kg 275 OPEN origin The Community Coffee program with Coopetarrazu has made a real impact on the communities that deliver cherry to this mill.  This program has allowed us to separate out lots from specific communities that score over 86 points and pay a quality premium that the individual communities get to receive and decide as a group how the money will be used to improve their coffee production and their livelihood.  We have seen the premiums used to build roads, build large water tanks to store fresh water for the community, building roofs for the children’s schools, and many other projects that have had a direct impact on these communities.  This program has motivated these producers to keep upping their quality, and we are very excited to see that this year’s harvest has been very impressive. Some of the best individual producers in Costa Rica used to deliver their cherry to cooperatives, and in an effort to segregate their own production and quality, opened their own operation.  But there are still many producers of that caliber who still deliver cherry to cooperatives.  This is where Coopetarrazu comes in. Microlots in cooperatives can be controversial, but Coopetarrazu has made a commitment that they want to improve the lives of their members and offer them the opportunity of gaining higher quality premiums for their best coffees.  This is why CoopeTarrazu developed the Community Coffees project: in which cherry is collected from the peak of the harvest from high-altitude communities and has traceability to the  community or micro-region, as opposed to a Generic SHB Tarrazu.   The results of this program have been phenomenal.  We are very proud to partner with Coopetarrazu on this project and support these hard working producers. For more photos from Costa Rica CLICK HERE
Costa Rica Spl Cat 200 Community Coffees - San Antonio (GrainPro) 6499 69kg 275 OPEN origin The Community Coffee program with Coopetarrazu has made a real impact on the communities that deliver cherry to this mill.  This program has allowed us to separate out lots from specific communities that score over 86 points and pay a quality premium that the individual communities get to receive and decide as a group how the money will be used to improve their coffee production and their livelihood.  We have seen the premiums used to build roads, build large water tanks to store fresh water for the community, building roofs for the children’s schools, and many other projects that have had a direct impact on these communities.  This program has motivated these producers to keep upping their quality, and we are very excited to see that this year’s harvest has been very impressive. Some of the best individual producers in Costa Rica used to deliver their cherry to cooperatives, and in an effort to segregate their own production and quality, opened their own operation.  But there are still many producers of that caliber who still deliver cherry to cooperatives.  This is where Coopetarrazu comes in. Microlots in cooperatives can be controversial, but Coopetarrazu has made a commitment that they want to improve the lives of their members and offer them the opportunity of gaining higher quality premiums for their best coffees.  This is why CoopeTarrazu developed the Community Coffees project: in which cherry is collected from the peak of the harvest from high-altitude communities and has traceability to the  community or micro-region, as opposed to a Generic SHB Tarrazu.   The results of this program have been phenomenal.  We are very proud to partner with Coopetarrazu on this project and support these hard working producers. For more photos from Costa Rica CLICK HERE
Costa Rica Spl Cat 200 Community Coffees - La Esperanza (GrainPro) 6500 69kg 275 OPEN origin The Community Coffee program with Coopetarrazu has made a real impact on the communities that deliver cherry to this mill.  This program has allowed us to separate out lots from specific communities that score over 86 points and pay a quality premium that the individual communities get to receive and decide as a group how the money will be used to improve their coffee production and their livelihood.  We have seen the premiums used to build roads, build large water tanks to store fresh water for the community, building roofs for the children’s schools, and many other projects that have had a direct impact on these communities.  This program has motivated these producers to keep upping their quality, and we are very excited to see that this year’s harvest has been very impressive. Some of the best individual producers in Costa Rica used to deliver their cherry to cooperatives, and in an effort to segregate their own production and quality, opened their own operation.  But there are still many producers of that caliber who still deliver cherry to cooperatives.  This is where Coopetarrazu comes in. Microlots in cooperatives can be controversial, but Coopetarrazu has made a commitment that they want to improve the lives of their members and offer them the opportunity of gaining higher quality premiums for their best coffees.  This is why CoopeTarrazu developed the Community Coffees project: in which cherry is collected from the peak of the harvest from high-altitude communities and has traceability to the  community or micro-region, as opposed to a Generic SHB Tarrazu.   The results of this program have been phenomenal.  We are very proud to partner with Coopetarrazu on this project and support these hard working producers. For more photos from Costa Rica CLICK HERE
Costa Rica Spl Cat 200 Community Coffees - La Angostura (GrainPro) 6501 69kg 275 OPEN origin The Community Coffee program with Coopetarrazu has made a real impact on the communities that deliver cherry to this mill.  This program has allowed us to separate out lots from specific communities that score over 86 points and pay a quality premium that the individual communities get to receive and decide as a group how the money will be used to improve their coffee production and their livelihood.  We have seen the premiums used to build roads, build large water tanks to store fresh water for the community, building roofs for the children’s schools, and many other projects that have had a direct impact on these communities.  This program has motivated these producers to keep upping their quality, and we are very excited to see that this year’s harvest has been very impressive. Some of the best individual producers in Costa Rica used to deliver their cherry to cooperatives, and in an effort to segregate their own production and quality, opened their own operation.  But there are still many producers of that caliber who still deliver cherry to cooperatives.  This is where Coopetarrazu comes in. Microlots in cooperatives can be controversial, but Coopetarrazu has made a commitment that they want to improve the lives of their members and offer them the opportunity of gaining higher quality premiums for their best coffees.  This is why CoopeTarrazu developed the Community Coffees project: in which cherry is collected from the peak of the harvest from high-altitude communities and has traceability to the  community or micro-region, as opposed to a Generic SHB Tarrazu.   The results of this program have been phenomenal. We are very proud to partner with Coopetarrazu on this project and support these hard working producers. For more photos from Costa Rica CLICK HERE
Costa Rica
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Spl Cat 300 Honey Process - Small Holder Select Lot - SHB (GrainPro) 7329 69kg 45 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric with peanut.
Costa Rica
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Spl Cat 400 Small Holder Select Lot - SHB (GrainPro) 7330 69kg 72 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric, nutty and chocolate.
Ecuador
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Fair Trade Organic 1 Organic - Non Fair Trade ACRIM - Taza Dorada #4 - FLO ID 2406 (GrainPro) 7072 69kg 7 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Floral and lemon flavors with balanced acidity and a mild, nutty aftertaste.
Ecuador
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Microlot 1 Maputo - Rancho Tio Emilio - Typica (GrainPro) 6866 50kg 4 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Perfumed florals with sweet and tart cherry flavors, lemon candy, complex acidity and a bergamot aftertaste. Perfumed florals with sweet and tart cherry flavors, lemon candy, complex acidity and a bergamot aftertaste. Ecuador has great potential and is one of my favorite origins for being exotic but also having the quality to back it up; the big issue we see at the moment is volume. The country as a whole only exports 100 containers/year (40,000 lbs/container) of Washed Arabica. Café Imports alone moves more than 100 containers/year. The rest of the coffee Ecuador produces is low quality Naturals and Robusta to sustain its huge instant coffee market for internal consumption and exports. To put this into perspective: Origin Country / Containers per Year (estimate) Colombia / 32,000 Peru / 12,000 Bolivia / 300 Ecuador / 100 Maputo is located in La Perla, Nanegal in the up and coming region of North-West of Pichincha Province in the North of Ecuador in proximity to Colombia. The area where this farm is located has a very particular microclimate, that even though it’s only at 1350 masl, it produces 88+ coffee. Humidity levels are high and mist usually covers the coffee fields in the afternoons and temperatures at night drop significantly with respect to temperatures during the day. Maputo is owned and operated by Henry and Verena Gaibor. Henry, a veteran surgeon and war doctor and Verena a midwife; they met in Bujumbura, Burundi while volunteering for Doctors Without Borders and United Nations. They have since retired and dedicated to producing some of the best coffee I’ve tasted. Henry is extremely methodical with his coffee production and is just as dedicated and passionate as he once was with his profession. He is doing everything right when it comes to picking, processing, and drying and has his farm divided into different lots with different varieties (Typica, SL28, Bourbon, Kaffa, and Caturra). Maputo is a very new farm with only three years in production and is quickly growing year over year. Henry recently acquired the neighboring farm, La Nube, which will add significantly to next year’s production. I’m extremely excited to be working with Henry and Verena for their dedication to producing stellar coffees! -Piero Cristiani
Ecuador
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Microlot 1 Maputo - La Nube - Typica (GrainPro) 6867 50kg 17 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Floral and cherry flavors with a complex savory aftertaste and caramelly sweetness. Floral and cherry flavors with a complex savory aftertaste and caramelly sweetness. Ecuador has great potential and is one of my favorite origins for being exotic but also having the quality to back it up; the big issue we see at the moment is volume. The country as a whole only exports 100 containers/year (40,000 lbs/container) of Washed Arabica. Café Imports alone moves more than 100 containers/year. The rest of the coffee Ecuador produces is low quality Naturals and Robusta to sustain its huge instant coffee market for internal consumption and exports. To put this into perspective: Origin Country / Containers per Year (estimate) Colombia / 32,000 Peru / 12,000 Bolivia / 300 Ecuador / 100 Maputo is located in La Perla, Nanegal in the up and coming region of North-West of Pichincha Province in the North of Ecuador in proximity to Colombia. The area where this farm is located has a very particular microclimate, that even though it’s only at 1350 masl, it produces 88+ coffee. Humidity levels are high and mist usually covers the coffee fields in the afternoons and temperatures at night drop significantly with respect to temperatures during the day. Maputo is owned and operated by Henry and Verena Gaibor. Henry, a veteran surgeon and war doctor and Verena a midwife; they met in Bujumbura, Burundi while volunteering for Doctors Without Borders and United Nations. They have since retired and dedicated to producing some of the best coffee I’ve tasted. Henry is extremely methodical with his coffee production and is just as dedicated and passionate as he once was with his profession. He is doing everything right when it comes to picking, processing, and drying and has his farm divided into different lots with different varieties (Typica, SL28, Bourbon, Kaffa, and Caturra). Maputo is a very new farm with only three years in production and is quickly growing year over year. Henry recently acquired the neighboring farm, La Nube, which will add significantly to next year’s production. I’m extremely excited to be working with Henry and Verena for their dedication to producing stellar coffees! -Piero Cristiani
Ecuador
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Microlot 5 Maputo - Caturra - Taza Dorada #2 (GrainPro) 7140 50kg 8 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Tart lime acidity, ginger snaps and chocolate. Tart lime acidity, ginger snaps and chocolate. Ecuador has great potential and is one of my favorite origins for being exotic but also having the quality to back it up; the big issue we see at the moment is volume. The country as a whole only exports 100 containers/year (40,000 lbs/container) of Washed Arabica. Café Imports alone moves more than 100 containers/year. The rest of the coffee Ecuador produces is low quality Naturals and Robusta to sustain its huge instant coffee market for internal consumption and exports. To put this into perspective: Origin Country / Containers per Year (estimate) Colombia / 32,000 Peru / 12,000 Bolivia / 300 Ecuador / 100 Maputo is located in La Perla, Nanegal in the up and coming region of North-West of Pichincha Province in the North of Ecuador in proximity to Colombia. The area where this farm is located has a very particular microclimate, that even though it’s only at 1350 masl, it produces 88+ coffee. Humidity levels are high and mist usually covers the coffee fields in the afternoons and temperatures at night drop significantly with respect to temperatures during the day. Maputo is owned and operated by Henry and Verena Gaibor. Henry, a veteran surgeon and war doctor and Verena a midwife; they met in Bujumbura, Burundi while volunteering for Doctors Without Borders and United Nations. They have since retired and dedicated to producing some of the best coffee I’ve tasted. Henry is extremely methodical with his coffee production and is just as dedicated and passionate as he once was with his profession. He is doing everything right when it comes to picking, processing, and drying and has his farm divided into different lots with different varieties (Typica, SL28, Bourbon, Kaffa, and Caturra). Maputo is a very new farm with only three years in production and is quickly growing year over year. Henry recently acquired the neighboring farm, La Nube, which will add significantly to next year’s production. I’m extremely excited to be working with Henry and Verena for their dedication to producing stellar coffees! -Piero Cristiani
Ecuador
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Microlot 6 Maputo - Rancho Tio Emilio - Typica (GrainPro) 7141 50kg 8 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us floral and sweet with tart lime and cinnamon; lemon acidity. floral and sweet with tart lime and cinnamon; lemon acidity. Ecuador has great potential and is one of my favorite origins for being exotic but also having the quality to back it up; the big issue we see at the moment is volume. The country as a whole only exports 100 containers/year (40,000 lbs/container) of Washed Arabica. Café Imports alone moves more than 100 containers/year. The rest of the coffee Ecuador produces is low quality Naturals and Robusta to sustain its huge instant coffee market for internal consumption and exports. To put this into perspective: Origin Country / Containers per Year (estimate) Colombia / 32,000 Peru / 12,000 Bolivia / 300 Ecuador / 100 Maputo is located in La Perla, Nanegal in the up and coming region of North-West of Pichincha Province in the North of Ecuador in proximity to Colombia. The area where this farm is located has a very particular microclimate, that even though it’s only at 1350 masl, it produces 88+ coffee. Humidity levels are high and mist usually covers the coffee fields in the afternoons and temperatures at night drop significantly with respect to temperatures during the day. Maputo is owned and operated by Henry and Verena Gaibor. Henry, a veteran surgeon and war doctor and Verena a midwife; they met in Bujumbura, Burundi while volunteering for Doctors Without Borders and United Nations. They have since retired and dedicated to producing some of the best coffee I’ve tasted. Henry is extremely methodical with his coffee production and is just as dedicated and passionate as he once was with his profession. He is doing everything right when it comes to picking, processing, and drying and has his farm divided into different lots with different varieties (Typica, SL28, Bourbon, Kaffa, and Caturra). Maputo is a very new farm with only three years in production and is quickly growing year over year. Henry recently acquired the neighboring farm, La Nube, which will add significantly to next year’s production. I’m extremely excited to be working with Henry and Verena for their dedication to producing stellar coffees! -Piero Cristiani
Ecuador
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Microlot 7 Pablo & Jaime Ponce - Typica - Taza Dorada #3 (GrainPro) 6894 50kg 28 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Delicate and perfumed, bergamot and lemon with tart acidity.
Ecuador
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Microlot 7 Pablo & Jaime Ponce - Typica - Taza Dorada #3 (GrainPro) 7143 50kg 24 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Toffee, floral and lemon; smooth.
Ecuador Organic 1 Organic - Non Fair Trade Fair Trade Organic FAPECAFES - FLO ID 2406 (GrainPro) 6461 69kg 250 OPEN origin Ecuador has great potential and is one of my favorite origins for being exotic but also having the quality to back it up; the big issue we see at the moment is volume.  The country as a whole only exports 100 containers/year (40,000 lbs/container) of Washed Arabica.  Café Imports alone moves more than 100 containers/year.  The rest of the coffee Ecuador produces is low quality Naturals and Robusta to sustain its huge instant coffee market for internal consumption and exports.  To put this into perspective: Origin Country / Containers per Year (estimate) Colombia / 32,000 Peru / 12,000 Bolivia / 300 Ecuador / 100 This lot comes from a small association in the south of Ecuador bordering the Peruvian border.  This association is part of a bigger federation.  The association has a great leadership and this has helped them position themselves as a top player in Ecuadorian coffee.  They've won and placed in Taza Dorada multiple times.   The producers in this area still have traditional varieties such as Typica, Caturra, and Bourbon which has been key to their success.  Rust has been an issue for most of these producers and having organic certification limits the products you can apply to your farm making it tougher. The micro-climate in this area is very particular.  It is very wet almost year-round and has good temperature fluctuations from 12 - 28 degrees Celsius with an average of 20 degrees.  This weather is ideal for coffee growing and it reflects in the cup. The South of Ecuador has small-holders with 1.5 hectares on average.  While in the North we see larger farms. Typical Southern farms will be organic and extremely diverse with flowers, corn, cabbages, bananas, bees, cows, fish, fruits, and coffee.  A big challenge these farmers are facing at the moment is leaf rust.  This decimated plantations in Colombia bringing their production down 50% in a couple of years.  The easiest solution for leaf-rust is intensive chemical applications but their respect for the environment makes them take the harder organic route.  Also, plant nutrition in Ecuador is extremely low due to little fertilization.  This affects cup quality and yields from parchment to green coffee. Farms in the North are bigger, at 15 hectares or more.  They use conventional fertilizers and are in better shape in general; the area is extremely lush and in very moist conditions with a nice warm summer creating good conditions for growing coffee.  This area is extremely interesting, you will find: ancient indigenous tombs, a vineyard, and an experimental variety farm ran by NESPRESSO. -Piero Cristiani
Ecuador
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Organic 3 Organic - Non Fair Trade APECAP - Bracamoros Coffee (GrainPro) 7073 69kg 7 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Nut brittle and tart citrus acidity. Nut brittle and tart citrus acidity. Ecuador has great potential and is one of my favorite origins for being exotic but also having the quality to back it up; the big issue we see at the moment is volume.  The country as a whole only exports 100 containers/year (40,000 lbs/container) of Washed Arabica.  Café Imports alone moves more than 100 containers/year.  The rest of the coffee Ecuador produces is low quality Naturals and Robusta to sustain its huge instant coffee market for internal consumption and exports.  To put this into perspective: Origin Country / Containers per Year (estimate) Colombia / 32,000 Peru / 12,000 Bolivia / 300 Ecuador / 100 The producers in this area still have tradiditional varieties such as Typica, Caturra, and Bourbon which has been key to their success.  Rust has been an issue for most of these producers and having organic certification limits the products you can apply to your farm making it tougher. The micro-climate in this area is very particular.  It is very wet almost year-round and has good temperature fluctuations from 12 - 28 degrees Celsius with an average of 20 degrees.  This weather is ideal for coffee growing and it reflects in the cup. The South of Ecuador has small-holders with 1.5 hectares on average.  While in the North we see larger farms. Typical Southern farms will be organic and extremely diverse with flowers, corn, cabbages, bananas, bees, cows, fish, fruits, and coffee.  A big challenge these farmers are facing at the moment is leaf rust.  This decimated plantations in Colombia bringing their production down 50% in a couple of years.  The easiest solution for leaf-rust is intensive chemical applications but their respect for the environment makes them take the harder organic route.  Also, plant nutrition in Ecuador is extremely low due to little fertilization.  This affects cup quality and yields from parchment to green coffee. Farms in the North are bigger, at 15 hectares or more.  They use conventional fertilizers and are in better shape in general; the area is extremely lush and in very moist conditions with a nice warm summer creating good conditions for growing coffee.  This area is extremely interesting, you will find: ancient indigenous tombs, a vineyard, and an experimental variety farm ran by NESPRESSO. -Piero Cristiani
Ecuador
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Organic 5 Organic - Non Fair Trade PROCAFEQ - Bracamoros Coffee (GrainPro) 7075 69kg 6 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Chocolate with tart citric acidity and a nutty aftertaste. Chocolate with tart citric acidity and a nutty aftertaste. Ecuador has great potential and is one of my favorite origins for being exotic but also having the quality to back it up; the big issue we see at the moment is volume.  The country as a whole only exports 100 containers/year (40,000 lbs/container) of Washed Arabica.  Café Imports alone moves more than 100 containers/year.  The rest of the coffee Ecuador produces is low quality Naturals and Robusta to sustain its huge instant coffee market for internal consumption and exports.  To put this into perspective: Origin Country / Containers per Year (estimate) Colombia / 32,000 Peru / 12,000 Bolivia / 300 Ecuador / 100 The producers in this area still have tradiditional varieties such as Typica, Caturra, and Bourbon which has been key to their success.  Rust has been an issue for most of these producers and having organic certification limits the products you can apply to your farm making it tougher. The micro-climate in this area is very particular.  It is very wet almost year-round and has good temperature fluctuations from 12 - 28 degrees Celsius with an average of 20 degrees.  This weather is ideal for coffee growing and it reflects in the cup. The South of Ecuador has small-holders with 1.5 hectares on average.  While in the North we see larger farms. Typical Southern farms will be organic and extremely diverse with flowers, corn, cabbages, bananas, bees, cows, fish, fruits, and coffee.  A big challenge these farmers are facing at the moment is leaf rust.  This decimated plantations in Colombia bringing their production down 50% in a couple of years.  The easiest solution for leaf-rust is intensive chemical applications but their respect for the environment makes them take the harder organic route.  Also, plant nutrition in Ecuador is extremely low due to little fertilization.  This affects cup quality and yields from parchment to green coffee. Farms in the North are bigger, at 15 hectares or more.  They use conventional fertilizers and are in better shape in general; the area is extremely lush and in very moist conditions with a nice warm summer creating good conditions for growing coffee.  This area is extremely interesting, you will find: ancient indigenous tombs, a vineyard, and an experimental variety farm ran by NESPRESSO. -Piero Cristiani
El Salvador Arabica (GrainPro) 7434 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
El Salvador Microlot Las Nubes (GrainPro) 6697 69kg 275 OPEN origin Coffee was first cultivated in El Salvador in the 19th century, and it its beginnings it was only for domestic consumption. In the middle on the century, the government encouraged the people giving tax breaks, exemption from military service for coffee workers and elimination of export duties for new producers. By 1880, coffee was an exportable product and was becoming more important to the economy. Coffee production flourished throughout the 20th century, reaching its peak in the late 1970s. By 1980, coffee was responsible for the 50% of the gross domestic product. The civil war of 1980 affected the production of coffee and the production was decreased. Ending the civil war, Salvadorian producers started investing on technology in the farms, and also new coffee varieties were planted and The Institution of Coffee was created. All of these important factors, helped to develop the coffee industry. And in the following years coffee production is an important economic factor in El Salvador. Las Nubes Farm Las Nubes was purchased by Isidro Batlle in the 1920's and remains in the family. He liked to purchase high-altitude farms like Las Nubes and Kilimanjaro.
El Salvador Microlot Las Nubes - Honey/Natural/Kenya Washed (GrainPro) 6700 69kg 275 OPEN origin Coffee was first cultivated in El Salvador in the 19th century, and it its beginnings it was only for domestic consumption. In the middle on the century, the government encouraged the people giving tax breaks, exemption from military service for coffee workers and elimination of export duties for new producers. By 1880, coffee was an exportable product and was becoming more important to the economy. Coffee production flourished throughout the 20th century, reaching its peak in the late 1970s. By 1980, coffee was responsible for the 50% of the gross domestic product. The civil war of 1980 affected the production of coffee and the production was decreased. Ending the civil war, Salvadorian producers started investing on technology in the farms, and also new coffee varieties were planted and The Institution of Coffee was created. All of these important factors, helped to develop the coffee industry. And in the following years coffee production is an important economic factor in El Salvador. Las Nubes Farm Las Nubes was purchased by Isidro Batlle in the 1920's and remains in the family. He liked to purchase high-altitude farms like Las Nubes and Kilimanjaro.
El Salvador
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Microlot 1 El Pireo (GrainPro) 6388 69kg 7 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Clean and balanced with toffee and some lemon. Clean and balanced with toffee and some lemon. El Pireo has been a family farm for five generations. The family has a tradition of being coffee producers, and know who to produce quality coffee. The farm is located in the canton El Duraznillo, in the departament of Santa Ana. The slopes of the Volcano Las Ranas are the house of the farm. Coffee is produced under shade.
El Salvador Microlot 4 Las Nubes - Washed (GrainPro) 6696 69kg 275 OPEN origin Coffee was first cultivated in El Salvador in the 19th century, and it its beginnings it was only for domestic consumption. In the middle on the century, the government encouraged the people giving tax breaks, exemption from military service for coffee workers and elimination of export duties for new producers. By 1880, coffee was an exportable product and was becoming more important to the economy. Coffee production flourished throughout the 20th century, reaching its peak in the late 1970s. By 1980, coffee was responsible for the 50% of the gross domestic product. The civil war of 1980 affected the production of coffee and the production was decreased. Ending the civil war, Salvadorian producers started investing on technology in the farms, and also new coffee varieties were planted and The Institution of Coffee was created. All of these important factors, helped to develop the coffee industry. And in the following years coffee production is an important economic factor in El Salvador. Las Nubes Farm Las Nubes was purchased by Isidro Batlle in the 1920's and remains in the family. He liked to purchase high-altitude farms like Las Nubes and Kilimanjaro.
El Salvador Microlot 4 Las Nubes - Washed (GrainPro) 6698 69kg 275 OPEN origin Coffee was first cultivated in El Salvador in the 19th century, and it its beginnings it was only for domestic consumption. In the middle on the century, the government encouraged the people giving tax breaks, exemption from military service for coffee workers and elimination of export duties for new producers. By 1880, coffee was an exportable product and was becoming more important to the economy. Coffee production flourished throughout the 20th century, reaching its peak in the late 1970s. By 1980, coffee was responsible for the 50% of the gross domestic product. The civil war of 1980 affected the production of coffee and the production was decreased. Ending the civil war, Salvadorian producers started investing on technology in the farms, and also new coffee varieties were planted and The Institution of Coffee was created. All of these important factors, helped to develop the coffee industry. And in the following years coffee production is an important economic factor in El Salvador. Las Nubes Farm Las Nubes was purchased by Isidro Batlle in the 1920's and remains in the family. He liked to purchase high-altitude farms like Las Nubes and Kilimanjaro.
El Salvador Microlot 4 Las Nubes - Washed (GrainPro) 6699 69kg 275 OPEN origin Coffee was first cultivated in El Salvador in the 19th century, and it its beginnings it was only for domestic consumption. In the middle on the century, the government encouraged the people giving tax breaks, exemption from military service for coffee workers and elimination of export duties for new producers. By 1880, coffee was an exportable product and was becoming more important to the economy. Coffee production flourished throughout the 20th century, reaching its peak in the late 1970s. By 1980, coffee was responsible for the 50% of the gross domestic product. The civil war of 1980 affected the production of coffee and the production was decreased. Ending the civil war, Salvadorian producers started investing on technology in the farms, and also new coffee varieties were planted and The Institution of Coffee was created. All of these important factors, helped to develop the coffee industry. And in the following years coffee production is an important economic factor in El Salvador. Las Nubes Farm Las Nubes was purchased by Isidro Batlle in the 1920's and remains in the family. He liked to purchase high-altitude farms like Las Nubes and Kilimanjaro.
El Salvador Pacamara Finca Himalaya (GrainPro) 7061 69kg 13 OPEN   origin
El Salvador Spl Cat 200 Potrero Grande - (GrainPro) 6925 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
El Salvador Spl Cat 200 Potrero Grande - (GrainPro) 6926 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
El Salvador Spl Cat 200 Buenos Aires - (GrainPro) 6927 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
El Salvador
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Spl Cat 500 Toño Ticas - Yellow Catuai - Honey (GrainPro) 6538 69kg 3 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Juicy with savory fruit, cherry and caramel flavor Juicy with savory fruit, cherry and caramel flavor Coffee was first cultivated in El Salvador in the 19th century, and it its beginnings it was only for domestic consumption. In the middle on the century, the government encouraged the people giving tax breaks, exemption from military service for coffee workers and elimination of export duties for new producers. By 1880, coffee was an exportable product and was becoming more important to the economy. Coffee production flourished throughout the 20th century, reaching its peak in the late 1970s. By 1980, coffee was responsible for the 50% of the gross domestic product. The civil war of 1980 affected the production of coffee and the production was decreased. Ending the civil war, Salvadorian producers started investing on technology in the farms, and also new coffee varieties were planted and The Institution of Coffee was created. All of these important factors, helped to develop the coffee industry. And in the following years coffee production is an important economic factor in El Salvador.
Ethiopia
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Decaf Coffein MC Decaf - Non FT or Org Sidama 5446 60kg 19 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric and nut.
Ethiopia
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Decaf Coffein MC Decaf - Non FT or Org Sidama 6580 60kg 19 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Lemon and nutty.
Ethiopia Decaf MWP Decaf - Non FT or Org Natural Sidama 7390 60kg 70 IN TRANSIT TO MSP afloat Citric with graham cracker.
Ethiopia
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FTO Yirgacheffe Fair Trade Organic Negele Gorbitu FLO ID 897 5885 60kg 31 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us A floral nose and lemon, bergamot, and chocolate cups. A floral nose and lemon, bergamot, and chocolate cups. The Negele Gorbitu Coop is a part of the Oromia Cooperative Union in Sidamo, Ethiopia. This part of Ethiopia is extremely mountainous, with altitudes reaching above 2200m The coop resides in Borena, Sidamo They have their own washing station where the coffee is wet milled. Their process includes a 48 hour wet fermentation then dry on raised beds. This is an outstanding FTO Ethiopian option, and we are proud to partner with them again this year!
Ethiopia FTO Yirgacheffe 1 Fair Trade Organic Konga Grade 2 - YCFCU FLO ID 2520 (GrainPro) 7184 60kg 320 OPEN origin YCFCU Konga is the Primary Cooperative for YCFCU, with 2372 producers, contributing to 16 containers annual production. Average YCFCU co-op farmer has .7 hectares YCFCU Konga processing: 48-72 hours wet fermentation,1 day Predry, 8-13 days for drying 4 localities of YCFCU Konga include: Wote, Seda, Birbis, and Kella Average price is 14-15 birr/kg of red cherry The YCFCU (Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union) was organized in 2002 in an effort to establish stability amidst fluxuating coffee prices. Recognized under the national labor union, the YCFCUrepresents 43,794 farmers over 6 districts includingYirgacheffe,Gedeb, Wanago, Dilla Zuria, Bule, and Kochere. Shortly after this the Ethiopian government, in support of small producers, added coffee into the Ethiopian Commodities Exchange (ECX). This would allow, amongst many things, for farmers to get paid in a timely manner. The nature of exchanges is to homogenize a product and sell it at a market price hence it doesn’t allow for premiums to be paid for a superior product. With this we saw a decline in quality. Cooperatives, like Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union (YCFCU), are exempt from going through the ECX. We are working alongside YCFCU to pay premiums for better cherry selection at the washing station level to bring back the classic Yirgacheffe profile that was obscured for some years. From Yirgacheffeunion.com: The Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperatives Union (YCFCU), currently represents over 43,794 farmers belonging to more than 300,000 families, and was established in June 2002. Its currently 23 member cooperatives are all located in Gedeo, southern Ethiopia. This area is in a region that is famous for coffee growing in the country.The 62,004 hectares gardens that are dedicated to coffee alone, on average produce 9,000 tons of Yirgacheffe and 3,000 tons of Sidamo washed coffee each year. The area also produces 24,000 tons of sun-dried coffee annually. The Ethiopian traditional coffee growing method is mainly manifested among the Yirgacheffe coffee growing farmers. While the protection and handling of the coffee is carried out on a manual basis, the development is being done with the use of organic natural fertilizers. Pests are controlled by using the Biological natural means. In this manner, the development work is done through the application of the age -old cultural traditional means rather than the artificial modern pest, insect and weeds control by chemical and fertilizers. The Ethiopian traditional coffee growing method is mainly manifested among the Yirgacheffe coffee growing farmers. While the protection and handling of the coffee is carried out on a manual basis, the development is being done with the use of organic natural fertilizers. Pests are controlled by using the Biological natural means. In this manner, the development work is done through the application of the age -old cultural traditional means rather than the artificial modern pest, insect and weeds control by chemical and fertilizers.
Ethiopia FTO Yirgacheffe 1 Fair Trade Organic Konga Grade 2 - YCFCU FLO ID 2520 (GrainPro) 7185 60kg 320 OPEN origin Delicate and soft with perfumed floral, chocolate, lime and orange candy flavors. Delicate and soft with perfumed floral, chocolate, lime and orange candy flavors. YCFCU Konga is the Primary Cooperative for YCFCU, with 2372 producers, contributing to 16 containers annual production. Average YCFCU co-op farmer has .7 hectares YCFCU Konga processing: 48-72 hours wet fermentation,1 day Predry, 8-13 days for drying 4 localities of YCFCU Konga include: Wote, Seda, Birbis, and Kella Average price is 14-15 birr/kg of red cherry The YCFCU (Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union) was organized in 2002 in an effort to establish stability amidst fluxuating coffee prices. Recognized under the national labor union, the YCFCUrepresents 43,794 farmers over 6 districts includingYirgacheffe,Gedeb, Wanago, Dilla Zuria, Bule, and Kochere. Shortly after this the Ethiopian government, in support of small producers, added coffee into the Ethiopian Commodities Exchange (ECX). This would allow, amongst many things, for farmers to get paid in a timely manner. The nature of exchanges is to homogenize a product and sell it at a market price hence it doesn’t allow for premiums to be paid for a superior product. With this we saw a decline in quality. Cooperatives, like Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union (YCFCU), are exempt from going through the ECX. We are working alongside YCFCU to pay premiums for better cherry selection at the washing station level to bring back the classic Yirgacheffe profile that was obscured for some years. From Yirgacheffeunion.com: The Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperatives Union (YCFCU), currently represents over 43,794 farmers belonging to more than 300,000 families, and was established in June 2002. Its currently 23 member cooperatives are all located in Gedeo, southern Ethiopia. This area is in a region that is famous for coffee growing in the country.The 62,004 hectares gardens that are dedicated to coffee alone, on average produce 9,000 tons of Yirgacheffe and 3,000 tons of Sidamo washed coffee each year. The area also produces 24,000 tons of sun-dried coffee annually. The Ethiopian traditional coffee growing method is mainly manifested among the Yirgacheffe coffee growing farmers. While the protection and handling of the coffee is carried out on a manual basis, the development is being done with the use of organic natural fertilizers. Pests are controlled by using the Biological natural means. In this manner, the development work is done through the application of the age -old cultural traditional means rather than the artificial modern pest, insect and weeds control by chemical and fertilizers. The Ethiopian traditional coffee growing method is mainly manifested among the Yirgacheffe coffee growing farmers. While the protection and handling of the coffee is carried out on a manual basis, the development is being done with the use of organic natural fertilizers. Pests are controlled by using the Biological natural means. In this manner, the development work is done through the application of the age -old cultural traditional means rather than the artificial modern pest, insect and weeds control by chemical and fertilizers.
Ethiopia FTO Yirgacheffe 1 Fair Trade Organic Adado Grade 2 - YCFCU FLO ID 2520 (GrainPro) 7186 60kg 320 OPEN origin The ancestral tribe surrounding this YCFCU co-op in the Gedeo Zone of Yirgacheffe is called "Adado", which where the co-op gets its name. there are 8 mills in the Adado region with about 7000 farmers. The Adado region produces 20-30 containers annually. The YCFCU (Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union) was organized in 2002 in an effort to establish stability amidst fluxuating coffee prices. Recognized under the national labor union, the YCFCUrepresents 43,794 farmers over 6 districts including Yirgacheffe, Gedeb, Wanago, Dilla Zuria, Bule, and Kochere. Shortly after this the Ethiopian government, in support of small producers, added coffee into the Ethiopian Commodities Exchange (ECX). This would allow, amongst many things, for farmers to get paid in a timely manner. The nature of exchanges is to homogenize a product and sell it at a market price hence it doesn’t allow for premiums to be paid for a superior product. With this we saw a decline in quality. Cooperatives, like Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union (YCFCU), are exempt from going through the ECX. We are working alongside YCFCU to pay premiums for better cherry selection at the washing station level to bring back the classic Yirgacheffe profile that was obscured for some years. From Yirgacheffeunion.com: The Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperatives Union (YCFCU), currently represents over 43,794 farmers belonging to more than 300,000 families, and was established in June 2002. Its currently 23 member cooperatives are all located in Gedeo, southern Ethiopia. This area is in a region that is famous for coffee growing in the country.The 62,004 hectares gardens that are dedicated to coffee alone, on average produce 9,000 tons of Yirgacheffe and 3,000 tons of Sidamo washed coffee each year. The area also produces 24,000 tons of sun-dried coffee annually. The Ethiopian traditional coffee growing method is mainly manifested among the Yirgacheffe coffee growing farmers. While the protection and handling of the coffee is carried out on a manual basis, the development is being done with the use of organic natural fertilizers. Pests are controlled by using the Biological natural means. In this manner, the development work is done through the application of the age -old cultural traditional means rather than the artificial modern pest, insect and weeds control by chemical and fertilizers. The Ethiopian traditional coffee growing method is mainly manifested among the Yirgacheffe coffee growing farmers. While the protection and handling of the coffee is carried out on a manual basis, the development is being done with the use of organic natural fertilizers. Pests are controlled by using the Biological natural means. In this manner, the development work is done through the application of the age -old cultural traditional means rather than the artificial modern pest, insect and weeds control by chemical and fertilizers.
Ethiopia FTO Yirgacheffe 1 Fair Trade Organic Natural Biloya Grade 3 - YCFCU FLO ID 2520 (GrainPro) 7187 60kg 320 OPEN origin The YCFCU (Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union) was organized in 2002 in an effort to establish stability amidst fluxuating coffee prices. Recognized under the national labor union, the YCFCUrepresents 43,794 farmers over 6 districts including Yirgacheffe, Gedeb, Wanago, Dilla Zuria, Bule, and Kochere. Shortly after this the Ethiopian government, in support of small producers, added coffee into the Ethiopian Commodities Exchange (ECX). This would allow, amongst many things, for farmers to get paid in a timely manner. The nature of exchanges is to homogenize a product and sell it at a market price hence it doesn’t allow for premiums to be paid for a superior product. With this we saw a decline in quality. Cooperatives, like Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union (YCFCU), are exempt from going through the ECX. We are working alongside YCFCU to pay premiums for better cherry selection at the washing station level to bring back the classic Yirgacheffe profile that was obscured for some years. From Yirgacheffeunion.com: The Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperatives Union (YCFCU), currently represents over 43,794 farmers belonging to more than 300,000 families, and was established in June 2002. Its currently 23 member cooperatives are all located in Gedeo, southern Ethiopia. This area is in a region that is famous for coffee growing in the country.The 62,004 hectares gardens that are dedicated to coffee alone, on average produce 9,000 tons of Yirgacheffe and 3,000 tons of Sidamo washed coffee each year. The area also produces 24,000 tons of sun-dried coffee annually. The Ethiopian traditional coffee growing method is mainly manifested among the Yirgacheffe coffee growing farmers. While the protection and handling of the coffee is carried out on a manual basis, the development is being done with the use of organic natural fertilizers. Pests are controlled by using the Biological natural means. In this manner, the development work is done through the application of the age -old cultural traditional means rather than the artificial modern pest, insect and weeds control by chemical and fertilizers. The Ethiopian traditional coffee growing method is mainly manifested among the Yirgacheffe coffee growing farmers. While the protection and handling of the coffee is carried out on a manual basis, the development is being done with the use of organic natural fertilizers. Pests are controlled by using the Biological natural means. In this manner, the development work is done through the application of the age -old cultural traditional means rather than the artificial modern pest, insect and weeds control by chemical and fertilizers.
Ethiopia FTO Yirgacheffe 1 Fair Trade Organic Natural Harfusa Grade 3 - YCFCU FLO ID 2520 (GrainPro) 7188 60kg 320 OPEN origin Harfusa cooperative was established in 1975 and is a member of YCFCU, the Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union. At last count, there are 843 members. Typically, the average small holder farmers owns around .7 of a HA and producers around 450 kgs of exportable coffee. The YCFCU (Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union) was organized in 2002 in an effort to establish stability amidst fluxuating coffee prices. Recognized under the national labor union, the YCFCUrepresents 43,794 farmers over 6 districts including Yirgacheffe, Gedeb, Wanago, Dilla Zuria, Bule, and Kochere. Shortly after this the Ethiopian government, in support of small producers, added coffee into the Ethiopian Commodities Exchange (ECX). This would allow, amongst many things, for farmers to get paid in a timely manner. The nature of exchanges is to homogenize a product and sell it at a market price hence it doesn’t allow for premiums to be paid for a superior product. With this we saw a decline in quality. Cooperatives, like Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union (YCFCU), are exempt from going through the ECX. We are working alongside YCFCU to pay premiums for better cherry selection at the washing station level to bring back the classic Yirgacheffe profile that was obscured for some years. From Yirgacheffeunion.com: The Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperatives Union (YCFCU), currently represents over 43,794 farmers belonging to more than 300,000 families, and was established in June 2002. Its currently 23 member cooperatives are all located in Gedeo, southern Ethiopia. This area is in a region that is famous for coffee growing in the country.The 62,004 hectares gardens that are dedicated to coffee alone, on average produce 9,000 tons of Yirgacheffe and 3,000 tons of Sidamo washed coffee each year. The area also produces 24,000 tons of sun-dried coffee annually. The Ethiopian traditional coffee growing method is mainly manifested among the Yirgacheffe coffee growing farmers. While the protection and handling of the coffee is carried out on a manual basis, the development is being done with the use of organic natural fertilizers. Pests are controlled by using the Biological natural means. In this manner, the development work is done through the application of the age -old cultural traditional means rather than the artificial modern pest, insect and weeds control by chemical and fertilizers. The Ethiopian traditional coffee growing method is mainly manifested among the Yirgacheffe coffee growing farmers. While the protection and handling of the coffee is carried out on a manual basis, the development is being done with the use of organic natural fertilizers. Pests are controlled by using the Biological natural means. In this manner, the development work is done through the application of the age -old cultural traditional means rather than the artificial modern pest, insect and weeds control by chemical and fertilizers. For pictures of Yirgacheffe, dry mill and YCFCU cupping clickhere
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Natural Sidama Grd 4   6924 60kg 249 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Nut and fruit, floral, and heavy.
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Natural Sidama Grd 4   7062 60kg 204 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Pulpy fruit and nut.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Gelana Abaya (GrainPro) 7265 60kg 80 OPEN origin Gelana Abaya Local tribe: Tore Language: Omoromic Number of producers: 9000-10,000 Annual Production: 100+ containers Average farm size: 3.5 hectares Number of mills in the area: 5 Processing: Coffee is covered during the hottest part of the day,Lots of fresh compost used in this area. Composting takes 3 months Gelana Abaya is another gem of a region in Yirga Cheffe region. This area is nestled between Lake Abaya on the west and the town of Yirgacheffe on the East. There is a lot of debate about natural coffees, but one thing that I do know is that it takes an amazing origin to shine through the intense flavour profile that comes from the natural process. Gelana Abaya has that intensity of cup to pair intrinsic bean with process! Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Chelchele (GrainPro) 7266 60kg 40 OPEN origin ChelChele is a microregion of Yirgacheffe Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Aricha (GrainPro) 7267 60kg 50 OPEN origin Aricha is located 8km NorthWest of Yirga Cheffe, this is a new washing station we are working with this year. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Kochere (GrainPro) 7268 60kg 150 OPEN origin Kochere: Local tribe: Hama # of washing stations: 15 # of farmers: 25,000 Average farm size: 5 hectares Avg. annual production: 100 containers Kochere is southwest of the town of Yirga Cheffe and near a little village of Ch'elelek'tu in the Gedeo zone. While a "classic" Yirga coffee, all of the sub regions tend to have different flavour profiles. Adado - stone fruit, Konga - citrus and stone fruit, and for Kochere, it is a strong fruit tea that comes along with the citrus and stone fruit. When this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is expressed as red currant, lime, and raspberry lemonade. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varieties exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Adado (GrainPro) 7269 60kg 150 OPEN origin Adado Our Adado Coffees are from the Gedeo zone, and are named after the local tribe "Adado". The region iscomprised of 7000 farmers, contributing to 8 Mills and exports 20-30 containers annually. Adado is my favorite micro region of Yirga Cheffe. Stone fruit, and lots of it, is the predominant flavour profile of this area. Apricots and peaches with supportive citrus and floral higher tones come together in a delightful cup. The natural process of these lots really complement the typical profile of the washed coffee beautifully. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Gelana Abaya (GrainPro) 7270 60kg 150 OPEN origin Gelana Abaya Local tribe: Tore Language: Omoromic Number of producers: 9000-10,000 Annual Production: 100+ containers Average farm size: 3.5 hectares Number of mills in the area: 5 Processing: Coffee is covered during the hottest part of the day,Lots of fresh compost used in this area. Composting takes 3 months Gelana Abaya is another gem of a region in Yirga Cheffe region. This area is nestled between Lake Abaya on the west and the town of Yirgacheffe on the East. There is a lot of debate about natural coffees, but one thing that I do know is that it takes an amazing origin to shine through the intense flavour profile that comes from the natural process. Gelana Abaya has that intensity of cup to pair intrinsic bean with process! Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Aricha (GrainPro) 7271 60kg 120 OPEN origin Aricha is located 8km NorthWest of Yirga Cheffe, this is a new washing station we are working with this year. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Gelana Abaya (GrainPro) 7273 60kg 10 OPEN origin Gelana Abaya Local tribe: Tore Language: Omoromic Number of producers: 9000-10,000 Annual Production: 100+ containers Average farm size: 3.5 hectares Number of mills in the area: 5 Processing: Coffee is covered during the hottest part of the day,Lots of fresh compost used in this area. Composting takes 3 months Gelana Abaya is another gem of a region in Yirga Cheffe region. This area is nestled between Lake Abaya on the west and the town of Yirgacheffe on the East. There is a lot of debate about natural coffees, but one thing that I do know is that it takes an amazing origin to shine through the intense flavour profile that comes from the natural process. Gelana Abaya has that intensity of cup to pair intrinsic bean with process! Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Kochere (GrainPro) 7274 60kg 150 OPEN origin Kochere: Local tribe: Hama # of washing stations: 15 # of farmers: 25,000 Average farm size: 5 hectares Avg. annual production: 100 containers Kochere is southwest of the town of Yirga Cheffe and near a little village of Ch'elelek'tu in the Gedeo zone. While a "classic" Yirga coffee, all of the sub regions tend to have different flavour profiles. Adado - stone fruit, Konga - citrus and stone fruit, and for Kochere, it is a strong fruit tea that comes along with the citrus and stone fruit. When this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is expressed as red currant, lime, and raspberry lemonade. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varieties exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Chelchele (GrainPro) 7275 60kg 70 OPEN origin ChelChele is a microregion of Yirgacheffe Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Adado (GrainPro) 7276 60kg 130 OPEN origin Adado Our Adado Coffees are from the Gedeo zone, and are named after the local tribe "Adado". The region iscomprised of 7000 farmers, contributing to 8 Mills and exports 20-30 containers annually. Adado is my favorite micro region of Yirga Cheffe. Stone fruit, and lots of it, is the predominant flavour profile of this area. Apricots and peaches with supportive citrus and floral higher tones come together in a delightful cup. The natural process of these lots really complement the typical profile of the washed coffee beautifully. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Beriti (GrainPro) 7277 60kg 100 OPEN   origin
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Chelchele (GrainPro) 7278 60kg 50 OPEN origin ChelChele is a microregion of Yirgacheffe Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Adado (GrainPro) 7291 60kg 300 OPEN origin Adado Our Adado Coffees are from the Gedeo zone, and are named after the local tribe "Adado". The region iscomprised of 7000 farmers, contributing to 8 Mills and exports 20-30 containers annually. Adado is my favorite micro region of Yirga Cheffe. Stone fruit, and lots of it, is the predominant flavour profile of this area. Apricots and peaches with supportive citrus and floral higher tones come together in a delightful cup. The natural process of these lots really complement the typical profile of the washed coffee beautifully. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Konga (GrainPro) 7292 60kg 300 OPEN origin Konga Zone: Gedeo Local tribe: Konga Sede District: Yirgacheffe # of farmers : 5000 # of mills: 10 Amount of coffee processed at one mill: 5 containers washed, 4 natural Avg annual production: 40-50 containers Avg employees per mil: 474 Other crops: banana and corn Altitude: 1800-2100 Processing: Wet fermentation for 6 hours then post fermentation wash24 hour pre-dry,Then dry on african beds for 7-10 days Konga is about four kilometers south of the town of Yirga Cheffe and nearby both Harfusa and Biloya. We've always liked the Konga micro region of Yirgacheffee for both its strong citrus (mostly lemon this year) and supportive stonefruit flavors of peach and apricot and when this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is dried cherry, cranberry, and lemonade like acidity. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee -The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Aricha (GrainPro) 7293 60kg 100 OPEN origin Aricha is located 8km NorthWest of Yirga Cheffe, this is a new washing station we are working with this year. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Beriti (GrainPro) 7294 60kg 200 OPEN   origin
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Chelchele (GrainPro) 7295 60kg 140 OPEN origin ChelChele is a microregion of Yirgacheffe Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Gelana Abaya (GrainPro) 7296 60kg 130 OPEN origin Gelana Abaya Local tribe: Tore Language: Omoromic Number of producers: 9000-10,000 Annual Production: 100+ containers Average farm size: 3.5 hectares Number of mills in the area: 5 Processing: Coffee is covered during the hottest part of the day,Lots of fresh compost used in this area. Composting takes 3 months Gelana Abaya is another gem of a region in Yirga Cheffe region. This area is nestled between Lake Abaya on the west and the town of Yirgacheffe on the East. There is a lot of debate about natural coffees, but one thing that I do know is that it takes an amazing origin to shine through the intense flavour profile that comes from the natural process. Gelana Abaya has that intensity of cup to pair intrinsic bean with process! Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
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Org Yirgacheffe Organic - Non Fair Trade Birhanu (GrainPro) 6230 60kg 28 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Creamy with milk chocolate, lime and buttermilk flavor. Creamy with milk chocolate, lime and buttermilk flavor. For farmer's photograph click here This is a microlot from a small-producer out of Ethiopia.  While it is common to see small-producer specific lots in Central and South America it is not in East Africa.  In part, is due to the smaller sized farms in East Africa and their lots and production being too small to make it practical to be "kept separate".  It is common to see estate (large plantations) specific lots out of Ethiopia but these are rare.  Cafe Imports and YCFCU are proud of this achievement and happy to be able to provide this type of traceability. Producer's Name: Birhanu Bali Jilo Age: 58 Children: 6 sons / 4 daughters Farm size: 12.5 ha Labor Type: Family  Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union (YCFCU) YCFCU has around 50,000 farmers in 24 cooperatives.  They harvest coffee from December through February.  Most farms in Ethiopia are from small-holders on 0.7 ha of land on average. During my short coffee career I’ve seen quality of Ethiopian coffee spike and tank and spike back up.  I hope this spike is here to stay! Ethiopian coffee is so tasty and unique it has to be one of my favorite origins.  The floral taste notes and citric acidity complement each other so well that it makes it a refreshing drink.  My most memorable experience in coffee was with a sundried Ethiopian while working at a local coffee shop in the Twin Cities.  This was a natural Yirgacheffe in the Summer of 2009.  I had no idea coffee could taste so different from what I was used to in washed coffees.  I remember intense blueberries and strawberries in the flavor with a delicate floral aftertaste.  This was a very pristine and complex cup which opened my eyes as to what coffee could offer. Shortly after this the Ethiopian government, in support of small producers, added coffee into the Ethiopian Commodities Exchange (ECX).  This would allow, amongst many things, for farmers to get paid in a timely manner.  The nature of exchanges is to homogenize a product and sell it at a market price hence it doesn’t allow for premiums to be paid for a superior product.  With this we saw a decline in quality. Cooperatives, like Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union (YCFCU), are exempt from going through the ECX.  We are working alongside YCFCU to pay premiums for better cherry selection at the washing station level to bring back the classic Yirgacheffe profile that was obscured for some years. -Piero
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Spl Cat 100 Grade 1 Natural Yirgacheffe - Adado (GrainPro) 6021 60kg 61 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Crisp citrus and white wine acids with perfumed florals, plum jam and fruity flavors. Crisp citrus and white wine acids with perfumed florals, plum jam and fruity flavors. Adado Our Adado Coffees are from the Gedeo zone, and are named after the local tribe "Adado". The region iscomprised of 7000 farmers, contributing to 8 Mills and exports 20-30 containers annually. Adado is my favorite micro region of Yirga Cheffe. Stone fruit, and lots of it, is the predominant flavour profile of this area. Apricots and peaches with supportive citrus and floral higher tones come together in a delightful cup. The natural process of these lots really complement the typical profile of the washed coffee beautifully. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
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Spl Cat 100 Grade 1 Natural Yirgacheffe - Gelana Abaya (GrainPro) 6022 60kg 102 CALM Melbourne melbourne-au Clean tart cherry, blueberry, lime, floral and caramel with crisp winey and malic acidity. Clean tart cherry, blueberry, lime, floral and caramel with crisp winey and malic acidity. Gelana Abaya Local tribe: Tore Language: Omoromic Number of producers: 9000-10,000 Annual Production: 100+ containers Average farm size: 3.5 hectares Number of mills in the area: 5 Processing: Coffee is covered during the hottest part of the day,Lots of fresh compost used in this area. Composting takes 3 months Gelana Abaya is another gem of a region in Yirga Cheffe region. This area is nestled between Lake Abaya on the west and the town of Yirgacheffe on the East. There is a lot of debate about natural coffees, but one thing that I do know is that it takes an amazing origin to shine through the intense flavour profile that comes from the natural process. Gelana Abaya has that intensity of cup to pair intrinsic bean with process! Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
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Spl Cat 100 Grade 1 Natural Yirgacheffe - Kochere (GrainPro) 6024 60kg 54 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Complex winey acids and mild florals, bing cherry, bubblegum and a crisp, clean aftertaste. Complex winey acids and mild florals, bing cherry, bubblegum and a crisp, clean aftertaste. Kochere: Local tribe: Hama # of washing stations: 15 # of farmers: 25,000 Average farm size: 5 hectares Avg. annual production: 100 containers Kochere is southwest of the town of Yirga Cheffe and near a little village of Ch'elelek'tu in the Gedeo zone. While a "classic" Yirga coffee, all of the sub regions tend to have different flavour profiles. Adado - stone fruit, Konga - citrus and stone fruit, and for Kochere, it is a strong fruit tea that comes along with the citrus and stone fruit. When this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is expressed as red currant, lime, and raspberry lemonade. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varieties exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
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Spl Cat 200 Grade 1 Natural Yirgacheffe - Kochere (GrainPro) 6025 60kg 109 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Lively and crisp with sparkling acidity; very floral, cotton candy and clean berry flavors. Lively and crisp with sparkling acidity; very floral, cotton candy and clean berry flavors. Kochere: Local tribe: Hama # of washing stations: 15 # of farmers: 25,000 Average farm size: 5 hectares Avg. annual production: 100 containers Kochere is southwest of the town of Yirga Cheffe and near a little village of Ch'elelek'tu in the Gedeo zone. While a "classic" Yirga coffee, all of the sub regions tend to have different flavour profiles. Adado - stone fruit, Konga - citrus and stone fruit, and for Kochere, it is a strong fruit tea that comes along with the citrus and stone fruit. When this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is expressed as red currant, lime, and raspberry lemonade. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varieties exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Wash Yirgacheffe Gr ECX 7114 60kg 204 AT DOCK afloat Smooth, transparent, floral and toffee. Smooth, transparent, floral and toffee. Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Wash Yirgacheffe Gr ECX 7350 60kg 220 OPEN origin Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
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Washed Yirgacheffe Adado (GrainPro) 5890 60kg 108 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Lively acids, intense citrus with a crisp mouth feel and floral, peach, apricot and white grape flavors. Lively acids, intense citrus with a crisp mouth feel and floral, peach, apricot and white grape flavors. Adado Our Adado Coffees are from the Gedeo zone, and are named after the local tribe "Adado". The region iscomprised of 7000 farmers, contributing to 8 Mills and exports 20-30 containers annually. Adado is my favorite micro region of Yirga Cheffe. Stone fruit, and lots of it, is the predominant flavour profile of this area. Apricots and peaches with supportive citrus and floral higher tones come together in a delightful cup. The natural process of these lots really complement the typical profile of the washed coffee beautifully. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia
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Washed Yirgacheffe Konga (GrainPro) 5894 60kg 1 CALM Melbourne melbourne-au Balanced, perfumey cups with crisp tartaric acidity, jasmine and chamomile flavors. Balanced, perfumey cups with crisp tartaric acidity, jasmine and chamomile flavors. Konga Zone: Gedeo Local tribe: Konga Sede District: Yirgacheffe # of farmers : 5000 # of mills: 10 Amount of coffee processed at one mill: 5 containers washed, 4 natural Avg annual production: 40-50 containers Avg employees per mil: 474 Other crops: banana and corn Altitude: 1800-2100 Processing: Wet fermentation for 6 hours then post fermentation wash24 hour pre-dry,Then dry on african beds for 7-10 days Konga is about four kilometers south of the town of Yirga Cheffe and nearby both Harfusa and Biloya. We've always liked the Konga micro region of Yirgacheffee for both its strong citrus (mostly lemon this year) and supportive stonefruit flavors of peach and apricot and when this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is dried cherry, cranberry, and lemonade like acidity. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee -The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Chelchele (GrainPro) 7252 60kg 100 OPEN origin Complex and creamy with floral, apricot, sweet and savory flavors; citric and malic acidity. Complex and creamy with floral, apricot, sweet and savory flavors; citric and malic acidity. ChelChele is a microregion of Yirgacheffe Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Aricha (GrainPro) 7253 60kg 100 OPEN origin Perfumed floral aromatics and sparkling limeade cups with a caramel aftertaste. Perfumed floral aromatics and sparkling limeade cups with a caramel aftertaste. Aricha is located 8km NorthWest of Yirga Cheffe, this is a new washing station we are working with this year. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Kochere (GrainPro) 7254 60kg 100 OPEN origin Syrupy apricot and sweet-tart Meyer lemon with tangy acidity and saturated sweetness. Syrupy apricot and sweet-tart Meyer lemon with tangy acidity and saturated sweetness. Kochere: Local tribe: Hama # of washing stations: 15 # of farmers: 25,000 Average farm size: 5 hectares Avg. annual production: 100 containers Kochere is southwest of the town of Yirga Cheffe and near a little village of Ch'elelek'tu in the Gedeo zone. While a "classic" Yirga coffee, all of the sub regions tend to have different flavour profiles. Adado - stone fruit, Konga - citrus and stone fruit, and for Kochere, it is a strong fruit tea that comes along with the citrus and stone fruit. When this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is expressed as red currant, lime, and raspberry lemonade. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varieties exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Adado (GrainPro) 7255 60kg 150 OPEN origin Creamy and tart with caramel, chamomile, white grape and apple. Creamy and tart with caramel, chamomile, white grape and apple. Adado Our Adado Coffees are from the Gedeo zone, and are named after the local tribe "Adado". The region iscomprised of 7000 farmers, contributing to 8 Mills and exports 20-30 containers annually. Adado is my favorite micro region of Yirga Cheffe. Stone fruit, and lots of it, is the predominant flavour profile of this area. Apricots and peaches with supportive citrus and floral higher tones come together in a delightful cup. The natural process of these lots really complement the typical profile of the washed coffee beautifully. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Aricha (GrainPro) 7256 60kg 150 OPEN origin Aricha is located 8km NorthWest of Yirga Cheffe, this is a new washing station we are working with this year. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Konga (GrainPro) 7257 60kg 150 OPEN origin Tart tartaric acidity with sweet, floral, grapefruit and orange tea flavor. Tart tartaric acidity with sweet, floral, grapefruit and orange tea flavor. Konga Zone: Gedeo Local tribe: Konga Sede District: Yirgacheffe # of farmers : 5000 # of mills: 10 Amount of coffee processed at one mill: 5 containers washed, 4 natural Avg annual production: 40-50 containers Avg employees per mil: 474 Other crops: banana and corn Altitude: 1800-2100 Processing: Wet fermentation for 6 hours then post fermentation wash24 hour pre-dry,Then dry on african beds for 7-10 days Konga is about four kilometers south of the town of Yirga Cheffe and nearby both Harfusa and Biloya. We've always liked the Konga micro region of Yirgacheffee for both its strong citrus (mostly lemon this year) and supportive stonefruit flavors of peach and apricot and when this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is dried cherry, cranberry, and lemonade like acidity. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee -The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Chelchele (GrainPro) 7258 60kg 150 OPEN origin Complex and creamy with floral, apricot, sweet and savory flavors; citric and malic acidity. Complex and creamy with floral, apricot, sweet and savory flavors; citric and malic acidity. ChelChele is a microregion of Yirgacheffe Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Konga (GrainPro) 7259 60kg 70 OPEN origin Tart tartaric acidity with sweet, floral, grapefruit and orange tea flavor. Tart tartaric acidity with sweet, floral, grapefruit and orange tea flavor. Konga Zone: Gedeo Local tribe: Konga Sede District: Yirgacheffe # of farmers : 5000 # of mills: 10 Amount of coffee processed at one mill: 5 containers washed, 4 natural Avg annual production: 40-50 containers Avg employees per mil: 474 Other crops: banana and corn Altitude: 1800-2100 Processing: Wet fermentation for 6 hours then post fermentation wash24 hour pre-dry,Then dry on african beds for 7-10 days Konga is about four kilometers south of the town of Yirga Cheffe and nearby both Harfusa and Biloya. We've always liked the Konga micro region of Yirgacheffee for both its strong citrus (mostly lemon this year) and supportive stonefruit flavors of peach and apricot and when this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is dried cherry, cranberry, and lemonade like acidity. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee -The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Adado (GrainPro) 7262 60kg 116 OPEN origin Creamy and tart with caramel, chamomile, white grape and apple. Creamy and tart with caramel, chamomile, white grape and apple. Adado Our Adado Coffees are from the Gedeo zone, and are named after the local tribe "Adado". The region iscomprised of 7000 farmers, contributing to 8 Mills and exports 20-30 containers annually. Adado is my favorite micro region of Yirga Cheffe. Stone fruit, and lots of it, is the predominant flavour profile of this area. Apricots and peaches with supportive citrus and floral higher tones come together in a delightful cup. The natural process of these lots really complement the typical profile of the washed coffee beautifully. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Adado (GrainPro) 7279 60kg 280 OPEN origin Adado Our Adado Coffees are from the Gedeo zone, and are named after the local tribe "Adado". The region iscomprised of 7000 farmers, contributing to 8 Mills and exports 20-30 containers annually. Adado is my favorite micro region of Yirga Cheffe. Stone fruit, and lots of it, is the predominant flavour profile of this area. Apricots and peaches with supportive citrus and floral higher tones come together in a delightful cup. The natural process of these lots really complement the typical profile of the washed coffee beautifully. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Adado (GrainPro) 7280 60kg 300 OPEN origin Adado Our Adado Coffees are from the Gedeo zone, and are named after the local tribe "Adado". The region iscomprised of 7000 farmers, contributing to 8 Mills and exports 20-30 containers annually. Adado is my favorite micro region of Yirga Cheffe. Stone fruit, and lots of it, is the predominant flavour profile of this area. Apricots and peaches with supportive citrus and floral higher tones come together in a delightful cup. The natural process of these lots really complement the typical profile of the washed coffee beautifully. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Aricha (GrainPro) 7281 60kg 300 OPEN origin Aricha is located 8km NorthWest of Yirga Cheffe, this is a new washing station we are working with this year. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Beriti (GrainPro) 7282 60kg 300 AFLOAT afloat Rich, sweet floral and herbal with tart/ lively tartaric acidity and brown sugar sweetness.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Kochere (GrainPro) 7283 60kg 250 OPEN origin Kochere: Local tribe: Hama # of washing stations: 15 # of farmers: 25,000 Average farm size: 5 hectares Avg. annual production: 100 containers Kochere is southwest of the town of Yirga Cheffe and near a little village of Ch'elelek'tu in the Gedeo zone. While a "classic" Yirga coffee, all of the sub regions tend to have different flavour profiles. Adado - stone fruit, Konga - citrus and stone fruit, and for Kochere, it is a strong fruit tea that comes along with the citrus and stone fruit. When this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is expressed as red currant, lime, and raspberry lemonade. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varieties exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Konga (GrainPro) 7284 60kg 270 OPEN origin Konga Zone: Gedeo Local tribe: Konga Sede District: Yirgacheffe # of farmers : 5000 # of mills: 10 Amount of coffee processed at one mill: 5 containers washed, 4 natural Avg annual production: 40-50 containers Avg employees per mil: 474 Other crops: banana and corn Altitude: 1800-2100 Processing: Wet fermentation for 6 hours then post fermentation wash24 hour pre-dry,Then dry on african beds for 7-10 days Konga is about four kilometers south of the town of Yirga Cheffe and nearby both Harfusa and Biloya. We've always liked the Konga micro region of Yirgacheffee for both its strong citrus (mostly lemon this year) and supportive stonefruit flavors of peach and apricot and when this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is dried cherry, cranberry, and lemonade like acidity. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee -The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Konga (GrainPro) 7285 60kg 300 OPEN origin Konga Zone: Gedeo Local tribe: Konga Sede District: Yirgacheffe # of farmers : 5000 # of mills: 10 Amount of coffee processed at one mill: 5 containers washed, 4 natural Avg annual production: 40-50 containers Avg employees per mil: 474 Other crops: banana and corn Altitude: 1800-2100 Processing: Wet fermentation for 6 hours then post fermentation wash24 hour pre-dry,Then dry on african beds for 7-10 days Konga is about four kilometers south of the town of Yirga Cheffe and nearby both Harfusa and Biloya. We've always liked the Konga micro region of Yirgacheffee for both its strong citrus (mostly lemon this year) and supportive stonefruit flavors of peach and apricot and when this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is dried cherry, cranberry, and lemonade like acidity. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee -The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Adado (GrainPro) 7286 60kg 140 OPEN origin Adado Our Adado Coffees are from the Gedeo zone, and are named after the local tribe "Adado". The region iscomprised of 7000 farmers, contributing to 8 Mills and exports 20-30 containers annually. Adado is my favorite micro region of Yirga Cheffe. Stone fruit, and lots of it, is the predominant flavour profile of this area. Apricots and peaches with supportive citrus and floral higher tones come together in a delightful cup. The natural process of these lots really complement the typical profile of the washed coffee beautifully. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Konga (GrainPro) 7287 60kg 160 OPEN origin Konga Zone: Gedeo Local tribe: Konga Sede District: Yirgacheffe # of farmers : 5000 # of mills: 10 Amount of coffee processed at one mill: 5 containers washed, 4 natural Avg annual production: 40-50 containers Avg employees per mil: 474 Other crops: banana and corn Altitude: 1800-2100 Processing: Wet fermentation for 6 hours then post fermentation wash24 hour pre-dry,Then dry on african beds for 7-10 days Konga is about four kilometers south of the town of Yirga Cheffe and nearby both Harfusa and Biloya. We've always liked the Konga micro region of Yirgacheffee for both its strong citrus (mostly lemon this year) and supportive stonefruit flavors of peach and apricot and when this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is dried cherry, cranberry, and lemonade like acidity. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee -The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Aricha (GrainPro) 7288 60kg 50 OPEN origin Aricha is located 8km NorthWest of Yirga Cheffe, this is a new washing station we are working with this year. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varietals exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares,bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Chelchele (GrainPro) 7289 60kg 50 OPEN origin ChelChele is a microregion of Yirgacheffe Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Grade-1 Kochere (GrainPro) 7290 60kg 200 OPEN origin Kochere: Local tribe: Hama # of washing stations: 15 # of farmers: 25,000 Average farm size: 5 hectares Avg. annual production: 100 containers Kochere is southwest of the town of Yirga Cheffe and near a little village of Ch'elelek'tu in the Gedeo zone. While a "classic" Yirga coffee, all of the sub regions tend to have different flavour profiles. Adado - stone fruit, Konga - citrus and stone fruit, and for Kochere, it is a strong fruit tea that comes along with the citrus and stone fruit. When this is combined with processing as a natural, the result is expressed as red currant, lime, and raspberry lemonade. One of the great things about Ethiopian coffees is the complete mix of varietals. It is estimated that somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand varieties exist naturally in these highlands, the origin of coffee - The cross pollination of genetics is totally amazing. - Jason Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) The ECX was started in 2008 to help protect farmers from market forces that might prevent them from making a living. Most of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by small-holders who own 0.7 hectares, bumper crops often lead to big price drops, which can make it unprofitable for farmers to harvest their coffee. What the ECX does is commoditize grains- including sesame, beans, maize, wheat, and most importantly, coffee. This ensures prompt payment to farmers. It also integrates all parts of the “eco-system” involved in a grains market, including warehousing, grading, trading, and payment. Access to information is emphasized, as farmers can obtain information about trading prices and local delivery points easily through dedicated telephone lines. Here is a general rundown of how the ECX chain works in Ethiopia: Farmers deliver cherry to local wet mills. Some wet mills pay a premium for better quality cherry, some do not. The wet mill then delivers parchment coffee to a delivery station warehouse. In Yirgacheffe, this delivery station is in Dila. Coffees are labeled with a region and then are graded based both on physical qualities as well as cup quality. Higher quality coffee fetches a higher price. Coffee is categorized into 81 generic grades of coffee at the ECX: Processing: Washed, Un-washed, Region: Yirgacheffe, Sidama, Limu, etc. Flavor: A (Representative of region's cup characteristics) B (Less so), Grade: 1-9 (defect count) Tracibility on the coffee an exporter purchases coffee through the ECX will, at most, be labelled as “Yirgacheffe: Konga” or “Sidama: Borena.” Once a specific lot is purchased, it is then shipped to the buyer (typically an exporter in Ethiopia). Full lots come divided in 30 bag chop sub-lots (parchment). Exporters who are buying and selling many containers will cup through the sub-lots to select the top lots and build a full container from these. While this system does ensure prompt payment and streamlines supply chain issues, it removes essentially all traceability from the coffee. This is problematic in the specialty world, where traceability is paramount. The ECX does not allow for complete traceability, but coffee cooperatives in Ethiopia do have the ability to go around the ECX and export the coffee themselves. Coffees that are exported by a cooperative can have traceability, possibly even to a single farmer.
Guatemala
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Decaf KVW MC Decaf - Non FT or Org   6596 60kg 22 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Smooth, lemon and nutty with a very heavy mouthfeel.
Guatemala
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Decaf Origin Select Decaf - Non FT or Org SHB EP Huehuetenango MWP 6174 69kg 81 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Mild, good citric and toffee. Mild, good citric and toffee. This is a Coop specific Guatemalan that have been so pleased with over the years(this coffee is different than themore generic "Huehue Rio Azul"). This lot is from an amazing coop of the same name in the Huehuetenango region. This cup was extremely fruity, with raspberry, blueberry, and other deep red fruits as the prominate notes, supported by a pleasant spice of sage. This coffee has a very delicate mouthfeel, and would be an excellent coffee to feature as a single origin on your drip bar. Definitely worth checking out while it lasts! Productionisaprox 1,750 bags total of which 375 bags of Organic Coffee Organic since 2006, Cooperativa Rio Azul was founded December 12th, 1967. In 1999 it collapsed Due to economic and personal problems, butstarted again in 2004 and Ramon Delgado the current marketing manager of Unitrade,started with the Coop in 2005. Unitrade has been buying their coffee since 2004
Guatemala FTO Huehue Womens Fair Trade Organic CODECH, FLO ID 2892 (GrainPro) 7126 69kg 182 OPEN origin For picture gallery click here and here Average Farm Size: 0.5ha/farm Huehuetenango has been for years one of Guatemala’s prime coffee regions and it continues to be one.  The amount of high-altitude land in this region is very vast and the varieties cultivated are Bourbons or derivatives; both of these are essential to produce quality coffee.  The profile of this cup is very fruity with higher and brighter citric-acidity.  It is also very common to taste some chocolate notes in the background. This year we are also bringing in microlots from CODECH.  These are from higher altitude farms harvested later in the year and from specific associations under the CODECH umbrella. -Piero CODECH (Coordinator of organizations for the development of Concepcion Huista) is located in the municipality of Concepcion Huista in the department of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.  It is comprised of 10 different organizations. CODECH comes to be in August of 1998, through the representatives of the different organizing bodies in search of alternative development programs for Concepcion Huista.  Out of all the organizations 4 of these focus mainly on coffee (organic and conventional). One of CODECH’s main objectives is the participation of women in society and the workforce.    Projects *Organic farming workshops *General agriculture workshops *National and international commercialization workshops *Teacher development workshops *Women specific workshops *Political incidence *Women rights and gender equity *Self esteem *Leadership *Medical attention *Household development *Classes by mail and radio station Gregorio, the general manager of CODECH, is pushing for farmers to renovate their farms.  He thinks they are underproducing at the moment and believes they could be producing about 3 times their current volume on average. His reasoning behind the organic certification is not only to be environmentally friendly but to be independent from transnationals which produce fertilizers.  They are also want independence from the price of oil (used in fertilizers).  Gregorio also believes that there is a growing market for organic products and wants to meet that demand.
Guatemala FTO Huehue Womens Fair Trade Organic CODECH, FLO ID 2892 (GrainPro) 7127 69kg 155 OPEN origin For picture gallery click here and here Average Farm Size: 0.5ha/farm Huehuetenango has been for years one of Guatemala’s prime coffee regions and it continues to be one.  The amount of high-altitude land in this region is very vast and the varieties cultivated are Bourbons or derivatives; both of these are essential to produce quality coffee.  The profile of this cup is very fruity with higher and brighter citric-acidity.  It is also very common to taste some chocolate notes in the background. This year we are also bringing in microlots from CODECH.  These are from higher altitude farms harvested later in the year and from specific associations under the CODECH umbrella. -Piero CODECH (Coordinator of organizations for the development of Concepcion Huista) is located in the municipality of Concepcion Huista in the department of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.  It is comprised of 10 different organizations. CODECH comes to be in August of 1998, through the representatives of the different organizing bodies in search of alternative development programs for Concepcion Huista.  Out of all the organizations 4 of these focus mainly on coffee (organic and conventional). One of CODECH’s main objectives is the participation of women in society and the workforce.    Projects *Organic farming workshops *General agriculture workshops *National and international commercialization workshops *Teacher development workshops *Women specific workshops *Political incidence *Women rights and gender equity *Self esteem *Leadership *Medical attention *Household development *Classes by mail and radio station Gregorio, the general manager of CODECH, is pushing for farmers to renovate their farms.  He thinks they are underproducing at the moment and believes they could be producing about 3 times their current volume on average. His reasoning behind the organic certification is not only to be environmentally friendly but to be independent from transnationals which produce fertilizers.  They are also want independence from the price of oil (used in fertilizers).  Gregorio also believes that there is a growing market for organic products and wants to meet that demand.
Guatemala FTO Huehuete Micro Fair Trade Organic CODECH, FLO ID 2892 (GrainPro) 7128 69kg 275 OPEN origin For picture gallery click here and here Average Farm Size: 0.5ha/farm Huehuetenango has been for years one of Guatemala’s prime coffee regions and it continues to be one.  The amount of high-altitude land in this region is very vast and the varieties cultivated are Bourbons or derivatives; both of these are essential to produce quality coffee.  The profile of this cup is very fruity with higher and brighter citric-acidity.  It is also very common to taste some chocolate notes in the background. This year we are also bringing in microlots from CODECH.  These are from higher altitude farms harvested later in the year and from specific associations under the CODECH umbrella. -Piero CODECH (Coordinator of organizations for the development of Concepcion Huista) is located in the municipality of Concepcion Huista in the department of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.  It is comprised of 10 different organizations. CODECH comes to be in August of 1998, through the representatives of the different organizing bodies in search of alternative development programs for Concepcion Huista.  Out of all the organizations 4 of these focus mainly on coffee (organic and conventional). One of CODECH’s main objectives is the participation of women in society and the workforce.    Projects *Organic farming workshops *General agriculture workshops *National and international commercialization workshops *Teacher development workshops *Women specific workshops *Political incidence *Women rights and gender equity *Self esteem *Leadership *Medical attention *Household development *Classes by mail and radio station Gregorio, the general manager of CODECH, is pushing for farmers to renovate their farms.  He thinks they are underproducing at the moment and believes they could be producing about 3 times their current volume on average. His reasoning behind the organic certification is not only to be environmentally friendly but to be independent from transnationals which produce fertilizers.  They are also want independence from the price of oil (used in fertilizers).  Gregorio also believes that there is a growing market for organic products and wants to meet that demand.
Guatemala FTO Huehuetenango Fair Trade Organic CODECH, FLO ID 2892 (GrainPro) 7122 69kg 275 OPEN origin For picture gallery click here and here Average Farm Size: 0.5ha/farm Huehuetenango has been for years one of Guatemala’s prime coffee regions and it continues to be one.  The amount of high-altitude land in this region is very vast and the varieties cultivated are Bourbons or derivatives; both of these are essential to produce quality coffee.  The profile of this cup is very fruity with higher and brighter citric-acidity.  It is also very common to taste some chocolate notes in the background. This year we are also bringing in microlots from CODECH.  These are from higher altitude farms harvested later in the year and from specific associations under the CODECH umbrella. -Piero CODECH (Coordinator of organizations for the development of Concepcion Huista) is located in the municipality of Concepcion Huista in the department of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.  It is comprised of 10 different organizations. CODECH comes to be in August of 1998, through the representatives of the different organizing bodies in search of alternative development programs for Concepcion Huista.  Out of all the organizations 4 of these focus mainly on coffee (organic and conventional). One of CODECH’s main objectives is the participation of women in society and the workforce.    Projects *Organic farming workshops *General agriculture workshops *National and international commercialization workshops *Teacher development workshops *Women specific workshops *Political incidence *Women rights and gender equity *Self esteem *Leadership *Medical attention *Household development *Classes by mail and radio station Gregorio, the general manager of CODECH, is pushing for farmers to renovate their farms.  He thinks they are underproducing at the moment and believes they could be producing about 3 times their current volume on average. His reasoning behind the organic certification is not only to be environmentally friendly but to be independent from transnationals which produce fertilizers.  They are also want independence from the price of oil (used in fertilizers).  Gregorio also believes that there is a growing market for organic products and wants to meet that demand.
Guatemala FTO Huehuetenango Fair Trade Organic CODECH, FLO ID 2892 (GrainPro) 7123 69kg 267 OPEN origin For picture gallery click here and here Average Farm Size: 0.5ha/farm Huehuetenango has been for years one of Guatemala’s prime coffee regions and it continues to be one.  The amount of high-altitude land in this region is very vast and the varieties cultivated are Bourbons or derivatives; both of these are essential to produce quality coffee.  The profile of this cup is very fruity with higher and brighter citric-acidity.  It is also very common to taste some chocolate notes in the background. This year we are also bringing in microlots from CODECH.  These are from higher altitude farms harvested later in the year and from specific associations under the CODECH umbrella. -Piero CODECH (Coordinator of organizations for the development of Concepcion Huista) is located in the municipality of Concepcion Huista in the department of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.  It is comprised of 10 different organizations. CODECH comes to be in August of 1998, through the representatives of the different organizing bodies in search of alternative development programs for Concepcion Huista.  Out of all the organizations 4 of these focus mainly on coffee (organic and conventional). One of CODECH’s main objectives is the participation of women in society and the workforce.    Projects *Organic farming workshops *General agriculture workshops *National and international commercialization workshops *Teacher development workshops *Women specific workshops *Political incidence *Women rights and gender equity *Self esteem *Leadership *Medical attention *Household development *Classes by mail and radio station Gregorio, the general manager of CODECH, is pushing for farmers to renovate their farms.  He thinks they are underproducing at the moment and believes they could be producing about 3 times their current volume on average. His reasoning behind the organic certification is not only to be environmentally friendly but to be independent from transnationals which produce fertilizers.  They are also want independence from the price of oil (used in fertilizers).  Gregorio also believes that there is a growing market for organic products and wants to meet that demand.
Guatemala FTO Huehuetenango Fair Trade Organic CODECH, FLO ID 2892 (GrainPro) 7124 69kg 275 OPEN origin For picture gallery click here and here Average Farm Size: 0.5ha/farm Huehuetenango has been for years one of Guatemala’s prime coffee regions and it continues to be one.  The amount of high-altitude land in this region is very vast and the varieties cultivated are Bourbons or derivatives; both of these are essential to produce quality coffee.  The profile of this cup is very fruity with higher and brighter citric-acidity.  It is also very common to taste some chocolate notes in the background. This year we are also bringing in microlots from CODECH.  These are from higher altitude farms harvested later in the year and from specific associations under the CODECH umbrella. -Piero CODECH (Coordinator of organizations for the development of Concepcion Huista) is located in the municipality of Concepcion Huista in the department of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.  It is comprised of 10 different organizations. CODECH comes to be in August of 1998, through the representatives of the different organizing bodies in search of alternative development programs for Concepcion Huista.  Out of all the organizations 4 of these focus mainly on coffee (organic and conventional). One of CODECH’s main objectives is the participation of women in society and the workforce.    Projects *Organic farming workshops *General agriculture workshops *National and international commercialization workshops *Teacher development workshops *Women specific workshops *Political incidence *Women rights and gender equity *Self esteem *Leadership *Medical attention *Household development *Classes by mail and radio station Gregorio, the general manager of CODECH, is pushing for farmers to renovate their farms.  He thinks they are underproducing at the moment and believes they could be producing about 3 times their current volume on average. His reasoning behind the organic certification is not only to be environmentally friendly but to be independent from transnationals which produce fertilizers.  They are also want independence from the price of oil (used in fertilizers).  Gregorio also believes that there is a growing market for organic products and wants to meet that demand.
Guatemala FTO Huehuetenango Fair Trade Organic CODECH, FLO ID 2892 (GrainPro) 7125 69kg 275 OPEN origin For picture gallery click here and here Average Farm Size: 0.5ha/farm Huehuetenango has been for years one of Guatemala’s prime coffee regions and it continues to be one.  The amount of high-altitude land in this region is very vast and the varieties cultivated are Bourbons or derivatives; both of these are essential to produce quality coffee.  The profile of this cup is very fruity with higher and brighter citric-acidity.  It is also very common to taste some chocolate notes in the background. This year we are also bringing in microlots from CODECH.  These are from higher altitude farms harvested later in the year and from specific associations under the CODECH umbrella. -Piero CODECH (Coordinator of organizations for the development of Concepcion Huista) is located in the municipality of Concepcion Huista in the department of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.  It is comprised of 10 different organizations. CODECH comes to be in August of 1998, through the representatives of the different organizing bodies in search of alternative development programs for Concepcion Huista.  Out of all the organizations 4 of these focus mainly on coffee (organic and conventional). One of CODECH’s main objectives is the participation of women in society and the workforce.    Projects *Organic farming workshops *General agriculture workshops *National and international commercialization workshops *Teacher development workshops *Women specific workshops *Political incidence *Women rights and gender equity *Self esteem *Leadership *Medical attention *Household development *Classes by mail and radio station Gregorio, the general manager of CODECH, is pushing for farmers to renovate their farms.  He thinks they are underproducing at the moment and believes they could be producing about 3 times their current volume on average. His reasoning behind the organic certification is not only to be environmentally friendly but to be independent from transnationals which produce fertilizers.  They are also want independence from the price of oil (used in fertilizers).  Gregorio also believes that there is a growing market for organic products and wants to meet that demand.
Guatemala FTO Huehuetenango Fair Trade Organic ASDECAFE, FLO ID 30330 (GrainPro) 7198 69kg 275 OPEN origin Toffee and lemon with a soft nutty aftertaste. Toffee and lemon with a soft nutty aftertaste. The Guatemalan Republic located in the Central American region is one of the countries with a long tradition in producing high quality coffee. Its microclimates, lush nature and topography allow it to produce exquisite coffees that are among the best in the world. The Sustainable Coffee Association of Guatemala ASDECAFE, is organized with the objective of making washed Arabica coffees of excellent quality from the Huehuetenango and El Quiche regions available to the international market. Among its partners are groups of producers who are members of Associations and Cooperatives, keeping in mind the future of including private plantations and family groups. The concept of “sustainability” is based on a strong commitment to the protection of the environment, equal distribution of the generated profits, business transparency, a strong commitment to quality and long-term relationships with clients and suppliers. ASDECAFE contributes to the local and national economy by generating employment, foreign exchange earnings and fiscal responsibility. ASDECAFE currently has FAIR TRADE, Organic and Nespresso certification. Its total production is 30,000 bags of exported coffee which are distributed among the local and international markets. The following are ASDECAFE member organizations: COOPERATIVA AGRICOLA INTEGRAL A´XOLA R.L. The Axolá Cooperative, as it’s commonly called, is located in the Petatán village, in the town of Concepción Huista, Huehuetenango.  The partners are 105 producers with the majority of them being from the maya poptí ethnicity, the area in which they grow the coffee is 205 hectares. Its estimated annual coffee production is 5,000 quintales of parchment, with each one weighing 100 pounds. Of all of the coffee grown, some is organic (approximately 1,100 quintales) y the rest is conventional. The production altitude ranges from 1300 to 1800 msnm. Currently the Axolá Cooperative is part of the ASDECAFE and is FAIR TRADE and ORGANIC certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to develop microlots, mainly in the Qanalaj zone. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon and Arabic.    ASOCIACION DE DESARROLLO MICROREGIONAL  LOS ALTOS DEL ARROLLO SECO –ADIRSEC-. Commonly known as ADIRSEC, it’s an organization located en the Coyegual village, in the town of San Antonio Huista, Huehuetenango. The organization is made up of 28 partners, who are mainly ladino, with an expanse of 48 hectares of washed Arabic coffee. Its average annual production is about 2200 quintales of parchment. Being located in an excellent microclimate, with altitudes between 1500 and 1700 msnm, with producers of second and third generation coffee growers, makes this area a production area of microlots and specialty coffee. Currently it’s part of ASDECAFE and FAIR TRADE certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to identify microlots due to the excellent quality of their coffee. Its predominant varieties are Bourbon and Catuai.   ASOCIACION DESARRAIGADA MAYA INDIGENA -ADEMAYA- Commonly known as ADEMAYA, this organization is located in the town of Chajul, El Quiche, Guatemala. It is made up of 61 producers, mostly of the maya lxil population. The production area is 40 hectares for coffee production and its annual production is 1,100 quintales of parchment. Its production is 100% organic. Its currently part of ASDECAFE and ORGANIC and FAIR TRADE certified. The growing altitude ranges from 1200 to 1500 msnm. The predominant varieties are Bourbon, Catuai and Catimor. For the 2014/2015 harvest they are considering increasing the number of partners and the volume of organic production.   ASOCIACION DE DESARROLLO INTEGRAL LA ESPERANZA TONECA -ADIESTO- ADIESTO is located in the town of San Antonio Huista, Huehuetenango even though their range includes partners from other towns such as Union Cantinil and Concepción Huista. ADIESTO has 360 partners from diverse ethnic groups, predominantly ladino. Its producing area is 248 hectares with an estimated annual production of 11,200 quintales of parchment coffee. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon, Catimor and a dispersed production of Maragogype and Pacamara. The production altitudes of ADIESTO range from 1000 to 1600 masl. ADIESTO is currently a member of ASDECAFE and has 3 certifications: one of them is TRIPLE A since ADIESTO is one the main suppliers of NESPRESSO coffee, in addition it is certified FAIR TRADE and ORGANIC. The organic production is 2100 which represents 18% of the total production. For the 2014/2015 harvest they are considering increasing the number of producing partners and the volume of organic coffee.   ASOCIACIÓN DE DESARROLLO INTEGRAL “EL ESFUERZO” TUIBOCH TODOS SANTOS -ASODIETT ONG-. ASODIETT is located in the Tuiboch village, in the town of Todos Santos Cuchumatán, Huehuetenango. It is made up of 34 partners of the maya-mam ethnicity. Its producting area is 42 hectares and its estimated production of parchment coffee is 1900 quintales. The predominant varieties are Catuai and Bourbon. Tuiboch has an average altitude of 1500 masl and has one of the best microclimates for growing coffee, as it’s at the basin of the Rio Ocho. Its currently a member of ASDECAFE and is FAIR TRADE certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to increase the number of partners.   ASOCIACION PARA EL DESARROLLO INTEGRAL DE SAN PEDRO NECTA –ASODESI- ASODESI is an organization located in the town of San Pedro Necta, Huehuetenango. ASODESI provides a variety of services to the community such as health services and education. It has 117 coffee-growing partners and the majority are maya-mam. It has a production area of 145 hectares with an annual production of 6200 quintales of parchment coffee. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon, Pache and Catimor. San Pedro Necta es one of the zones producing the best quality of coffee in Huehuetenango, its microclimates and altitudes ranging from 1400 to 1800 masl provide coffee with an excellent cup. Its currently a member of ASDECAFE and some of its coffee is exported as Slow Food.
Guatemala FTO Huehuetenango Fair Trade Organic ASDECAFE, FLO ID 30330 (GrainPro) 7199 69kg 275 OPEN origin Chocolate and citric acidity with a nutty aftertaste. Chocolate and citric acidity with a nutty aftertaste. The Guatemalan Republic located in the Central American region is one of the countries with a long tradition in producing high quality coffee. Its microclimates, lush nature and topography allow it to produce exquisite coffees that are among the best in the world. The Sustainable Coffee Association of Guatemala ASDECAFE, is organized with the objective of making washed Arabica coffees of excellent quality from the Huehuetenango and El Quiche regions available to the international market. Among its partners are groups of producers who are members of Associations and Cooperatives, keeping in mind the future of including private plantations and family groups. The concept of “sustainability” is based on a strong commitment to the protection of the environment, equal distribution of the generated profits, business transparency, a strong commitment to quality and long-term relationships with clients and suppliers. ASDECAFE contributes to the local and national economy by generating employment, foreign exchange earnings and fiscal responsibility. ASDECAFE currently has FAIR TRADE, Organic and Nespresso certification. Its total production is 30,000 bags of exported coffee which are distributed among the local and international markets. The following are ASDECAFE member organizations: COOPERATIVA AGRICOLA INTEGRAL A´XOLA R.L. The Axolá Cooperative, as it’s commonly called, is located in the Petatán village, in the town of Concepción Huista, Huehuetenango.  The partners are 105 producers with the majority of them being from the maya poptí ethnicity, the area in which they grow the coffee is 205 hectares. Its estimated annual coffee production is 5,000 quintales of parchment, with each one weighing 100 pounds. Of all of the coffee grown, some is organic (approximately 1,100 quintales) y the rest is conventional. The production altitude ranges from 1300 to 1800 msnm. Currently the Axolá Cooperative is part of the ASDECAFE and is FAIR TRADE and ORGANIC certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to develop microlots, mainly in the Qanalaj zone. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon and Arabic.    ASOCIACION DE DESARROLLO MICROREGIONAL  LOS ALTOS DEL ARROLLO SECO –ADIRSEC-. Commonly known as ADIRSEC, it’s an organization located en the Coyegual village, in the town of San Antonio Huista, Huehuetenango. The organization is made up of 28 partners, who are mainly ladino, with an expanse of 48 hectares of washed Arabic coffee. Its average annual production is about 2200 quintales of parchment. Being located in an excellent microclimate, with altitudes between 1500 and 1700 msnm, with producers of second and third generation coffee growers, makes this area a production area of microlots and specialty coffee. Currently it’s part of ASDECAFE and FAIR TRADE certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to identify microlots due to the excellent quality of their coffee. Its predominant varieties are Bourbon and Catuai.   ASOCIACION DESARRAIGADA MAYA INDIGENA -ADEMAYA- Commonly known as ADEMAYA, this organization is located in the town of Chajul, El Quiche, Guatemala. It is made up of 61 producers, mostly of the maya lxil population. The production area is 40 hectares for coffee production and its annual production is 1,100 quintales of parchment. Its production is 100% organic. Its currently part of ASDECAFE and ORGANIC and FAIR TRADE certified. The growing altitude ranges from 1200 to 1500 msnm. The predominant varieties are Bourbon, Catuai and Catimor. For the 2014/2015 harvest they are considering increasing the number of partners and the volume of organic production.   ASOCIACION DE DESARROLLO INTEGRAL LA ESPERANZA TONECA -ADIESTO- ADIESTO is located in the town of San Antonio Huista, Huehuetenango even though their range includes partners from other towns such as Union Cantinil and Concepción Huista. ADIESTO has 360 partners from diverse ethnic groups, predominantly ladino. Its producing area is 248 hectares with an estimated annual production of 11,200 quintales of parchment coffee. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon, Catimor and a dispersed production of Maragogype and Pacamara. The production altitudes of ADIESTO range from 1000 to 1600 masl. ADIESTO is currently a member of ASDECAFE and has 3 certifications: one of them is TRIPLE A since ADIESTO is one the main suppliers of NESPRESSO coffee, in addition it is certified FAIR TRADE and ORGANIC. The organic production is 2100 which represents 18% of the total production. For the 2014/2015 harvest they are considering increasing the number of producing partners and the volume of organic coffee.   ASOCIACIÓN DE DESARROLLO INTEGRAL “EL ESFUERZO” TUIBOCH TODOS SANTOS -ASODIETT ONG-. ASODIETT is located in the Tuiboch village, in the town of Todos Santos Cuchumatán, Huehuetenango. It is made up of 34 partners of the maya-mam ethnicity. Its producting area is 42 hectares and its estimated production of parchment coffee is 1900 quintales. The predominant varieties are Catuai and Bourbon. Tuiboch has an average altitude of 1500 masl and has one of the best microclimates for growing coffee, as it’s at the basin of the Rio Ocho. Its currently a member of ASDECAFE and is FAIR TRADE certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to increase the number of partners.   ASOCIACION PARA EL DESARROLLO INTEGRAL DE SAN PEDRO NECTA –ASODESI- ASODESI is an organization located in the town of San Pedro Necta, Huehuetenango. ASODESI provides a variety of services to the community such as health services and education. It has 117 coffee-growing partners and the majority are maya-mam. It has a production area of 145 hectares with an annual production of 6200 quintales of parchment coffee. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon, Pache and Catimor. San Pedro Necta es one of the zones producing the best quality of coffee in Huehuetenango, its microclimates and altitudes ranging from 1400 to 1800 masl provide coffee with an excellent cup. Its currently a member of ASDECAFE and some of its coffee is exported as Slow Food.
Guatemala FTO Huehuetenango Fair Trade Organic ASDECAFE, FLO ID 30330 (GrainPro) 7200 69kg 264 OPEN origin The Guatemalan Republic located in the Central American region is one of the countries with a long tradition in producing high quality coffee. Its microclimates, lush nature and topography allow it to produce exquisite coffees that are among the best in the world. The Sustainable Coffee Association of Guatemala ASDECAFE, is organized with the objective of making washed Arabica coffees of excellent quality from the Huehuetenango and El Quiche regions available to the international market. Among its partners are groups of producers who are members of Associations and Cooperatives, keeping in mind the future of including private plantations and family groups. The concept of “sustainability” is based on a strong commitment to the protection of the environment, equal distribution of the generated profits, business transparency, a strong commitment to quality and long-term relationships with clients and suppliers. ASDECAFE contributes to the local and national economy by generating employment, foreign exchange earnings and fiscal responsibility. ASDECAFE currently has FAIR TRADE, Organic and Nespresso certification. Its total production is 30,000 bags of exported coffee which are distributed among the local and international markets. The following are ASDECAFE member organizations: COOPERATIVA AGRICOLA INTEGRAL A´XOLA R.L. The Axolá Cooperative, as it’s commonly called, is located in the Petatán village, in the town of Concepción Huista, Huehuetenango.  The partners are 105 producers with the majority of them being from the maya poptí ethnicity, the area in which they grow the coffee is 205 hectares. Its estimated annual coffee production is 5,000 quintales of parchment, with each one weighing 100 pounds. Of all of the coffee grown, some is organic (approximately 1,100 quintales) y the rest is conventional. The production altitude ranges from 1300 to 1800 msnm. Currently the Axolá Cooperative is part of the ASDECAFE and is FAIR TRADE and ORGANIC certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to develop microlots, mainly in the Qanalaj zone. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon and Arabic.    ASOCIACION DE DESARROLLO MICROREGIONAL  LOS ALTOS DEL ARROLLO SECO –ADIRSEC-. Commonly known as ADIRSEC, it’s an organization located en the Coyegual village, in the town of San Antonio Huista, Huehuetenango. The organization is made up of 28 partners, who are mainly ladino, with an expanse of 48 hectares of washed Arabic coffee. Its average annual production is about 2200 quintales of parchment. Being located in an excellent microclimate, with altitudes between 1500 and 1700 msnm, with producers of second and third generation coffee growers, makes this area a production area of microlots and specialty coffee. Currently it’s part of ASDECAFE and FAIR TRADE certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to identify microlots due to the excellent quality of their coffee. Its predominant varieties are Bourbon and Catuai.   ASOCIACION DESARRAIGADA MAYA INDIGENA -ADEMAYA- Commonly known as ADEMAYA, this organization is located in the town of Chajul, El Quiche, Guatemala. It is made up of 61 producers, mostly of the maya lxil population. The production area is 40 hectares for coffee production and its annual production is 1,100 quintales of parchment. Its production is 100% organic. Its currently part of ASDECAFE and ORGANIC and FAIR TRADE certified. The growing altitude ranges from 1200 to 1500 msnm. The predominant varieties are Bourbon, Catuai and Catimor. For the 2014/2015 harvest they are considering increasing the number of partners and the volume of organic production.   ASOCIACION DE DESARROLLO INTEGRAL LA ESPERANZA TONECA -ADIESTO- ADIESTO is located in the town of San Antonio Huista, Huehuetenango even though their range includes partners from other towns such as Union Cantinil and Concepción Huista. ADIESTO has 360 partners from diverse ethnic groups, predominantly ladino. Its producing area is 248 hectares with an estimated annual production of 11,200 quintales of parchment coffee. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon, Catimor and a dispersed production of Maragogype and Pacamara. The production altitudes of ADIESTO range from 1000 to 1600 masl. ADIESTO is currently a member of ASDECAFE and has 3 certifications: one of them is TRIPLE A since ADIESTO is one the main suppliers of NESPRESSO coffee, in addition it is certified FAIR TRADE and ORGANIC. The organic production is 2100 which represents 18% of the total production. For the 2014/2015 harvest they are considering increasing the number of producing partners and the volume of organic coffee.   ASOCIACIÓN DE DESARROLLO INTEGRAL “EL ESFUERZO” TUIBOCH TODOS SANTOS -ASODIETT ONG-. ASODIETT is located in the Tuiboch village, in the town of Todos Santos Cuchumatán, Huehuetenango. It is made up of 34 partners of the maya-mam ethnicity. Its producting area is 42 hectares and its estimated production of parchment coffee is 1900 quintales. The predominant varieties are Catuai and Bourbon. Tuiboch has an average altitude of 1500 masl and has one of the best microclimates for growing coffee, as it’s at the basin of the Rio Ocho. Its currently a member of ASDECAFE and is FAIR TRADE certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to increase the number of partners.   ASOCIACION PARA EL DESARROLLO INTEGRAL DE SAN PEDRO NECTA –ASODESI- ASODESI is an organization located in the town of San Pedro Necta, Huehuetenango. ASODESI provides a variety of services to the community such as health services and education. It has 117 coffee-growing partners and the majority are maya-mam. It has a production area of 145 hectares with an annual production of 6200 quintales of parchment coffee. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon, Pache and Catimor. San Pedro Necta es one of the zones producing the best quality of coffee in Huehuetenango, its microclimates and altitudes ranging from 1400 to 1800 masl provide coffee with an excellent cup. Its currently a member of ASDECAFE and some of its coffee is exported as Slow Food.
Guatemala FTO Huehuetenango Fair Trade Organic ASDECAFE, FLO ID 30330 (GrainPro) 7201 69kg 275 OPEN origin The Guatemalan Republic located in the Central American region is one of the countries with a long tradition in producing high quality coffee. Its microclimates, lush nature and topography allow it to produce exquisite coffees that are among the best in the world. The Sustainable Coffee Association of Guatemala ASDECAFE, is organized with the objective of making washed Arabica coffees of excellent quality from the Huehuetenango and El Quiche regions available to the international market. Among its partners are groups of producers who are members of Associations and Cooperatives, keeping in mind the future of including private plantations and family groups. The concept of “sustainability” is based on a strong commitment to the protection of the environment, equal distribution of the generated profits, business transparency, a strong commitment to quality and long-term relationships with clients and suppliers. ASDECAFE contributes to the local and national economy by generating employment, foreign exchange earnings and fiscal responsibility. ASDECAFE currently has FAIR TRADE, Organic and Nespresso certification. Its total production is 30,000 bags of exported coffee which are distributed among the local and international markets. The following are ASDECAFE member organizations: COOPERATIVA AGRICOLA INTEGRAL A´XOLA R.L. The Axolá Cooperative, as it’s commonly called, is located in the Petatán village, in the town of Concepción Huista, Huehuetenango.  The partners are 105 producers with the majority of them being from the maya poptí ethnicity, the area in which they grow the coffee is 205 hectares. Its estimated annual coffee production is 5,000 quintales of parchment, with each one weighing 100 pounds. Of all of the coffee grown, some is organic (approximately 1,100 quintales) y the rest is conventional. The production altitude ranges from 1300 to 1800 msnm. Currently the Axolá Cooperative is part of the ASDECAFE and is FAIR TRADE and ORGANIC certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to develop microlots, mainly in the Qanalaj zone. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon and Arabic.    ASOCIACION DE DESARROLLO MICROREGIONAL  LOS ALTOS DEL ARROLLO SECO –ADIRSEC-. Commonly known as ADIRSEC, it’s an organization located en the Coyegual village, in the town of San Antonio Huista, Huehuetenango. The organization is made up of 28 partners, who are mainly ladino, with an expanse of 48 hectares of washed Arabic coffee. Its average annual production is about 2200 quintales of parchment. Being located in an excellent microclimate, with altitudes between 1500 and 1700 msnm, with producers of second and third generation coffee growers, makes this area a production area of microlots and specialty coffee. Currently it’s part of ASDECAFE and FAIR TRADE certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to identify microlots due to the excellent quality of their coffee. Its predominant varieties are Bourbon and Catuai.   ASOCIACION DESARRAIGADA MAYA INDIGENA -ADEMAYA- Commonly known as ADEMAYA, this organization is located in the town of Chajul, El Quiche, Guatemala. It is made up of 61 producers, mostly of the maya lxil population. The production area is 40 hectares for coffee production and its annual production is 1,100 quintales of parchment. Its production is 100% organic. Its currently part of ASDECAFE and ORGANIC and FAIR TRADE certified. The growing altitude ranges from 1200 to 1500 msnm. The predominant varieties are Bourbon, Catuai and Catimor. For the 2014/2015 harvest they are considering increasing the number of partners and the volume of organic production.   ASOCIACION DE DESARROLLO INTEGRAL LA ESPERANZA TONECA -ADIESTO- ADIESTO is located in the town of San Antonio Huista, Huehuetenango even though their range includes partners from other towns such as Union Cantinil and Concepción Huista. ADIESTO has 360 partners from diverse ethnic groups, predominantly ladino. Its producing area is 248 hectares with an estimated annual production of 11,200 quintales of parchment coffee. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon, Catimor and a dispersed production of Maragogype and Pacamara. The production altitudes of ADIESTO range from 1000 to 1600 masl. ADIESTO is currently a member of ASDECAFE and has 3 certifications: one of them is TRIPLE A since ADIESTO is one the main suppliers of NESPRESSO coffee, in addition it is certified FAIR TRADE and ORGANIC. The organic production is 2100 which represents 18% of the total production. For the 2014/2015 harvest they are considering increasing the number of producing partners and the volume of organic coffee.   ASOCIACIÓN DE DESARROLLO INTEGRAL “EL ESFUERZO” TUIBOCH TODOS SANTOS -ASODIETT ONG-. ASODIETT is located in the Tuiboch village, in the town of Todos Santos Cuchumatán, Huehuetenango. It is made up of 34 partners of the maya-mam ethnicity. Its producting area is 42 hectares and its estimated production of parchment coffee is 1900 quintales. The predominant varieties are Catuai and Bourbon. Tuiboch has an average altitude of 1500 masl and has one of the best microclimates for growing coffee, as it’s at the basin of the Rio Ocho. Its currently a member of ASDECAFE and is FAIR TRADE certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to increase the number of partners.   ASOCIACION PARA EL DESARROLLO INTEGRAL DE SAN PEDRO NECTA –ASODESI- ASODESI is an organization located in the town of San Pedro Necta, Huehuetenango. ASODESI provides a variety of services to the community such as health services and education. It has 117 coffee-growing partners and the majority are maya-mam. It has a production area of 145 hectares with an annual production of 6200 quintales of parchment coffee. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon, Pache and Catimor. San Pedro Necta es one of the zones producing the best quality of coffee in Huehuetenango, its microclimates and altitudes ranging from 1400 to 1800 masl provide coffee with an excellent cup. Its currently a member of ASDECAFE and some of its coffee is exported as Slow Food.
Guatemala FTO Huehuetenango Fair Trade Organic ASDECAFE, FLO ID 30330 (GrainPro) 7202 69kg 275 OPEN origin The Guatemalan Republic located in the Central American region is one of the countries with a long tradition in producing high quality coffee. Its microclimates, lush nature and topography allow it to produce exquisite coffees that are among the best in the world. The Sustainable Coffee Association of Guatemala ASDECAFE, is organized with the objective of making washed Arabica coffees of excellent quality from the Huehuetenango and El Quiche regions available to the international market. Among its partners are groups of producers who are members of Associations and Cooperatives, keeping in mind the future of including private plantations and family groups. The concept of “sustainability” is based on a strong commitment to the protection of the environment, equal distribution of the generated profits, business transparency, a strong commitment to quality and long-term relationships with clients and suppliers. ASDECAFE contributes to the local and national economy by generating employment, foreign exchange earnings and fiscal responsibility. ASDECAFE currently has FAIR TRADE, Organic and Nespresso certification. Its total production is 30,000 bags of exported coffee which are distributed among the local and international markets. The following are ASDECAFE member organizations: COOPERATIVA AGRICOLA INTEGRAL A´XOLA R.L. The Axolá Cooperative, as it’s commonly called, is located in the Petatán village, in the town of Concepción Huista, Huehuetenango.  The partners are 105 producers with the majority of them being from the maya poptí ethnicity, the area in which they grow the coffee is 205 hectares. Its estimated annual coffee production is 5,000 quintales of parchment, with each one weighing 100 pounds. Of all of the coffee grown, some is organic (approximately 1,100 quintales) y the rest is conventional. The production altitude ranges from 1300 to 1800 msnm. Currently the Axolá Cooperative is part of the ASDECAFE and is FAIR TRADE and ORGANIC certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to develop microlots, mainly in the Qanalaj zone. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon and Arabic.    ASOCIACION DE DESARROLLO MICROREGIONAL  LOS ALTOS DEL ARROLLO SECO –ADIRSEC-. Commonly known as ADIRSEC, it’s an organization located en the Coyegual village, in the town of San Antonio Huista, Huehuetenango. The organization is made up of 28 partners, who are mainly ladino, with an expanse of 48 hectares of washed Arabic coffee. Its average annual production is about 2200 quintales of parchment. Being located in an excellent microclimate, with altitudes between 1500 and 1700 msnm, with producers of second and third generation coffee growers, makes this area a production area of microlots and specialty coffee. Currently it’s part of ASDECAFE and FAIR TRADE certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to identify microlots due to the excellent quality of their coffee. Its predominant varieties are Bourbon and Catuai.   ASOCIACION DESARRAIGADA MAYA INDIGENA -ADEMAYA- Commonly known as ADEMAYA, this organization is located in the town of Chajul, El Quiche, Guatemala. It is made up of 61 producers, mostly of the maya lxil population. The production area is 40 hectares for coffee production and its annual production is 1,100 quintales of parchment. Its production is 100% organic. Its currently part of ASDECAFE and ORGANIC and FAIR TRADE certified. The growing altitude ranges from 1200 to 1500 msnm. The predominant varieties are Bourbon, Catuai and Catimor. For the 2014/2015 harvest they are considering increasing the number of partners and the volume of organic production.   ASOCIACION DE DESARROLLO INTEGRAL LA ESPERANZA TONECA -ADIESTO- ADIESTO is located in the town of San Antonio Huista, Huehuetenango even though their range includes partners from other towns such as Union Cantinil and Concepción Huista. ADIESTO has 360 partners from diverse ethnic groups, predominantly ladino. Its producing area is 248 hectares with an estimated annual production of 11,200 quintales of parchment coffee. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon, Catimor and a dispersed production of Maragogype and Pacamara. The production altitudes of ADIESTO range from 1000 to 1600 masl. ADIESTO is currently a member of ASDECAFE and has 3 certifications: one of them is TRIPLE A since ADIESTO is one the main suppliers of NESPRESSO coffee, in addition it is certified FAIR TRADE and ORGANIC. The organic production is 2100 which represents 18% of the total production. For the 2014/2015 harvest they are considering increasing the number of producing partners and the volume of organic coffee.   ASOCIACIÓN DE DESARROLLO INTEGRAL “EL ESFUERZO” TUIBOCH TODOS SANTOS -ASODIETT ONG-. ASODIETT is located in the Tuiboch village, in the town of Todos Santos Cuchumatán, Huehuetenango. It is made up of 34 partners of the maya-mam ethnicity. Its producting area is 42 hectares and its estimated production of parchment coffee is 1900 quintales. The predominant varieties are Catuai and Bourbon. Tuiboch has an average altitude of 1500 masl and has one of the best microclimates for growing coffee, as it’s at the basin of the Rio Ocho. Its currently a member of ASDECAFE and is FAIR TRADE certified. For the 2014/2015 harvest they plan to increase the number of partners.   ASOCIACION PARA EL DESARROLLO INTEGRAL DE SAN PEDRO NECTA –ASODESI- ASODESI is an organization located in the town of San Pedro Necta, Huehuetenango. ASODESI provides a variety of services to the community such as health services and education. It has 117 coffee-growing partners and the majority are maya-mam. It has a production area of 145 hectares with an annual production of 6200 quintales of parchment coffee. The predominant varieties are Catuai, Bourbon, Pache and Catimor. San Pedro Necta es one of the zones producing the best quality of coffee in Huehuetenango, its microclimates and altitudes ranging from 1400 to 1800 masl provide coffee with an excellent cup. Its currently a member of ASDECAFE and some of its coffee is exported as Slow Food.
Guatemala Huehuetenango 1 Waykan (GrainPro) 7220 69kg 224 AFLOAT afloat juicy with cacao, and herb.
Guatemala Huehuetenango 1 Waykan (GrainPro) 7395 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
Guatemala Microlot 5 Huehuetenango - Waykan (GrainPro) 7224 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
Guatemala Microlot 5 Huehuetenango - Waykan (GrainPro) 7225 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
Guatemala Regional Select Huehuetenango - Waykan (GrainPro) 7221 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
Guatemala Regional Select Huehuetenango - Waykan (GrainPro) 7222 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
Guatemala Regional Select Quiche - Waykan (GrainPro) 7223 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
Guatemala Regional Select Huehuetenango - Waykan (GrainPro) 7396 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
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SHB EP Huehuetenango - Coop Rio Azul (GrainPro) 5854 69kg 21 CALM Melbourne melbourne-au Sweet with plum, cherry, floral and caramel flavors. Sweet with plum, cherry, floral and caramel flavors. This is a Coop specific Guatemalan that have been so pleased with over the years (this coffee is different than the more generic "Huehue Rio Azul"). This lot is from an amazing coop of the same name in the Huehuetenango region. This cup was extremely fruity, with raspberry, blueberry, and other deep red fruits as the prominate notes, supported by a pleasant spice of sage. This coffee has a very delicate mouthfeel, and would be an excellent coffee to feature as a single origin on your drip bar. Definitely worth checking out while it lasts! Production is aprox 1,750 bags total  of which 375 bags of Organic Coffee Organic since 2006, Cooperativa  Rio Azul was founded December 12th, 1967.  In 1999 it collapsed  Due to economic and personal problems, but started again in 2004 and Ramon Delgado the current marketing manager of Unitrade, started with the Coop in 2005. Unitrade has been buying their coffee since 2004
Guatemala SHB EP Acatenango Acatenango Quisache (GrainPro) 6954 69kg 250 OPEN   origin
Guatemala SHB EP Antigua Sereno (GrainPro) 7333 69kg 275 AFLOAT afloat Soft and citric with toffee and chocolate.
Guatemala SHB EP Antigua Sereno (GrainPro) 7334 69kg 275 AFLOAT afloat Peanut brittle, chocolate and lime.
Guatemala SHB EP Atitlan San Pedro La Laguna (GrainPro) 7034 69kg 168 OPEN origin Balanced, toffee and chocolate with citric acidity. Balanced, toffee and chocolate with citric acidity. For general Atitlan pictures click here Throughout the harvest many lots from San Pedro, Atitlan were cupped and classified according to their cup quality and profile. The best lots were selected to form this microlot which is the best expression of what this region can offer. Average Rainfall: 2000mm Average Temperature: 68 - 73 F Humidity: 75 - 85% Soil: Volcanic Atitlan’s soil is the richest in organic matter. Volcanoes surround Lake Atitlan andthe 90% of the coffee is cultivated along the slopes of them. Daily winds stir the cold lake watersare an influence for the microclimates in the region.
Guatemala SHB EP Atitlan San Pedro La Laguna (GrainPro) 7036 69kg 275 OPEN origin For general Atitlan pictures click here Throughout the harvest many lots from San Pedro, Atitlan were cupped and classified according to their cup quality and profile. The best lots were selected to form this microlot which is the best expression of what this region can offer. Average Rainfall: 2000mm Average Temperature: 68 - 73 F Humidity: 75 - 85% Soil: Volcanic Atitlan’s soil is the richest in organic matter. Volcanoes surround Lake Atitlan andthe 90% of the coffee is cultivated along the slopes of them. Daily winds stir the cold lake watersare an influence for the microclimates in the region.
Guatemala SHB EP Atitlan San Pedro La Laguna (GrainPro) 7037 69kg 275 OPEN origin For general Atitlan pictures click here Throughout the harvest many lots from San Pedro, Atitlan were cupped and classified according to their cup quality and profile. The best lots were selected to form this microlot which is the best expression of what this region can offer. Average Rainfall: 2000mm Average Temperature: 68 - 73 F Humidity: 75 - 85% Soil: Volcanic Atitlan’s soil is the richest in organic matter. Volcanoes surround Lake Atitlan andthe 90% of the coffee is cultivated along the slopes of them. Daily winds stir the cold lake watersare an influence for the microclimates in the region.
Guatemala SHB EP Atitlan San Pedro La Laguna (GrainPro) 7038 69kg 275 OPEN origin For general Atitlan pictures click here Throughout the harvest many lots from San Pedro, Atitlan were cupped and classified according to their cup quality and profile. The best lots were selected to form this microlot which is the best expression of what this region can offer. Average Rainfall: 2000mm Average Temperature: 68 - 73 F Humidity: 75 - 85% Soil: Volcanic Atitlan’s soil is the richest in organic matter. Volcanoes surround Lake Atitlan andthe 90% of the coffee is cultivated along the slopes of them. Daily winds stir the cold lake watersare an influence for the microclimates in the region.
Guatemala SHB EP Atitlan San Pedro La Laguna (GrainPro) 7039 69kg 275 OPEN origin For general Atitlan pictures click here Throughout the harvest many lots from San Pedro, Atitlan were cupped and classified according to their cup quality and profile. The best lots were selected to form this microlot which is the best expression of what this region can offer. Average Rainfall: 2000mm Average Temperature: 68 - 73 F Humidity: 75 - 85% Soil: Volcanic Atitlan’s soil is the richest in organic matter. Volcanoes surround Lake Atitlan andthe 90% of the coffee is cultivated along the slopes of them. Daily winds stir the cold lake watersare an influence for the microclimates in the region.
Guatemala SHB EP Atitlan San Pedro La Laguna (GrainPro) 7402 69kg 275 OPEN origin Throughout the harvest many lots from San Pedro, Atitlan were cupped and classified according to their cup quality and profile. The best lots were selected to form this microlot which is the best expression of what this region can offer. Average Rainfall: 2000mm Average Temperature: 68 - 73 F Humidity: 75 - 85% Soil: Volcanic Atitlan’s soil is rich with organic matter; 90% of coffee in Atitlan is cultivated along volcanic slopes that surround Lake Atitlan. Dailywinds stir the cold lake waters influencing variations for the micro-climates of the region..
Guatemala SHB EP Atitlan San Pedro La Laguna (GrainPro) 7403 69kg 275 OPEN origin Throughout the harvest many lots from San Pedro, Atitlan were cupped and classified according to their cup quality and profile. The best lots were selected to form this microlot which is the best expression of what this region can offer. Average Rainfall: 2000mm Average Temperature: 68 - 73 F Humidity: 75 - 85% Soil: Volcanic Atitlan’s soil is rich with organic matter; 90% of coffee in Atitlan is cultivated along volcanic slopes that surround Lake Atitlan. Dailywinds stir the cold lake waters influencing variations for the micro-climates of the region..
Guatemala SHB EP Huehuetenango Huehuetenango Highland Coffee Presidium Slow Food (GrainPro) 7343 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
Guatemala SHB EP Huehuetenango Huehuetenango Highland Coffee Presidium Slow Food (GrainPro) 7344 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
Guatemala
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Spl Cat 400 Sierra Madre (GrainPro) 6126 69kg 1 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Saturated floral aromatics, tropical tomato and sweet coffee cherry flavors; sugary, perfumed and creamy. Saturated floral aromatics, tropical tomato and sweet coffee cherry flavors; sugary, perfumed and creamy. Theregions contributing to Sierra Madrehavea historic reputation for exceptional coffee production - this is in large partdue to the dry, hotwinds that come from Mexico’s mountains, keeping the soil ofHuehuetenango protected against frost. Smallholders from La Libertad, La Democracia, and Huehuetenango produce the coffee processed at Sierra Madre. The Managers at Sierra Madre aim to keep operations of the Mill focused toward quality, for instance, their fermentation process lasts 24 to 36 hours. The harvest season starts in December and ends in March.
Hawaii
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Washed Arabica Washed Red Catuai - Maui 6647 100kg 4 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Vegetal and nutty.
Honduras FTO SHG EP Fair Trade Organic Coop RAOS Ltda, FLO ID 905 (GrainPro) 7229 69kg 275 AFLOAT afloat Citric with nut and graham.
India
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Arabica Plantation Mysore Plantation A 7182 60kg 10 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Nutty, with citric acidity.
India
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Monsooned Malabar AA 6245 50kg 258 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Popcorn and grassy with a foamy mouthfeel.
India Robusta Parchment Washed AB 7440 60kg 40 IN TRANSIT TO MSP   afloat
Java
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Estate Wonosobow Farmers Coffee - Arabica 6003 60kg 121 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric with nut shell. Citric with nut shell. Java is a new old origin for us.  New, as we are taking a new look at this old origin. The Dutch planted coffee in the late seventeenth century in Indonesia, starting on the island of Java. This was one of the first areas of coffee being grown as a cash crop.  Although the coffee was once prized on the international coffee market and still quite famous as a coffee origin, the cup has left us wanting.  It is a fully washed coffee, but we've found it to be mostly woody and relatively bland so have focused elsewhere till now.  The life and citrus of this coffee gave us hope and we plan to visit and see if we can souce solely typica and of course, riper cherries in the summer of 2014.  - Jason
Kenya
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AA Kichwa Tembo (GrainPro) 6489 60kg 229 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Sweet and tangy with chocolate, grapefruit and lemon.
Kenya
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AA Kichwa Tembo (GrainPro) 6489 60kg 85 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Sweet and tangy with chocolate, grapefruit and lemon.
Kenya Microlot AA Oreti Estate (GrainPro) 7455 60kg 12 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot AA Chania (GrainPro) 7459 60kg 27 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot 1 AB Oreti Estate (GrainPro) 7449 60kg 29 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot 1 AB Chania (GrainPro) 7450 60kg 78 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot 1 AB Weithaga (GrainPro) 7451 60kg 27 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot 1 AB Gondo (GrainPro) 7461 60kg 26 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot 2 AA Weithaga (GrainPro) 7452 60kg 39 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot 2 AA Ruaka (GrainPro) 7453 60kg 19 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot 2 AA Gachika (GrainPro) 7457 60kg 49 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot 2 AA Gondo (GrainPro) 7458 60kg 56 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot 2 AA Rianjagi Café (GrainPro) 7460 60kg 47 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot 2 AA Gondo (GrainPro) 7462 60kg 56 OPEN   origin
Kenya Microlot 3 French Mission Natural (GrainPro) 7243 60kg 82 AFLOAT afloat Chocolate and fruity pebbles. Chocolate and fruity pebbles. This unique varietal is a look back into the past. French Mission is an original Bourbon varietal that was introduced by French Missionaries in the late 1800's. Over 76 centimeters of rain a year, combined with the deep red volcanic soil and temperatures of 22 to 28 degrees Celsius, come together to provide the perfect conditions for this coffee to express its genetic treasures. The Harries family has been growing coffee for almost a century. The family has donated more than 50 acres of land to the Thika Municipal Council and co-founded the Wabeni Technical Institute. This institute seeks to teach underprivileged children practical skills that can help them make a living; e.g. dress making, motor mechanics, and carpentry.
Kenya Microlot 3 Natural (GrainPro) 7244 60kg 11 AFLOAT afloat Smooth, lemon, fruity pebbles, coffee cherry and basil.
Kenya Microlot 4 AA Riuki (GrainPro) 7454 60kg 25 OPEN   origin
Kenya
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Organic Organic - Non Fair Trade Muiri (GrainPro) 7066 60kg 90 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Tart and lively acidity with savory, floral and toffee flavors. Tart and lively acidity with savory, floral and toffee flavors.   We are excited to partner up with this rare Kenyan Organic farm.  The Muiri Estate has been certified organic since 2008.  The owners have been fertilizing with organic material--a rareity of its own in Kenya. We are looking forward to develop its fullest potential in the coming years! Farm Size 179 hectares of land, 16 hectares dam, 87 hectares of coffee (100% Organic) Processing Method Wet processing. Timely and selective hand picking is carried out at the wet mill. Cherry is delivered to the wet mill the same day it is picked. Cherry sorting is carried out at the wet mill prior to the pulping. Red ripe cherries are separated from underipes, overipes and foreign matter. Processing utilizes clean water (wet processing) that is recirculated before disposal into seepage pits. Sun drying is done before delivery of the coffee to the dry mill for secondary processing. Certifications Organic (NOP & EU) IMO Story The farm was previously known as Kihoto farm (1969-1975). Later changed in 1976 to Muiri coffee estate after an African tree species called pruners (Muiri in kikuyu language). This is a farm developed with coffee plantations, a wet mill, borehole, large dam, stores and labour cottages. Muiri Coffee Estate consists of about 110,000 trees (Sl28, Sl34, K7), with over 46,000 trees of Ruiru 11 interplanted in some of the blocks, 156,000 coffee trees in total. The farm has over 200 different species of other trees which were planted between the years 2000-2002. Gravellier, approx 25,000 trees, Eucalyptus, appox 40,000. Silver Oak 8,000, Neem 1,000 and 20,000 of different species, about 94,000 trees in total. To help farm workers and their families, we have allocated land to over 1,000 families for cultivation of beans. The Farm has been certified Organic from 2008 to date.
Kenya
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Spl Cat 200 AB 6491 60kg 46 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Heavy and savory with chocolate.
Kenya
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Spl Cat 400 AB Ngutu (GrainPro) 6548 60kg 33 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Caramel, herbaceous and black tea with citric and malic acidity. Caramel, herbaceous and black tea with citric and malic acidity. Info provided by: NGUTU WET MILL, RWAIKAMBA FARMERS COOPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED: Timely and selective hand picking is carried out at Ngutu wet mill. Cherry is delivered to the wet mill the same day it is picked. Cherry sorting is carried out at the wet mill prior to pulping. Red ripe cheries are separated from underipes, overipes and foreign matter. Processing utilizes clean river water (wet processing) that is recirculated before disposal into seepage pits. Sun drying is done before delivery of the coffee to the dry mill for secondary processing. RAIKAMBA FARMERS COOPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED Historical Background: Farmers in Rwaikamba planted their coffee trees in early 1950s. The coop has 7 wet mills namely Ngutu, kahiriga , Kiawanduma, Karuya, Kahete, Kagumo and Kanjahi. It is located on the highly productive Eastern slopes of Aberdare ranges and Southern side of Mt Kenya. Management & Membership: The coop is managed by 7 committee members. The secretary manager is the executive officer responsible for day to day management of the coop activities, supported by 28 permanent staff. The coop has a membership of 4000 farmers. Coffee Production: The production of Ngutu wet mill currently stands at an annual average of 350000 kg of cherry. Coffee Processing and Marketing: Farmers selectively hand pick red ripe cherries that are delivered for wet milling the same day. The parchment is then fermented, washed and sun dried . Dry parchment is milled and bagged at Central Kenya Mills Ltd, marketed by Coffee Management Services Ltd and exported by Sangana Commodities limited. The Coffee is then sold either through the Nairobi auction or direct to overseas buyers. Average Farm Size:0.5-1.0 acres - 200 trees per farm Number of producers:1200 Members Exporter:Sangana Commodities Harvest: Main crop: October-November; Fly crop: March- April Average Rainfall:1200 -1500 mm per year. The rains are in two seasons , short and long rains. Main crop depends on long rains that come between April and June. Early/ fly crop dependes on short rains received between October and November Processing: Timely and selective hand picking is carried out at Ngutu wet mill. Cherry is delivered to the wet mill the same day it is picked. Cherry sorting is carried out at the wet mill prior to pulping. Red ripe cheries are separated from underipes, overipes and foreign matter. Processing utilizes clean river water (wet processing) that is recirculated before disposal into seepage pits. Sun drying is done before delivery of the coffee to the dry mill for secondary processing.
Kenya Spl Cat 500 PB Chania (GrainPro) 7456 60kg 17 OPEN   origin
Kona
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Extra Fancy   6951 100kg 1 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Floral perfume with tart lime and fresh herb flavors.
Kona
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Fancy   6950 100kg 1 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Mild, with lemon and sweetgrass.
Kona
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Fancy 18 Screen 7040 100kg 48 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric acidity with sweet grass and nut flavors.
Kona
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Prime   6377 100kg 8 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Herbal and lemon.
Kona
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Prime 16/17 Screen 6936 100kg 25 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Mesquite and herb.
Kona Prime 16 Screen 7041 100kg 13 IN TRANSIT TO MSP   afloat
Kona Prime   7442 100kg 37 IN TRANSIT TO MSP   afloat
Mexico
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Altura Veracruz SHG EP Finca Santa Rosa Teocelo (GrainPro) 6302 69kg 56 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Nutty, with mild citric acidity. Nutty, with mild citric acidity. This farm was established in 1974 under Senora Maria Enriqueta Sanchez Bravo, but they have been cultivating coffee here since 1950. The farm was taken over by professors Olivia Hernandez Virues and Ranulfo Lara in 1978 There is a gorgeous vacation lodge on the property, and we are very excited to be partnering with such a well run farm.    Read more from the BLOG on this competition! See more photos from Mexico HERE
Mexico
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Altura Veracruz SHG EP Finca Santa Rosa Teocelo (GrainPro) 6625 69kg 18 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Heavy mouthfeel with citric acidity and cedar flavors. Heavy mouthfeel with citric acidity and cedar flavors. This farm was established in 1974 under Senora Maria Enriqueta Sanchez Bravo, but they have been cultivating coffee here since 1950. The farm was taken over by professors Olivia Hernandez Virues and Ranulfo Lara in 1978 There is a gorgeous vacation lodge on the property, and we are very excited to be partnering with such a well run farm.    Read more from the BLOG on this competition! See more photos from Mexico HERE
Mexico Chiapas SHG EP Finca Santa Teresa (GrainPro) 7139 69kg 195 OPEN origin Third generation farmer Erwin Pohlenz farms 300 hectares that serve as a buffer for the Triunfo biosphere reserve. His farm is 50% Pacas(yes, the Salvadorian varietal) and 50% Mundo Novo. It sits between 1,200 and 1,600 meters. They pick only ripe cherries. They are fully washed, patio dried and stored in a cool and stable environment on the farm until shipping. .  They are working towards RFA certification and have most of the environmental and social practices in place.  Viva Mexico! Click here for more pictures of Mexico and its coffee growing regions. 
Mexico Chiapas SHG EP Finca El Retiro Jaltenango (GrainPro) 7176 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
Mexico Chiapas SHG EP Finca Santa Teresa (GrainPro) 7206 69kg 115 OPEN origin Third generation farmer Erwin Pohlenz farms 300 hectares that serve as a buffer for the Triunfo biosphere reserve. His farm is 50% Pacas(yes, the Salvadorian varietal) and 50% Mundo Novo. It sits between 1,200 and 1,600 meters. They pick only ripe cherries. They are fully washed, patio dried and stored in a cool and stable environment on the farm until shipping. .  They are working towards RFA certification and have most of the environmental and social practices in place.  Viva Mexico! Click here for more pictures of Mexico and its coffee growing regions. 
Mexico Chiapas SHG EP Finca Santa Teresa (GrainPro) 7207 69kg 275 OPEN origin Third generation farmer Erwin Pohlenz farms 300 hectares that serve as a buffer for the Triunfo biosphere reserve. His farm is 50% Pacas(yes, the Salvadorian varietal) and 50% Mundo Novo. It sits between 1,200 and 1,600 meters. They pick only ripe cherries. They are fully washed, patio dried and stored in a cool and stable environment on the farm until shipping. .  They are working towards RFA certification and have most of the environmental and social practices in place.  Viva Mexico! Click here for more pictures of Mexico and its coffee growing regions. 
Mexico Chiapas SHG EP Finca Santa Teresa (GrainPro) 7208 69kg 275 OPEN origin Third generation farmer Erwin Pohlenz farms 300 hectares that serve as a buffer for the Triunfo biosphere reserve. His farm is 50% Pacas(yes, the Salvadorian varietal) and 50% Mundo Novo. It sits between 1,200 and 1,600 meters. They pick only ripe cherries. They are fully washed, patio dried and stored in a cool and stable environment on the farm until shipping. .  They are working towards RFA certification and have most of the environmental and social practices in place.  Viva Mexico! Click here for more pictures of Mexico and its coffee growing regions. 
Mexico
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Cristal XPW Crystal 7014 69kg 3 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric and nutty.
Mexico
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Cristal XPW Crystal 7016 69kg 6 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Toffee, lemon and round.
Mexico Cristal XPW Crystal 7018 69kg 150 OPEN origin Chocolate, with a nutty aftertaste.
Mexico Cristal XPW Crystal 7019 69kg 150 OPEN   origin
Mexico Cristal XPW Crystal 7021 69kg 236 OPEN   origin
Mexico Cristal XPW Crystal 7022 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
Mexico Cristal XPW Crystal 7023 69kg 155 OPEN   origin
Mexico
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Cristal   7393 69kg 275 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Smooth with nut brittle and herb.
Mexico Decaf FTO MWP Fair Trade Organic Decaf Origin Select - TECPATLAN FLO ID 27508 7441 69kg 256 OPEN   origin
Mexico
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Decaf Origin Select Decaf - Non FT or Org MWP 6626 69kg 34 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Heavy and citric.
Mexico Decaffeinated HG MC Decaf - Non FT or Org   7193 69kg 175 OPEN   origin
Mexico
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FTO Altura Fair Trade Organic Comon Yaj Noptic Coop - Joaquin Hernandez Gomez - FLO ID 19480 (GrainPro) 6277 69kg 5 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Tart, toffee, lemon and nutty. Tart, toffee, lemon and nutty. The country of Mexico has never been a player in the High-End Specialty Coffee world until recently.  The perception of many in the industry is that Mexican coffee is mediocre to say the least.  This is not entirely true by any means.  There is huge potential in Mexican coffee and things will only get better.  We’ve been sourcing coffee from the south of Mexico in the state of Chiapas from a couple different cooperatives, Finca Triunfo Verde (FTV), Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH), and Comon Yaj Noptic (Comon) this year.  The cup quality on these has been solid year after year.  Both of these commercialize their coffee through a 3rd party allowing them to do what they do best, produce solid coffee.  There is no reason why this area can’t produce great coffee!  They have all the conditions such as: heirloom coffee varieties (Bourbon, Typica), great altitude (1200-1750masl), and passionate coffee growers who want to produce high quality micro lots.  The location is extremely close to the Guatemala border and Huehuetenango.                               <p 0px="" 12px="" a="" aid="" al="" already="" an="" and="" are="" areas="" as:="" assessment="" be="" but="" c="" cafe="" centralized="" certified="" coffee="" cooperative="" cooperatives="" could="" cup="" cupping="" different="" doing="" each="" excited="" extremely="" feedback="" font-family:="" font-size:="" from="" give="" grader="" great="" have="" impact="" in="" increase="" invested="" is="" job="" lab="" line-height:="" lot="" made="" margin:="" new="" of="" order="" overall="" p="" padding:="" part="" plan="" producers="" producing="" q="" quality="" selecti="" some="" rgb(0,="" 0,="" 0);="" 'palatino="" linotype',="" 'book="" antiqua',="" palatino,="" freeserif,="" serif;="" medium;="" 24px;"="" such="" that="" the="" their="" there="" they="" this="" times="" to="" use="" was="" were="" with="">Some members of the cooperatives were excited about being able to produce micro lots which are farm and variety specific.  This year we will be bringing a couple of these to complement our full container lots.
Mexico
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FTO Altura Fair Trade Organic Comon Yaj Noptic Coop - Ciro Mejia Martinez - FLO ID 19480 (GrainPro) 6279 69kg 1 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Delicate, sweet, citric acidity with a nutty aftertaste. Delicate, sweet, citric acidity with a nutty aftertaste. The country of Mexico has never been a player in the High-End Specialty Coffee world until recently.  The perception of many in the industry is that Mexican coffee is mediocre to say the least.  This is not entirely true by any means.  There is huge potential in Mexican coffee and things will only get better.  We’ve been sourcing coffee from the south of Mexico in the state of Chiapas from a couple different cooperatives, Finca Triunfo Verde (FTV), Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH), and Comon Yaj Noptic (Comon) this year.  The cup quality on these has been solid year after year.  Both of these commercialize their coffee through a 3rd party allowing them to do what they do best, produce solid coffee.  There is no reason why this area can’t produce great coffee!  They have all the conditions such as: heirloom coffee varieties (Bourbon, Typica), great altitude (1200-1750masl), and passionate coffee growers who want to produce high quality micro lots.  The location is extremely close to the Guatemala border and Huehuetenango.                   <p 0px="" 12px="" a="" aid="" al="" already="" an="" and="" are="" areas="" as:="" assessment="" be="" but="" c="" cafe="" centralized="" certified="" coffee="" cooperative="" cooperatives="" could="" cup="" cupping="" different="" doing="" each="" excited="" extremely="" feedback="" font-family:="" font-size:="" from="" give="" grader="" great="" have="" impact="" in="" increase="" invested="" is="" job="" lab="" line-height:="" lot="" made="" margin:="" new="" of="" order="" overall="" p="" padding:="" part="" plan="" producers="" producing="" q="" quality="" selecti="" some="" rgb(0,="" 0,="" 0);="" 'palatino="" linotype',="" 'book="" antiqua',="" palatino,="" freeserif,="" serif;="" medium;="" 24px;"="" such="" that="" the="" their="" there="" they="" this="" times="" to="" use="" was="" were="" with="">Some members of the cooperatives were excited about being able to produce micro lots which are farm and variety specific.  This year we will be bringing a couple of these to complement our full container lots.
Mexico
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FTO Altura Fair Trade Organic Comon Yaj Noptic Coop - Eigar Velasquez Perez - FLO ID 19480 (GrainPro) 6280 69kg 4 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Nutty, lemon and toffee. Nutty, lemon and toffee. The country of Mexico has never been a player in the High-End Specialty Coffee world until recently.  The perception of many in the industry is that Mexican coffee is mediocre to say the least.  This is not entirely true by any means.  There is huge potential in Mexican coffee and things will only get better.  We’ve been sourcing coffee from the south of Mexico in the state of Chiapas from a couple different cooperatives, Finca Triunfo Verde (FTV), Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH), and Comon Yaj Noptic (Comon) this year.  The cup quality on these has been solid year after year.  Both of these commercialize their coffee through a 3rd party allowing them to do what they do best, produce solid coffee.  There is no reason why this area can’t produce great coffee!  They have all the conditions such as: heirloom coffee varieties (Bourbon, Typica), great altitude (1200-1750masl), and passionate coffee growers who want to produce high quality micro lots.  The location is extremely close to the Guatemala border and Huehuetenango.                                                   <p 0px="" 12px="" a="" aid="" al="" already="" an="" and="" are="" areas="" as:="" assessment="" be="" but="" c="" cafe="" centralized="" certified="" coffee="" cooperative="" cooperatives="" could="" cup="" cupping="" different="" doing="" each="" excited="" extremely="" feedback="" font-family:="" font-size:="" from="" give="" grader="" great="" have="" impact="" in="" increase="" invested="" is="" job="" lab="" line-height:="" lot="" made="" margin:="" new="" of="" order="" overall="" p="" padding:="" part="" plan="" producers="" producing="" q="" quality="" selecti="" some="" rgb(0,="" 0,="" 0);="" 'palatino="" linotype',="" 'book="" antiqua',="" palatino,="" freeserif,="" serif;="" medium;="" 24px;"="" such="" that="" the="" their="" there="" they="" this="" times="" to="" use="" was="" were="" with="">Some members of the cooperatives were excited about being able to produce micro lots which are farm and variety specific.  This year we will be bringing a couple of these to complement our full container lots.
Mexico
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FTO Altura Fair Trade Organic Comon Yaj Noptic Coop - Bernabe Bonifas Martinez - FLO ID 19480 (GrainPro) 6282 69kg 4 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric acidity, chocolate, and a nutty aftertaste. Citric acidity, chocolate, and a nutty aftertaste. The country of Mexico has never been a player in the High-End Specialty Coffee world until recently.  The perception of many in the industry is that Mexican coffee is mediocre to say the least.  This is not entirely true by any means.  There is huge potential in Mexican coffee and things will only get better.  We’ve been sourcing coffee from the south of Mexico in the state of Chiapas from a couple different cooperatives, Finca Triunfo Verde (FTV), Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH), and Comon Yaj Noptic (Comon) this year.  The cup quality on these has been solid year after year.  Both of these commercialize their coffee through a 3rd party allowing them to do what they do best, produce solid coffee.  There is no reason why this area can’t produce great coffee!  They have all the conditions such as: heirloom coffee varieties (Bourbon, Typica), great altitude (1200-1750masl), and passionate coffee growers who want to produce high quality micro lots.  The location is extremely close to the Guatemala border and Huehuetenango.                               <p 0px="" 12px="" a="" aid="" al="" already="" an="" and="" are="" areas="" as:="" assessment="" be="" but="" c="" cafe="" centralized="" certified="" coffee="" cooperative="" cooperatives="" could="" cup="" cupping="" different="" doing="" each="" excited="" extremely="" feedback="" font-family:="" font-size:="" from="" give="" grader="" great="" have="" impact="" in="" increase="" invested="" is="" job="" lab="" line-height:="" lot="" made="" margin:="" new="" of="" order="" overall="" p="" padding:="" part="" plan="" producers="" producing="" q="" quality="" selecti="" some="" rgb(0,="" 0,="" 0);="" 'palatino="" linotype',="" 'book="" antiqua',="" palatino,="" freeserif,="" serif;="" medium;="" 24px;"="" such="" that="" the="" their="" there="" they="" this="" times="" to="" use="" was="" were="" with="">Some members of the cooperatives were excited about being able to produce micro lots which are farm and variety specific.  This year we will be bringing a couple of these to complement our full container lots.
Mexico
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FTO Altura Chiapas Fair Trade Organic CESMACH Coop - El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve, FLO ID 935 (GrainPro) 5765 69kg 4 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Nutty, with citric acidity. Nutty, with citric acidity. To view images of CESMACH click here To view images of Union Triunfo Dry Mill and Cupping Training click here El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve Shade Grown Sustainable Coffee Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH) The CESMACH Co-op is comprised of 478 members Until recently, the country of Mexico had never been a player in the High-End Specialty Coffee world. The perception of many in the industry was that Mexican coffee is mediocre to say the least, but now those ideas are shifting as more and more exceptional Mexican coffee makes it to market. There is huge potential in Mexican coffee and things will only get better. We've been sourcing coffee from the south of Mexico in the state of Chiapas from a couple different cooperatives, Finca Triunfo Verde (FTV) and Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH). The cup quality on these has been solid year after year. Both of these commercialize their coffee through a 3rd party allowing them to do what they do best, produce solid coffee. There is no reason why this area can't produce great coffee! They have all the conditions such as: heirloom coffee varieties (Bourbon, Typica), great altitude (1200-1750masl), and passionate coffee growers who want to produce high quality micro lots. The location is extremely close to the Guatemala border and Huehuetenango. Cafe Imports, along with the cooperatives, invested in a quality control program. An assessment was made in different areas that impact cup quality such as: varieties, fertilization, picking, processing, and lot selection. They were already doing a great job but there are some areas that could use some tweaking. The cooperatives were extremely excited to be part in this program. The plan is to have a certified Q Grader from each cooperative and have a centralized cupping lab to aid in lot selection in order to increase the overall quality of the coffee they are producing and give feedback to the producers on their quality. Some members of the cooperatives were excited about being able to produce micro lots which are farm and variety specific. This year we will be bringing a couple of these to complement our full container lots. -Piero About the the farms and El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve: Farms are located in the buffer zone of El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve. The biosphere is located in the highlands of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas, El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve is one of the world's most diverse forest reserves. This reserve contains Meso-America's largest continuous cloud forest, and it serves as a refuge to thousands of plant and animal species. El Triunfo is a rare and valuable sanctuary that requires continued protection. All the coffee they produce is shade grown, and biological corridors are created in order to facilitate bird and animal migration.
Mexico
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FTO Altura Chiapas Fair Trade Organic CESMACH Coop - El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve, FLO ID 935 (GrainPro) 5869 69kg 13 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric, nutty and toffee. Citric, nutty and toffee. To view images of CESMACH click here To view images of Union Triunfo Dry Mill and Cupping Training click here El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve Shade Grown Sustainable Coffee Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH) The CESMACH Co-op is comprised of 478 members Until recently, the country of Mexico had never been a player in the High-End Specialty Coffee world. The perception of many in the industry was that Mexican coffee is mediocre to say the least, but now those ideas are shifting as more and more exceptional Mexican coffee makes it to market. There is huge potential in Mexican coffee and things will only get better. We've been sourcing coffee from the south of Mexico in the state of Chiapas from a couple different cooperatives, Finca Triunfo Verde (FTV) and Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH). The cup quality on these has been solid year after year. Both of these commercialize their coffee through a 3rd party allowing them to do what they do best, produce solid coffee. There is no reason why this area can't produce great coffee! They have all the conditions such as: heirloom coffee varieties (Bourbon, Typica), great altitude (1200-1750masl), and passionate coffee growers who want to produce high quality micro lots. The location is extremely close to the Guatemala border and Huehuetenango. Cafe Imports, along with the cooperatives, invested in a quality control program. An assessment was made in different areas that impact cup quality such as: varieties, fertilization, picking, processing, and lot selection. They were already doing a great job but there are some areas that could use some tweaking. The cooperatives were extremely excited to be part in this program. The plan is to have a certified Q Grader from each cooperative and have a centralized cupping lab to aid in lot selection in order to increase the overall quality of the coffee they are producing and give feedback to the producers on their quality. Some members of the cooperatives were excited about being able to produce micro lots which are farm and variety specific. This year we will be bringing a couple of these to complement our full container lots. -Piero About the the farms and El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve: Farms are located in the buffer zone of El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve. The biosphere is located in the highlands of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas, El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve is one of the world's most diverse forest reserves. This reserve contains Meso-America's largest continuous cloud forest, and it serves as a refuge to thousands of plant and animal species. El Triunfo is a rare and valuable sanctuary that requires continued protection. All the coffee they produce is shade grown, and biological corridors are created in order to facilitate bird and animal migration.
Mexico
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FTO Altura Chiapas Fair Trade Organic Triunfo Verde Coop - El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve, FLO ID 3116 - Corazon de Jesus Perez Roblero (GrainPro) 6472 69kg 13 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric and nutty. Citric and nutty. To view images of CESMACH click here To view images of Union Triunfo Dry Mill and Cupping Training click here El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve Shade Grown Sustainable Coffee Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH) 478 members Until recently, the country of Mexico had never been a player in the High-End Specialty Coffee world. The perception of many in the industry was that Mexican coffee is mediocre to say the least, but now those ideas are shifting as more and more exceptional Mexican coffee makes it to market. There is huge potential in Mexican coffee and things will only get better. We have been sourcing coffee from the south of Mexico in the state of Chiapas from a couple different cooperatives, Finca Triunfo Verde (FTV) and Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH). The cup quality on these has been solid year after year. Both of these commercialize their coffee through a 3rd party allowing them to do what they do best, produce solid coffee. There is no reason why this area can't produce great coffee! They have all the conditions such as: heirloom coffee varieties (Bourbon, Typica), great altitude (1200-1750masl), and passionate coffee growers who want to produce high quality micro lots. The location is extremely close to the Guatemala border and Huehuetenango. Cafe Imports, along with the cooperatives, invested in a quality control program. An assessment was made in different areas that impact cup quality such as: varieties, fertilization, picking, processing, and lot selection. They were already doing a great job but there are some areas that could use some tweaking. The cooperatives were extremely excited to be part in this program. The plan is to have a certified Q Grader from each cooperative and have a centralized cupping lab to aid in lot selection in order to increase the overall quality of the coffee they are producing and give feedback to the producers on their quality. Some members of the cooperatives were excited about being able to produce micro lots which are farm and variety specific. This year we will be bringing a couple of these to complement our full container lots. -Piero ----------------------------------------------------- About the the farms and El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve Farms are located in the buffer zone of El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve. The biosphere is located in the highlands of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas, El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve is one of the world's most diverse forest reserves. This reserve contains Mesoamerica's largest continuous cloud forest, and it serves as a refuge to thousands of plant and animal species. El Triunfo is a rare and valuable sanctuary that requires continued protection. All the coffee they produce is shade grown, and biological corridors are created in order to facilitate bird and animal migration.
Mexico
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FTO Altura Chiapas Fair Trade Organic Triunfo Verde Coop - El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve, FLO ID 3116 - Esteban Guzman Mendez (GrainPro) 6474 69kg 22 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Dark chocolate and nut. Dark chocolate and nut. To view images of CESMACH click here To view images of Union Triunfo Dry Mill and Cupping Training click here El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve Shade Grown Sustainable Coffee Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH) 478 members Until recently, the country of Mexico had never been a player in the High-End Specialty Coffee world. The perception of many in the industry was that Mexican coffee is mediocre to say the least, but now those ideas are shifting as more and more exceptional Mexican coffee makes it to market. There is huge potential in Mexican coffee and things will only get better. We have been sourcing coffee from the south of Mexico in the state of Chiapas from a couple different cooperatives, Finca Triunfo Verde (FTV) and Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH). The cup quality on these has been solid year after year. Both of these commercialize their coffee through a 3rd party allowing them to do what they do best, produce solid coffee. There is no reason why this area can't produce great coffee! They have all the conditions such as: heirloom coffee varieties (Bourbon, Typica), great altitude (1200-1750masl), and passionate coffee growers who want to produce high quality micro lots. The location is extremely close to the Guatemala border and Huehuetenango. Cafe Imports, along with the cooperatives, invested in a quality control program. An assessment was made in different areas that impact cup quality such as: varieties, fertilization, picking, processing, and lot selection. They were already doing a great job but there are some areas that could use some tweaking. The cooperatives were extremely excited to be part in this program. The plan is to have a certified Q Grader from each cooperative and have a centralized cupping lab to aid in lot selection in order to increase the overall quality of the coffee they are producing and give feedback to the producers on their quality. Some members of the cooperatives were excited about being able to produce micro lots which are farm and variety specific. This year we will be bringing a couple of these to complement our full container lots. -Piero ----------------------------------------------------- About the the farms and El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve Farms are located in the buffer zone of El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve. The biosphere is located in the highlands of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas, El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve is one of the world's most diverse forest reserves. This reserve contains Mesoamerica's largest continuous cloud forest, and it serves as a refuge to thousands of plant and animal species. El Triunfo is a rare and valuable sanctuary that requires continued protection. All the coffee they produce is shade grown, and biological corridors are created in order to facilitate bird and animal migration.
Mexico FTO Altura Chiapas 1 Fair Trade Organic CESMACH Coop - El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve, FLO ID 935 (GrainPro) 7212 69kg 60 OPEN origin Chocolate and nut with tart citric acidity. Chocolate and nut with tart citric acidity. To view images of CESMACH click here To view images of Union Triunfo Dry Mill and Cupping Training click here El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve Shade Grown Sustainable Coffee Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH) The CESMACH Co-op is comprised of 478 members Until recently, the country of Mexico had never been a player in the High-End Specialty Coffee world. The perception of many in the industry was that Mexican coffee is mediocre to say the least, but now those ideas are shifting as more and more exceptional Mexican coffee makes it to market. There is huge potential in Mexican coffee and things will only get better. We've been sourcing coffee from the south of Mexico in the state of Chiapas from a couple different cooperatives, Finca Triunfo Verde (FTV) and Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH). The cup quality on these has been solid year after year. Both of these commercialize their coffee through a 3rd party allowing them to do what they do best, produce solid coffee. There is no reason why this area can't produce great coffee! They have all the conditions such as: heirloom coffee varieties (Bourbon, Typica), great altitude (1200-1750masl), and passionate coffee growers who want to produce high quality micro lots. The location is extremely close to the Guatemala border and Huehuetenango. Cafe Imports, along with the cooperatives, invested in a quality control program. An assessment was made in different areas that impact cup quality such as: varieties, fertilization, picking, processing, and lot selection. They were already doing a great job but there are some areas that could use some tweaking. The cooperatives were extremely excited to be part in this program. The plan is to have a certified Q Grader from each cooperative and have a centralized cupping lab to aid in lot selection in order to increase the overall quality of the coffee they are producing and give feedback to the producers on their quality. Some members of the cooperatives were excited about being able to produce micro lots which are farm and variety specific. This year we will be bringing a couple of these to complement our full container lots. -Piero About the the farms and El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve: Farms are located in the buffer zone of El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve. The biosphere is located in the highlands of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas, El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve is one of the world's most diverse forest reserves. This reserve contains Meso-America's largest continuous cloud forest, and it serves as a refuge to thousands of plant and animal species. El Triunfo is a rare and valuable sanctuary that requires continued protection. All the coffee they produce is shade grown, and biological corridors are created in order to facilitate bird and animal migration.
Mexico FTO Altura Chiapas 1 Fair Trade Organic CESMACH Coop - El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve, FLO ID 935 (GrainPro) 7213 69kg 185 OPEN origin To view images of CESMACH click here To view images of Union Triunfo Dry Mill and Cupping Training click here El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve Shade Grown Sustainable Coffee Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH) The CESMACH Co-op is comprised of 478 members Until recently, the country of Mexico had never been a player in the High-End Specialty Coffee world. The perception of many in the industry was that Mexican coffee is mediocre to say the least, but now those ideas are shifting as more and more exceptional Mexican coffee makes it to market. There is huge potential in Mexican coffee and things will only get better. We've been sourcing coffee from the south of Mexico in the state of Chiapas from a couple different cooperatives, Finca Triunfo Verde (FTV) and Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH). The cup quality on these has been solid year after year. Both of these commercialize their coffee through a 3rd party allowing them to do what they do best, produce solid coffee. There is no reason why this area can't produce great coffee! They have all the conditions such as: heirloom coffee varieties (Bourbon, Typica), great altitude (1200-1750masl), and passionate coffee growers who want to produce high quality micro lots. The location is extremely close to the Guatemala border and Huehuetenango. Cafe Imports, along with the cooperatives, invested in a quality control program. An assessment was made in different areas that impact cup quality such as: varieties, fertilization, picking, processing, and lot selection. They were already doing a great job but there are some areas that could use some tweaking. The cooperatives were extremely excited to be part in this program. The plan is to have a certified Q Grader from each cooperative and have a centralized cupping lab to aid in lot selection in order to increase the overall quality of the coffee they are producing and give feedback to the producers on their quality. Some members of the cooperatives were excited about being able to produce micro lots which are farm and variety specific. This year we will be bringing a couple of these to complement our full container lots. -Piero About the the farms and El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve: Farms are located in the buffer zone of El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve. The biosphere is located in the highlands of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas, El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve is one of the world's most diverse forest reserves. This reserve contains Meso-America's largest continuous cloud forest, and it serves as a refuge to thousands of plant and animal species. El Triunfo is a rare and valuable sanctuary that requires continued protection. All the coffee they produce is shade grown, and biological corridors are created in order to facilitate bird and animal migration.
Mexico FTO Altura Chiapas 1 Fair Trade Organic CESMACH Coop - El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve, FLO ID 935 (GrainPro) 7214 69kg 227 OPEN origin To view images of CESMACH click here To view images of Union Triunfo Dry Mill and Cupping Training click here El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve Shade Grown Sustainable Coffee Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH) The CESMACH Co-op is comprised of 478 members Until recently, the country of Mexico had never been a player in the High-End Specialty Coffee world. The perception of many in the industry was that Mexican coffee is mediocre to say the least, but now those ideas are shifting as more and more exceptional Mexican coffee makes it to market. There is huge potential in Mexican coffee and things will only get better. We've been sourcing coffee from the south of Mexico in the state of Chiapas from a couple different cooperatives, Finca Triunfo Verde (FTV) and Campesinos Ecologicos de la Sierra Madre de Chiapas (CESMACH). The cup quality on these has been solid year after year. Both of these commercialize their coffee through a 3rd party allowing them to do what they do best, produce solid coffee. There is no reason why this area can't produce great coffee! They have all the conditions such as: heirloom coffee varieties (Bourbon, Typica), great altitude (1200-1750masl), and passionate coffee growers who want to produce high quality micro lots. The location is extremely close to the Guatemala border and Huehuetenango. Cafe Imports, along with the cooperatives, invested in a quality control program. An assessment was made in different areas that impact cup quality such as: varieties, fertilization, picking, processing, and lot selection. They were already doing a great job but there are some areas that could use some tweaking. The cooperatives were extremely excited to be part in this program. The plan is to have a certified Q Grader from each cooperative and have a centralized cupping lab to aid in lot selection in order to increase the overall quality of the coffee they are producing and give feedback to the producers on their quality. Some members of the cooperatives were excited about being able to produce micro lots which are farm and variety specific. This year we will be bringing a couple of these to complement our full container lots. -Piero About the the farms and El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve: Farms are located in the buffer zone of El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve. The biosphere is located in the highlands of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas, El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve is one of the world's most diverse forest reserves. This reserve contains Meso-America's largest continuous cloud forest, and it serves as a refuge to thousands of plant and animal species. El Triunfo is a rare and valuable sanctuary that requires continued protection. All the coffee they produce is shade grown, and biological corridors are created in order to facilitate bird and animal migration.
Mexico FTO Chiapas Fair Trade Organic Sierra Azul FLO ID 27403 7439 69kg 215 OPEN   origin
Mexico FTO Oaxaca Fair Trade Organic HG EP - UNECAFE - FLO ID: 25617 7338 69kg 260 OPEN   origin
Mexico FTO Oaxaca Fair Trade Organic HG EP - UNECAFE - FLO ID: 25617 7339 69kg 275 OPEN   origin
Mexico
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Microlot 2 Lo Mejor de Mexico #1 by Cecilia Avila Camberos - Finca Consolapan (GrainPro) 6214 69kg 4 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Sweet and tangy with green grape and toffee flavors. Sweet and tangy with green grape and toffee flavors. The farm belongs to the Camberos family since about 1930 and have always planted coffee and small amounts of sugar cane.    It is located at 1240 m in the region calls the High Mountains in the state of Veracruz.   This is bordered by the new road - Coatepec Xalapa to the South and old road Xalapa - Coatepec to the North    The land very fertile with an average annual rainfall of 1900 mm. The farm has coffee varieties Typica , Mundo Novo and Garnica planted in a pattern of shaded coffee production to keep the trees healthy.   The pickers are extremely disciplined, only picking ripe coffee beans.  The use a wet fermentation process, the resulting beans are then given a second rinse and soak in rain water. The coffee is dried on raised beds. This is a totally organic process.   The farm production is advised through the AMSA's Carlos Sánchez since 2008.    The program includes tree management (pruning ) , renovation of coffee plantations, shade management , clean and integrated pest management ( phytosanitary control program CBB ) application of dolomitic lime, foliar and soil fertilization . They do not use herbicides.   This land and these producers create truly world class coffee that is just now beginning to be recognized for their quality.  They placed third in 2010 for this competition.     Read more from the BLOG on this competition!   See more photos from Mexico HERE
Mexico
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Spl Cat 100 Small Holder Select Lot (GrainPro) 7162 69kg 110 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Cocoa, nutty.
Nicaragua FTO Segovia Fair Trade Organic UCA San Juan, FLO ID 2967 (GrainPro) 7227 69kg 269 OPEN origin Unión de Cooperativas Agropecuarias de San Juan del Río Coco (UCA San Juan) is located in the northeaster region of Nicaragua. UCA San Juan was founded in 1993 by the initiative of 11 cooperatives from San Juan del Rio Coco and Telpaneca. UCA San Juan is a union of 8 cooperatives with 370 active members. 75% of the coffee is grown and certified as organic. The average size of the farm is 5.6 hectares. The objective of the cooperative is to “promote economic and social development of the member cooperatives and their members, through the production and marketing of coffee, in an economically profitable and environmentally responsible way.”
Nicaragua SHG EP   7219 69kg 165 OPEN   origin
Panama Boquete Traditional Kotowa (GrainPro) 7115 60kg 300 OPEN origin Kotowa, meaning "mountain" in the language of the indigenous Ngobe community, is an organization that consistently produces some of the highest quality coffees in Panama. The Kotowa coffee produced in an area surronded by mountains and a volcano. During the harvest, the cherries are picked carefully and after picked they are depulp with modern equipment. The water used in the mill comes from natural sources, it's pure water The traceability managment allows to trace all the coffee that is procces in the mill, each lot has their own code in order to be traced.
Panama Boquete Traditional Kotowa (GrainPro) 7116 60kg 210 OPEN origin Kotowa, meaning "mountain" in the language of the indigenous Ngobe community, is an organization that consistently produces some of the highest quality coffees in Panama. The Kotowa coffee produced in an area surronded by mountains and a volcano. During the harvest, the cherries are picked carefully and after picked they are depulp with modern equipment. The water used in the mill comes from natural sources, it's pure water The traceability managment allows to trace all the coffee that is procces in the mill, each lot has their own code in order to be traced.
Panama Org SHB EP Boquete Organic - Non Fair Trade Kotowa Duncan (GrainPro) 7118 60kg 45 OPEN origin Kotowa, meaning "mountain" in the language of the indigenous Ngobe community, is an organization that consistently produces some of the highest quality coffees in Panama. Known for their old river powered mill, they have recently constructed a new facility to meet the increasing demand for their crop. The Finca Duncan lot is certified Organic and is operated on principles of ecological responsibility and sensitivity.
Panama SHB EP Boquete Kotowa Don K (GrainPro) 7117 60kg 15 OPEN origin Kotowa, meaning "mountain" in the language of the indigenous Ngobe community, is an organization that consistently produces some of the highest quality coffees in Panama. Known for their old river powered mill, they have recently constructed a new facility to meet the increasing demand for their crop.
Papua New Guinea A Ulya (GrainPro) 7377 60kg 320 OPEN origin The Ulya plantation is located next Ulya Mill in the hear of Waghi Valley. The high altitude and cooler climate in Ulya is ideal for the cultivation of quality coffee. The plantation supplies high quality cherries to be procees at the mill. The milll has recently expanded its milling capacity, including a new wet-milling line, and waste water processing plant. Ulya Mill also processes cherry from the surrounding coffee blocks of the Ulya Plantation. The beans have similar characteristics tothe Ulya Plantation coffee. The coffee from this area is sold as a high end plantation style under the banner Ulya AX. With certified Chain of Custody processed in place for the mill, Monpi guarantees traceability and quality of its Ulya beans.
Papua New Guinea A Kunjin (GrainPro) 7379 60kg 320 OPEN origin PNG is an extremely diverse country with over 800 different languages spoken.  Most of the tribes from the highlands had contact with white men not until the 1930s as exploration in PNG had been minimal.  PNG is now a paradox between Western influence and indigenous traditions. Commercial coffee production started in Papua New Guinea in the 1920s with seeds brought from Jamaica’s Blue Mountain, a Typica known as Jamaica Blue Mountain.  At that time most of the coffee production came from 18 large plantations.  Plantations still exist in PNG but it only accounts for 15% of the total production; most of the production now comes from small-holders who tend to their coffee gardens, as they call them locally.  The small-holders are subsistence farmers (meaning they live of their land) and they also grow coffee--there are no coffee farmers per-se.  Each garden might have anywhere from a couple to a couple hundred trees of coffee and parchment deliveries can range from 25 - 65 kg. Kunjin comes from small-holders between 1400 - 1800 masl from the Waghi Valley in Western Highlands in close proximity to the town of Mt Hagen.  Coffee is being processed this year (2013) in a leased vintage John Gordon brand wet-mill.  The hopes is that the mill where the coffee will be processed next year will be owned and operated by our partners on the ground with brand new Pinhalense machinery.  This should allow us to have access to better quality the coming years. Personally, I’m really excited to work with PNG as a coffee producing country being culturally and socially as foreign as it gets.  During my first visit in 2012 my luggage was left in Jakarta and I wouldn’t get it back until my way out of PNG.  I took a cab to Vision City Mega Mall, in the capital city of Port Moresby, and bought a Quicksilver t-shirt for $50USD and there weren’t many options.  The Highlander Hotel in Mt Hagen will run you $300USD per night with cockroaches in your room and you might get the suite over the kitchen--good luck sleeping!  On the other hand locals are living off their land with very little income.  One of the reasons of such disparity is that there is a big mining boom as we speak where multinationals are extracting valuable minerals and have brought local prices up as mining is very resource-intensive. PNG is another one of those countries which has great of potential but it is still far away from hitting its peak.  It has heirloom varieties and great altitude, but its social and economic problems makes it extremely hard to achieve top-quality coffee.  We are happy, nonetheless, with the quality we are seeing this year and cleanliness in the cup is one of the biggest attributes for these.  As always, we will push the bar for better quality! -Piero Cristiani
Papua New Guinea A Kunjin (GrainPro) 7383 60kg 320 OPEN origin PNG is an extremely diverse country with over 800 different languages spoken.  Most of the tribes from the highlands had contact with white men not until the 1930s as exploration in PNG had been minimal.  PNG is now a paradox between Western influence and indigenous traditions. Commercial coffee production started in Papua New Guinea in the 1920s with seeds brought from Jamaica’s Blue Mountain, a Typica known as Jamaica Blue Mountain.  At that time most of the coffee production came from 18 large plantations.  Plantations still exist in PNG but it only accounts for 15% of the total production; most of the production now comes from small-holders who tend to their coffee gardens, as they call them locally.  The small-holders are subsistence farmers (meaning they live of their land) and they also grow coffee--there are no coffee farmers per-se.  Each garden might have anywhere from a couple to a couple hundred trees of coffee and parchment deliveries can range from 25 - 65 kg. Kunjin comes from small-holders between 1400 - 1800 masl from the Waghi Valley in Western Highlands in close proximity to the town of Mt Hagen.  Coffee is being processed this year (2013) in a leased vintage John Gordon brand wet-mill.  The hopes is that the mill where the coffee will be processed next year will be owned and operated by our partners on the ground with brand new Pinhalense machinery.  This should allow us to have access to better quality the coming years. Personally, I’m really excited to work with PNG as a coffee producing country being culturally and socially as foreign as it gets.  During my first visit in 2012 my luggage was left in Jakarta and I wouldn’t get it back until my way out of PNG.  I took a cab to Vision City Mega Mall, in the capital city of Port Moresby, and bought a Quicksilver t-shirt for $50USD and there weren’t many options.  The Highlander Hotel in Mt Hagen will run you $300USD per night with cockroaches in your room and you might get the suite over the kitchen--good luck sleeping!  On the other hand locals are living off their land with very little income.  One of the reasons of such disparity is that there is a big mining boom as we speak where multinationals are extracting valuable minerals and have brought local prices up as mining is very resource-intensive. PNG is another one of those countries which has great of potential but it is still far away from hitting its peak.  It has heirloom varieties and great altitude, but its social and economic problems makes it extremely hard to achieve top-quality coffee.  We are happy, nonetheless, with the quality we are seeing this year and cleanliness in the cup is one of the biggest attributes for these.  As always, we will push the bar for better quality! -Piero Cristiani
Papua New Guinea A Kunjin (GrainPro) 7385 60kg 320 OPEN origin PNG is an extremely diverse country with over 800 different languages spoken.  Most of the tribes from the highlands had contact with white men not until the 1930s as exploration in PNG had been minimal.  PNG is now a paradox between Western influence and indigenous traditions. Commercial coffee production started in Papua New Guinea in the 1920s with seeds brought from Jamaica’s Blue Mountain, a Typica known as Jamaica Blue Mountain.  At that time most of the coffee production came from 18 large plantations.  Plantations still exist in PNG but it only accounts for 15% of the total production; most of the production now comes from small-holders who tend to their coffee gardens, as they call them locally.  The small-holders are subsistence farmers (meaning they live of their land) and they also grow coffee--there are no coffee farmers per-se.  Each garden might have anywhere from a couple to a couple hundred trees of coffee and parchment deliveries can range from 25 - 65 kg. Kunjin comes from small-holders between 1400 - 1800 masl from the Waghi Valley in Western Highlands in close proximity to the town of Mt Hagen.  Coffee is being processed this year (2013) in a leased vintage John Gordon brand wet-mill.  The hopes is that the mill where the coffee will be processed next year will be owned and operated by our partners on the ground with brand new Pinhalense machinery.  This should allow us to have access to better quality the coming years. Personally, I’m really excited to work with PNG as a coffee producing country being culturally and socially as foreign as it gets.  During my first visit in 2012 my luggage was left in Jakarta and I wouldn’t get it back until my way out of PNG.  I took a cab to Vision City Mega Mall, in the capital city of Port Moresby, and bought a Quicksilver t-shirt for $50USD and there weren’t many options.  The Highlander Hotel in Mt Hagen will run you $300USD per night with cockroaches in your room and you might get the suite over the kitchen--good luck sleeping!  On the other hand locals are living off their land with very little income.  One of the reasons of such disparity is that there is a big mining boom as we speak where multinationals are extracting valuable minerals and have brought local prices up as mining is very resource-intensive. PNG is another one of those countries which has great of potential but it is still far away from hitting its peak.  It has heirloom varieties and great altitude, but its social and economic problems makes it extremely hard to achieve top-quality coffee.  We are happy, nonetheless, with the quality we are seeing this year and cleanliness in the cup is one of the biggest attributes for these.  As always, we will push the bar for better quality! -Piero Cristiani
Papua New Guinea
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A/X Kunjin - Western Highlands 5192 60kg 5 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Sweet cedar. Sweet cedar. PNG is an extremely diverse country with over 800 different languages spoken.  Most of the tribes from the highlands had contact with white men not until the 1930s as exploration in PNG had been minimal.  PNG is now a paradox between Western influence and indigenous traditions. Commercial coffee production started in Papua New Guinea in the 1920s with seeds brought from Jamaica’s Blue Mountain, a Typica known as Jamaica Blue Mountain.  At that time most of the coffee production came from 18 large plantations.  Plantations still exist in PNG but it only accounts for 15% of the total production; most of the production now comes from small-holders who tend to their coffee gardens, as they call them locally.  The small-holders are subsistence farmers (meaning they live of their land) and they also grow coffee--there are no coffee farmers per-se.  Each garden might have anywhere from a couple to a couple hundred trees of coffee and parchment deliveries can range from 25 - 65 kg. Kunjin comes from small-holders between 1400 - 1800 masl from the Waghi Valley in Western Highlands in close proximity to the town of Mt Hagen.  Coffee is being processed this year (2013) in a leased vintage John Gordon brand wet-mill.  The hopes is that the mill where the coffee will be processed next year will be owned and operated by our partners on the ground with brand new Pinhalense machinery.  This should allow us to have access to better quality the coming years. Personally, I’m really excited to work with PNG as a coffee producing country being culturally and socially as foreign as it gets.  During my first visit in 2012 my luggage was left in Jakarta and I wouldn’t get it back until my way out of PNG.  I took a cab to Vision City Mega Mall, in the capital city of Port Moresby, and bought a Quicksilver t-shirt for $50USD and there weren’t many options.  The Highlander Hotel in Mt Hagen will run you $300USD per night with cockroaches in your room and you might get the suite over the kitchen--good luck sleeping!  On the other hand locals are living off their land with very little income.  One of the reasons of such disparity is that there is a big mining boom as we speak where multinationals are extracting valuable minerals and have brought local prices up as mining is very resource-intensive. PNG is another one of those countries which has great of potential but it is still far away from hitting its peak.  It has heirloom varieties and great altitude, but its social and economic problems makes it extremely hard to achieve top-quality coffee.  We are happy, nonetheless, with the quality we are seeing this year and cleanliness in the cup is one of the biggest attributes for these.  As always, we will push the bar for better quality! -Piero Cristiani
Papua New Guinea
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A/X Kunjin - Western Highlands (GrainPro) 6132 60kg 240 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Soft with buttermilk, floral and herbal flavors. Soft with buttermilk, floral and herbal flavors. PNG is an extremely diverse country with over 800 different languages spoken.  Most of the tribes from the highlands had contact with white men not until the 1930s as exploration in PNG had been minimal.  PNG is now a paradox between Western influence and indigenous traditions. Commercial coffee production started in Papua New Guinea in the 1920s with seeds brought from Jamaica’s Blue Mountain, a Typica known as Jamaica Blue Mountain.  At that time most of the coffee production came from 18 large plantations.  Plantations still exist in PNG but it only accounts for 15% of the total production; most of the production now comes from small-holders who tend to their coffee gardens, as they call them locally.  The small-holders are subsistence farmers (meaning they live of their land) and they also grow coffee--there are no coffee farmers per-se.  Each garden might have anywhere from a couple to a couple hundred trees of coffee and parchment deliveries can range from 25 - 65 kg. Kunjin comes from small-holders between 1400 - 1800 masl from the Waghi Valley in Western Highlands in close proximity to the town of Mt Hagen.  Coffee is being processed this year (2013) in a leased vintage John Gordon brand wet-mill.  The hopes is that the mill where the coffee will be processed next year will be owned and operated by our partners on the ground with brand new Pinhalense machinery.  This should allow us to have access to better quality the coming years. Personally, I’m really excited to work with PNG as a coffee producing country being culturally and socially as foreign as it gets.  During my first visit in 2012 my luggage was left in Jakarta and I wouldn’t get it back until my way out of PNG.  I took a cab to Vision City Mega Mall, in the capital city of Port Moresby, and bought a Quicksilver t-shirt for $50USD and there weren’t many options.  The Highlander Hotel in Mt Hagen will run you $300USD per night with cockroaches in your room and you might get the suite over the kitchen--good luck sleeping!  On the other hand locals are living off their land with very little income.  One of the reasons of such disparity is that there is a big mining boom as we speak where multinationals are extracting valuable minerals and have brought local prices up as mining is very resource-intensive. PNG is another one of those countries which has great of potential but it is still far away from hitting its peak.  It has heirloom varieties and great altitude, but its social and economic problems makes it extremely hard to achieve top-quality coffee.  We are happy, nonetheless, with the quality we are seeing this year and cleanliness in the cup is one of the biggest attributes for these.  As always, we will push the bar for better quality! -Piero Cristiani
Papua New Guinea A/X Kunjin - Western Highlands (GrainPro) 6133 60kg 190 All Jays Enterprises afloat Citric with honey nut and toffee. Citric with honey nut and toffee. PNG is an extremely diverse country with over 800 different languages spoken.  Most of the tribes from the highlands had contact with white men not until the 1930s as exploration in PNG had been minimal.  PNG is now a paradox between Western influence and indigenous traditions. Commercial coffee production started in Papua New Guinea in the 1920s with seeds brought from Jamaica’s Blue Mountain, a Typica known as Jamaica Blue Mountain.  At that time most of the coffee production came from 18 large plantations.  Plantations still exist in PNG but it only accounts for 15% of the total production; most of the production now comes from small-holders who tend to their coffee gardens, as they call them locally.  The small-holders are subsistence farmers (meaning they live of their land) and they also grow coffee--there are no coffee farmers per-se.  Each garden might have anywhere from a couple to a couple hundred trees of coffee and parchment deliveries can range from 25 - 65 kg. Kunjin comes from small-holders between 1400 - 1800 masl from the Waghi Valley in Western Highlands in close proximity to the town of Mt Hagen.  Coffee is being processed this year (2013) in a leased vintage John Gordon brand wet-mill.  The hopes is that the mill where the coffee will be processed next year will be owned and operated by our partners on the ground with brand new Pinhalense machinery.  This should allow us to have access to better quality the coming years. Personally, I’m really excited to work with PNG as a coffee producing country being culturally and socially as foreign as it gets.  During my first visit in 2012 my luggage was left in Jakarta and I wouldn’t get it back until my way out of PNG.  I took a cab to Vision City Mega Mall, in the capital city of Port Moresby, and bought a Quicksilver t-shirt for $50USD and there weren’t many options.  The Highlander Hotel in Mt Hagen will run you $300USD per night with cockroaches in your room and you might get the suite over the kitchen--good luck sleeping!  On the other hand locals are living off their land with very little income.  One of the reasons of such disparity is that there is a big mining boom as we speak where multinationals are extracting valuable minerals and have brought local prices up as mining is very resource-intensive. PNG is another one of those countries which has great of potential but it is still far away from hitting its peak.  It has heirloom varieties and great altitude, but its social and economic problems makes it extremely hard to achieve top-quality coffee.  We are happy, nonetheless, with the quality we are seeing this year and cleanliness in the cup is one of the biggest attributes for these.  As always, we will push the bar for better quality! -Piero Cristiani
Papua New Guinea
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A/X Kunjin - Western Highlands (GrainPro) 6133 60kg 11 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric with honey nut and toffee. Citric with honey nut and toffee. PNG is an extremely diverse country with over 800 different languages spoken.  Most of the tribes from the highlands had contact with white men not until the 1930s as exploration in PNG had been minimal.  PNG is now a paradox between Western influence and indigenous traditions. Commercial coffee production started in Papua New Guinea in the 1920s with seeds brought from Jamaica’s Blue Mountain, a Typica known as Jamaica Blue Mountain.  At that time most of the coffee production came from 18 large plantations.  Plantations still exist in PNG but it only accounts for 15% of the total production; most of the production now comes from small-holders who tend to their coffee gardens, as they call them locally.  The small-holders are subsistence farmers (meaning they live of their land) and they also grow coffee--there are no coffee farmers per-se.  Each garden might have anywhere from a couple to a couple hundred trees of coffee and parchment deliveries can range from 25 - 65 kg. Kunjin comes from small-holders between 1400 - 1800 masl from the Waghi Valley in Western Highlands in close proximity to the town of Mt Hagen.  Coffee is being processed this year (2013) in a leased vintage John Gordon brand wet-mill.  The hopes is that the mill where the coffee will be processed next year will be owned and operated by our partners on the ground with brand new Pinhalense machinery.  This should allow us to have access to better quality the coming years. Personally, I’m really excited to work with PNG as a coffee producing country being culturally and socially as foreign as it gets.  During my first visit in 2012 my luggage was left in Jakarta and I wouldn’t get it back until my way out of PNG.  I took a cab to Vision City Mega Mall, in the capital city of Port Moresby, and bought a Quicksilver t-shirt for $50USD and there weren’t many options.  The Highlander Hotel in Mt Hagen will run you $300USD per night with cockroaches in your room and you might get the suite over the kitchen--good luck sleeping!  On the other hand locals are living off their land with very little income.  One of the reasons of such disparity is that there is a big mining boom as we speak where multinationals are extracting valuable minerals and have brought local prices up as mining is very resource-intensive. PNG is another one of those countries which has great of potential but it is still far away from hitting its peak.  It has heirloom varieties and great altitude, but its social and economic problems makes it extremely hard to achieve top-quality coffee.  We are happy, nonetheless, with the quality we are seeing this year and cleanliness in the cup is one of the biggest attributes for these.  As always, we will push the bar for better quality! -Piero Cristiani
Papua New Guinea A/X Ulya (GrainPro) 7378 60kg 320 OPEN origin The Ulya plantation is located next Ulya Mill in the hear of Waghi Valley. The high altitude and cooler climate in Ulya is ideal for the cultivation of quality coffee. The plantation supplies high quality cherries to be procees at the mill. The milll has recently expanded its milling capacity, including a new wet-milling line, and waste water processing plant. Ulya Mill also processes cherry from the surrounding coffee blocks of the Ulya Plantation. The beans have similar characteristics tothe Ulya Plantation coffee. The coffee from this area is sold as a high end plantation style under the banner Ulya AX. With certified Chain of Custody processed in place for the mill, Monpi guarantees traceability and quality of its Ulya beans.
Papua New Guinea A/X Kunjin (GrainPro) 7380 60kg 320 OPEN origin PNG is an extremely diverse country with over 800 different languages spoken.  Most of the tribes from the highlands had contact with white men not until the 1930s as exploration in PNG had been minimal.  PNG is now a paradox between Western influence and indigenous traditions. Commercial coffee production started in Papua New Guinea in the 1920s with seeds brought from Jamaica’s Blue Mountain, a Typica known as Jamaica Blue Mountain.  At that time most of the coffee production came from 18 large plantations.  Plantations still exist in PNG but it only accounts for 15% of the total production; most of the production now comes from small-holders who tend to their coffee gardens, as they call them locally.  The small-holders are subsistence farmers (meaning they live of their land) and they also grow coffee--there are no coffee farmers per-se.  Each garden might have anywhere from a couple to a couple hundred trees of coffee and parchment deliveries can range from 25 - 65 kg. Kunjin comes from small-holders between 1400 - 1800 masl from the Waghi Valley in Western Highlands in close proximity to the town of Mt Hagen.  Coffee is being processed this year (2013) in a leased vintage John Gordon brand wet-mill.  The hopes is that the mill where the coffee will be processed next year will be owned and operated by our partners on the ground with brand new Pinhalense machinery.  This should allow us to have access to better quality the coming years. Personally, I’m really excited to work with PNG as a coffee producing country being culturally and socially as foreign as it gets.  During my first visit in 2012 my luggage was left in Jakarta and I wouldn’t get it back until my way out of PNG.  I took a cab to Vision City Mega Mall, in the capital city of Port Moresby, and bought a Quicksilver t-shirt for $50USD and there weren’t many options.  The Highlander Hotel in Mt Hagen will run you $300USD per night with cockroaches in your room and you might get the suite over the kitchen--good luck sleeping!  On the other hand locals are living off their land with very little income.  One of the reasons of such disparity is that there is a big mining boom as we speak where multinationals are extracting valuable minerals and have brought local prices up as mining is very resource-intensive. PNG is another one of those countries which has great of potential but it is still far away from hitting its peak.  It has heirloom varieties and great altitude, but its social and economic problems makes it extremely hard to achieve top-quality coffee.  We are happy, nonetheless, with the quality we are seeing this year and cleanliness in the cup is one of the biggest attributes for these.  As always, we will push the bar for better quality! -Piero Cristiani
Papua New Guinea A/X Ulya (GrainPro) 7382 60kg 320 OPEN origin The Ulya plantation is located next Ulya Mill in the hear of Waghi Valley. The high altitude and cooler climate in Ulya is ideal for the cultivation of quality coffee. The plantation supplies high quality cherries to be procees at the mill. The milll has recently expanded its milling capacity, including a new wet-milling line, and waste water processing plant. Ulya Mill also processes cherry from the surrounding coffee blocks of the Ulya Plantation. The beans have similar characteristics tothe Ulya Plantation coffee. The coffee from this area is sold as a high end plantation style under the banner Ulya AX. With certified Chain of Custody processed in place for the mill, Monpi guarantees traceability and quality of its Ulya beans.
Papua New Guinea A/X Kunjin (GrainPro) 7384 60kg 320 OPEN origin PNG is an extremely diverse country with over 800 different languages spoken.  Most of the tribes from the highlands had contact with white men not until the 1930s as exploration in PNG had been minimal.  PNG is now a paradox between Western influence and indigenous traditions. Commercial coffee production started in Papua New Guinea in the 1920s with seeds brought from Jamaica’s Blue Mountain, a Typica known as Jamaica Blue Mountain.  At that time most of the coffee production came from 18 large plantations.  Plantations still exist in PNG but it only accounts for 15% of the total production; most of the production now comes from small-holders who tend to their coffee gardens, as they call them locally.  The small-holders are subsistence farmers (meaning they live of their land) and they also grow coffee--there are no coffee farmers per-se.  Each garden might have anywhere from a couple to a couple hundred trees of coffee and parchment deliveries can range from 25 - 65 kg. Kunjin comes from small-holders between 1400 - 1800 masl from the Waghi Valley in Western Highlands in close proximity to the town of Mt Hagen.  Coffee is being processed this year (2013) in a leased vintage John Gordon brand wet-mill.  The hopes is that the mill where the coffee will be processed next year will be owned and operated by our partners on the ground with brand new Pinhalense machinery.  This should allow us to have access to better quality the coming years. Personally, I’m really excited to work with PNG as a coffee producing country being culturally and socially as foreign as it gets.  During my first visit in 2012 my luggage was left in Jakarta and I wouldn’t get it back until my way out of PNG.  I took a cab to Vision City Mega Mall, in the capital city of Port Moresby, and bought a Quicksilver t-shirt for $50USD and there weren’t many options.  The Highlander Hotel in Mt Hagen will run you $300USD per night with cockroaches in your room and you might get the suite over the kitchen--good luck sleeping!  On the other hand locals are living off their land with very little income.  One of the reasons of such disparity is that there is a big mining boom as we speak where multinationals are extracting valuable minerals and have brought local prices up as mining is very resource-intensive. PNG is another one of those countries which has great of potential but it is still far away from hitting its peak.  It has heirloom varieties and great altitude, but its social and economic problems makes it extremely hard to achieve top-quality coffee.  We are happy, nonetheless, with the quality we are seeing this year and cleanliness in the cup is one of the biggest attributes for these.  As always, we will push the bar for better quality! -Piero Cristiani
Papua New Guinea
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FTO A/X Fair Trade Organic Purosa FLO 3120 (PC) 6064 60kg 64 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Cedar flavors with a heavy mouthfeel. Cedar flavors with a heavy mouthfeel. Purosa region in located a the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. The area is characterized of having rich volcanic soils and plentiful rain allowing the production of quality arabica coffee.
Papua New Guinea FTO A/X Fair Trade Organic Keto Tpasi - FLO ID 19926 (GrainPro) 7027 60kg 100 All Jays Enterprises afloat Citric, floral and herbal.
Papua New Guinea
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Spl Cat 100 A/X - Kunjin - Western Highlands (GrainPro) 6131 60kg 298 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us lemon and cedar. lemon and cedar. PNG is an extremely diverse country with over 800 different languages spoken.  Most of the tribes from the highlands had contact with white men not until the 1930s as exploration in PNG had been minimal.  PNG is now a paradox between Western influence and indigenous traditions. Commercial coffee production started in Papua New Guinea in the 1920s with seeds brought from Jamaica’s Blue Mountain, a Typica known as Jamaica Blue Mountain.  At that time most of the coffee production came from 18 large plantations.  Plantations still exist in PNG but it only accounts for 15% of the total production; most of the production now comes from small-holders who tend to their coffee gardens, as they call them locally.  The small-holders are subsistence farmers (meaning they live of their land) and they also grow coffee--there are no coffee farmers per-se.  Each garden might have anywhere from a couple to a couple hundred trees of coffee and parchment deliveries can range from 25 - 65 kg. Kunjin comes from small-holders between 1400 - 1800 masl from the Waghi Valley in Western Highlands in close proximity to the town of Mt Hagen.  Coffee is being processed this year (2013) in a leased vintage John Gordon brand wet-mill.  The hopes is that the mill where the coffee will be processed next year will be owned and operated by our partners on the ground with brand new Pinhalense machinery.  This should allow us to have access to better quality the coming years. Personally, I’m really excited to work with PNG as a coffee producing country being culturally and socially as foreign as it gets.  During my first visit in 2012 my luggage was left in Jakarta and I wouldn’t get it back until my way out of PNG.  I took a cab to Vision City Mega Mall, in the capital city of Port Moresby, and bought a Quicksilver t-shirt for $50USD and there weren’t many options.  The Highlander Hotel in Mt Hagen will run you $300USD per night with cockroaches in your room and you might get the suite over the kitchen--good luck sleeping!  On the other hand locals are living off their land with very little income.  One of the reasons of such disparity is that there is a big mining boom as we speak where multinationals are extracting valuable minerals and have brought local prices up as mining is very resource-intensive. PNG is another one of those countries which has great of potential but it is still far away from hitting its peak.  It has heirloom varieties and great altitude, but its social and economic problems makes it extremely hard to achieve top-quality coffee.  We are happy, nonetheless, with the quality we are seeing this year and cleanliness in the cup is one of the biggest attributes for these.  As always, we will push the bar for better quality! -Piero Cristiani
Papua New Guinea X Namugo (GrainPro) 7381 60kg 320 OPEN origin PNG is an extremely diverse country with over 800 different languages spoken. Most of the tribes from the highlands had contact with white men not until the 1930s as exploration in PNG had been minimal. PNG is now a paradox between Western influence and indigenous traditions. Commercial coffee production started in Papua New Guinea in the 1920s with seeds brought from Jamaica’s Blue Mountain, a Typica known as Jamacica Blue Mountain. At that time most of the coffee production came from 18 large plantations. Plantations still exist in PNG but it only accounts for 15% of the total production; most of the production now comes from small-holders who tend to their coffee gardens, as they call them locally. The small-holders are subsistence farmers (meaning they live of their land) and they also grow coffee--there are no coffee farmers per-se. Each garden might have anywhere from a couple to a couple hundred trees of coffee and parchment deliveries can range from 25 - 65 kg. Namugo region Namugo is the local name in the Okapa dialect for the rainforest. Namugo is dominated by hills and mountains, diverse micro climates that allow the production of quality coffee. The rainforest offers all environment characteristics that coffee need to develop well during the growth stage. Only red cherries are harvest and delicately processed to get the best quality. Parchment coffee is stored in well ventilated warehouses before sold.
Peru
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Cajamarca 1 Jaen (GrainPro) 7045 69kg 3 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Floral with intense citric and tartaric acidity and a crisp aftertaste. Floral with intense citric and tartaric acidity and a crisp aftertaste. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. The past couple of years we have had a taste of what Peru can offer, and this year we have brought it to a much bigger scale. We sourced producer lots and regional lots from the Northern region of Cajamarca. The potential in Peru is huge, there is a vast amount of coffee between 1600 and 1800 meters--these are extremely good conditions for the 88+ cups we are after. Many have kept traditional varieties such as: Caturra, Bourbon, Pache, and Typica which yield the best cups. With the rust epidemic this is a risky situation if coffee is not given proper nutrition and renovatedappropriately, something which is practiced in this Northern Region. The South (Cusco and Puno), on the other hand, wasdevastatedby rust. We will continue to push the bar to find these rare coffees in Peru and other origins. We are very excited to be part of the discovery of these jewels in new territory. This is possible through the hard work of all involved in the chain: producers, cupper, exporter, and importer. -Piero Cristian
Peru
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Cajamarca 1 Jaen (GrainPro) 7045 69kg 14 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Floral with intense citric and tartaric acidity and a crisp aftertaste. Floral with intense citric and tartaric acidity and a crisp aftertaste. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. The past couple of years we have had a taste of what Peru can offer, and this year we have brought it to a much bigger scale. We sourced producer lots and regional lots from the Northern region of Cajamarca. The potential in Peru is huge, there is a vast amount of coffee between 1600 and 1800 meters--these are extremely good conditions for the 88+ cups we are after. Many have kept traditional varieties such as: Caturra, Bourbon, Pache, and Typica which yield the best cups. With the rust epidemic this is a risky situation if coffee is not given proper nutrition and renovatedappropriately, something which is practiced in this Northern Region. The South (Cusco and Puno), on the other hand, wasdevastatedby rust. We will continue to push the bar to find these rare coffees in Peru and other origins. We are very excited to be part of the discovery of these jewels in new territory. This is possible through the hard work of all involved in the chain: producers, cupper, exporter, and importer. -Piero Cristian
Peru
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Cajamarca 2 Elmer Pena - San Ignacio (GrainPro) 7050 69kg 5 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Juicy tartaric acidity with a clean floral aftertaste. Juicy tartaric acidity with a clean floral aftertaste. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. Peru is a country which has great potential but for particular reasons it is extremely hard to find 87+ coffee landed in consuming countries. The potential is there: the country is the 8th largest producer of coffee in the world, has plenty of farms at and above 1600 and 1800 meters, and has predominantly Typica and Bourbon varieties; all of these conditions should give us, in theory, 88 - 90+ coffee. But this is not the case, high-end coffee out of Peru is very scarce due to the challenges they face. Most farmers own a couple of hectares only and are in remote areas. Many times their farms are 4 hours by foot from the nearest town and the town could be 8 hours by truck from the nearest port. This means coffee can sit at the farm unnecessarily for extended periods of time after it is dried. During the drying season climate conditions tend to be very humid with precipitation. Without proper storage, such as GrainPro, coffee will gain moisture and destabilize cup-quality.
Peru
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Cajamarca 3 San Ignacio (GrainPro) 7052 69kg 1 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Caramel pecan with a mild savory aftertaste and heavy mouthfeel. Caramel pecan with a mild savory aftertaste and heavy mouthfeel. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. Peru is a country which has great potential but for particular reasons it is extremely hard to find 87+ coffee landed in consuming countries. The potential is there: the country is the 8th largest producer of coffee in the world, has plenty of farms at and above 1600 and 1800 meters, and has predominantly Typica and Bourbon varieties; all of these conditions should give us, in theory, 88 - 90+ coffee. But this is not the case, high-end coffee out of Peru is very scarce due to the challenges they face. Most farmers own a couple of hectares only and are in remote areas. Many times their farms are 4 hours by foot from the nearest town and the town could be 8 hours by truck from the nearest port. This means coffee can sit at the farm unnecessarily for extended periods of time after it is dried. During the drying season climate conditions tend to be very humid with precipitation. Without proper storage, such as GrainPro, coffee will gain moisture and destabilize cup-quality. CENFROCAFE is one of the strongest cooperatives in Peru, both in terms of volume and quality. They have programs in place to increase production through organic fertilization also keeping plants healthy which is extremely helpful during coffee leaf rust outbreaks. CENFROCAFE produces about 120,000 quintales (1 quintal = 100 lbs) of coffee per year being one of the leading cooperatives in the country in volume. The average production per hectare is about 22 quintales which is high for organic production around the world. CENFRO recommends its producers to fertilize with Guano de Isla, phosphore ore, and Ulexite to achieve these yields. In terms of quality, CENFROCAFE is one of the top exporters in Peru as well. They have placed in the top places in national competitions having a big potential for microlots and excellent delivery and consistent full containers. Beginning in 2013 we began offering microlots to complement the APU full containers. Prior to the 2013 harvest I had cupped delicious 90+ coffees from Southern Ecuador but nothing above 86+ from Northern Peru and the coffee growing regions are right next to each other with extremely similar conditions. CENFRO's producers have heirloom Typica and Bourbon varieties with altitudes of 1600+ and 1800+. We are extremely happy with the quality of the microlots we bought last year and will continue to expand this volume as the harvests keep coming in. -Piero Cristiani Clickhereto see additional photos of Peru and its coffee growing regions.
Peru
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Decaf FTO MWP Fair Trade Organic Decaf Origin Select - FLO ID 3437 6390 69kg 57 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Lemon and some sugar.
Peru FTO Norte Fair Trade Organic APU, CENFROCAFE, FLO ID 4395 (GrainPro) 6143 69kg 275 All Jays Enterprises afloat Creamy dark chocolate, lime and clove flavors with a mild nutty aftertaste. Creamy dark chocolate, lime and clove flavors with a mild nutty aftertaste. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. Peru is a country which has great potential but for particular reasons it is extremely hard to find 87+ coffee landed in consuming countries. The potential is there: the country is the 8th largest producer of coffee in the world, has plenty of farms at and above 1600 and 1800 meters, and has predominantly Typica and Bourbon varieties; all of these conditions should give us, in theory, 88 - 90+ coffee. But this is not the case, high-end coffee out of Peru is very scarce due to the challenges they face. Most farmers own a couple of hectares only and are in remote areas. Many times their farms are 4 hours by foot from the nearest town and the town could be 8 hours by truck from the nearest port. This means coffee can sit at the farm unnecessarily for extended periods of time after it is dried. During the drying season climate conditions tend to be very humid with precipitation. Without proper storage, such as GrainPro, coffee will gain moisture and destabilize cup-quality. CENFROCAFE is one of the strongest cooperatives in Peru, both in terms of volume and quality. They have programs in place to increase production through organic fertilization also keeping plants healthy which is extremely helpful during coffee leaf rust outbreaks. CENFROCAFE produces about 120,000 quintales (1 quintal = 100 lbs) of coffee per year being one of the leading cooperatives in the country in volume. The average production per hectare is about 22 quintales which is high for organic production around the world. CENFRO recommends its producers to fertilize with Guano de Isla, phosphore ore, and Ulexite to achieve these yields. In terms of quality, CENFROCAFE is one of the top exporters in Peru as well. They have placed in the top places in national competitions having a big potential for microlots and excellent delivery and consistent full containers. Beginning in 2013 we began offering microlots to complement the APU full containers. Prior to the 2013 harvest I had cupped delicious 90+ coffees from Southern Ecuador but nothing above 86+ from Northern Peru and the coffee growing regions are right next to each other with extremely similar conditions. CENFRO's producers have heirloom Typica and Bourbon varieties with altitudes of 1600+ and 1800+. We are extremely happy with the quality of the microlots we bought last year and will continue to expand this volume as the harvests keep coming in. -Piero Cristiani Clickhereto see additional photos of Peru and its coffee growing regions.
Peru
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FTO Norte Fair Trade Organic APU, CENFROCAFE, FLO ID 4395 (GrainPro) 6144 69kg 223 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Heavy with toffee. Heavy with toffee. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. Peru is a country which has great potential but for particular reasons it is extremely hard to find 87+ coffee landed in consuming countries. The potential is there: the country is the 8th largest producer of coffee in the world, has plenty of farms at and above 1600 and 1800 meters, and has predominantly Typica and Bourbon varieties; all of these conditions should give us, in theory, 88 - 90+ coffee. But this is not the case, high-end coffee out of Peru is very scarce due to the challenges they face. Most farmers own a couple of hectares only and are in remote areas. Many times their farms are 4 hours by foot from the nearest town and the town could be 8 hours by truck from the nearest port. This means coffee can sit at the farm unnecessarily for extended periods of time after it is dried. During the drying season climate conditions tend to be very humid with precipitation. Without proper storage, such as GrainPro, coffee will gain moisture and destabilize cup-quality. CENFROCAFE is one of the strongest cooperatives in Peru, both in terms of volume and quality. They have programs in place to increase production through organic fertilization also keeping plants healthy which is extremely helpful during coffee leaf rust outbreaks. CENFROCAFE produces about 120,000 quintales (1 quintal = 100 lbs) of coffee per year being one of the leading cooperatives in the country in volume. The average production per hectare is about 22 quintales which is high for organic production around the world. CENFRO recommends its producers to fertilize with Guano de Isla, phosphore ore, and Ulexite to achieve these yields. In terms of quality, CENFROCAFE is one of the top exporters in Peru as well. They have placed in the top places in national competitions having a big potential for microlots and excellent delivery and consistent full containers. Beginning in 2013 we began offering microlots to complement the APU full containers. Prior to the 2013 harvest I had cupped delicious 90+ coffees from Southern Ecuador but nothing above 86+ from Northern Peru and the coffee growing regions are right next to each other with extremely similar conditions. CENFRO's producers have heirloom Typica and Bourbon varieties with altitudes of 1600+ and 1800+. We are extremely happy with the quality of the microlots we bought last year and will continue to expand this volume as the harvests keep coming in. -Piero Cristiani Clickhereto see additional photos of Peru and its coffee growing regions.
Peru
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FTO Norte Fair Trade Organic APU, CENFROCAFE, FLO ID 4395 (GrainPro) 6145 69kg 20 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Creamy with chocolate, lemon and savory tones. Creamy with chocolate, lemon and savory tones. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. Peru is a country which has great potential but for particular reasons it is extremely hard to find 87+ coffee landed in consuming countries. The potential is there: the country is the 8th largest producer of coffee in the world, has plenty of farms at and above 1600 and 1800 meters, and has predominantly Typica and Bourbon varieties; all of these conditions should give us, in theory, 88 - 90+ coffee. But this is not the case, high-end coffee out of Peru is very scarce due to the challenges they face. Most farmers own a couple of hectares only and are in remote areas. Many times their farms are 4 hours by foot from the nearest town and the town could be 8 hours by truck from the nearest port. This means coffee can sit at the farm unnecessarily for extended periods of time after it is dried. During the drying season climate conditions tend to be very humid with precipitation. Without proper storage, such as GrainPro, coffee will gain moisture and destabilize cup-quality. CENFROCAFE is one of the strongest cooperatives in Peru, both in terms of volume and quality. They have programs in place to increase production through organic fertilization also keeping plants healthy which is extremely helpful during coffee leaf rust outbreaks. CENFROCAFE produces about 120,000 quintales (1 quintal = 100 lbs) of coffee per year being one of the leading cooperatives in the country in volume. The average production per hectare is about 22 quintales which is high for organic production around the world. CENFRO recommends its producers to fertilize with Guano de Isla, phosphore ore, and Ulexite to achieve these yields. In terms of quality, CENFROCAFE is one of the top exporters in Peru as well. They have placed in the top places in national competitions having a big potential for microlots and excellent delivery and consistent full containers. Beginning in 2013 we began offering microlots to complement the APU full containers. Prior to the 2013 harvest I had cupped delicious 90+ coffees from Southern Ecuador but nothing above 86+ from Northern Peru and the coffee growing regions are right next to each other with extremely similar conditions. CENFRO's producers have heirloom Typica and Bourbon varieties with altitudes of 1600+ and 1800+. We are extremely happy with the quality of the microlots we bought last year and will continue to expand this volume as the harvests keep coming in. -Piero Cristiani Clickhereto see additional photos of Peru and its coffee growing regions.
Peru
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FTO Norte Fair Trade Organic APU, CENFROCAFE, FLO ID 4395 (GrainPro) 6148 69kg 139 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Savory chocolate and cacao flavors with citric acidity and a mild herbal aftertaste. Savory chocolate and cacao flavors with citric acidity and a mild herbal aftertaste. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. Peru is a country which has great potential but for particular reasons it is extremely hard to find 87+ coffee landed in consuming countries. The potential is there: the country is the 8th largest producer of coffee in the world, has plenty of farms at and above 1600 and 1800 meters, and has predominantly Typica and Bourbon varieties; all of these conditions should give us, in theory, 88 - 90+ coffee. But this is not the case, high-end coffee out of Peru is very scarce due to the challenges they face. Most farmers own a couple of hectares only and are in remote areas. Many times their farms are 4 hours by foot from the nearest town and the town could be 8 hours by truck from the nearest port. This means coffee can sit at the farm unnecessarily for extended periods of time after it is dried. During the drying season climate conditions tend to be very humid with precipitation. Without proper storage, such as GrainPro, coffee will gain moisture and destabilize cup-quality. CENFROCAFE is one of the strongest cooperatives in Peru, both in terms of volume and quality. They have programs in place to increase production through organic fertilization also keeping plants healthy which is extremely helpful during coffee leaf rust outbreaks. CENFROCAFE produces about 120,000 quintales (1 quintal = 100 lbs) of coffee per year being one of the leading cooperatives in the country in volume. The average production per hectare is about 22 quintales which is high for organic production around the world. CENFRO recommends its producers to fertilize with Guano de Isla, phosphore ore, and Ulexite to achieve these yields. In terms of quality, CENFROCAFE is one of the top exporters in Peru as well. They have placed in the top places in national competitions having a big potential for microlots and excellent delivery and consistent full containers. Beginning in 2013 we began offering microlots to complement the APU full containers. Prior to the 2013 harvest I had cupped delicious 90+ coffees from Southern Ecuador but nothing above 86+ from Northern Peru and the coffee growing regions are right next to each other with extremely similar conditions. CENFRO's producers have heirloom Typica and Bourbon varieties with altitudes of 1600+ and 1800+. We are extremely happy with the quality of the microlots we bought last year and will continue to expand this volume as the harvests keep coming in. -Piero Cristiani Clickhereto see additional photos of Peru and its coffee growing regions.
Peru
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FTO Norte Fair Trade Organic APU, CENFROCAFE, FLO ID 4395 (GrainPro) 6323 69kg 12 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Sweet and clean with toffee and peanut brittle flavors and tangy lemon acidity. Sweet and clean with toffee and peanut brittle flavors and tangy lemon acidity. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. Peru is a country which has great potential but for particular reasons it is extremely hard to find 87+ coffee landed in consuming countries. The potential is there: the country is the 8th largest producer of coffee in the world, has plenty of farms at and above 1600 and 1800 meters, and has predominantly Typica and Bourbon varieties; all of these conditions should give us, in theory, 88 - 90+ coffee. But this is not the case, high-end coffee out of Peru is very scarce due to the challenges they face. Most farmers own a couple of hectares only and are in remote areas. Many times their farms are 4 hours by foot from the nearest town and the town could be 8 hours by truck from the nearest port. This means coffee can sit at the farm unnecessarily for extended periods of time after it is dried. During the drying season climate conditions tend to be very humid with precipitation. Without proper storage, such as GrainPro, coffee will gain moisture and destabilize cup-quality. CENFROCAFE is one of the strongest cooperatives in Peru, both in terms of volume and quality. They have programs in place to increase production through organic fertilization also keeping plants healthy which is extremely helpful during coffee leaf rust outbreaks. CENFROCAFE produces about 120,000 quintales (1 quintal = 100 lbs) of coffee per year being one of the leading cooperatives in the country in volume. The average production per hectare is about 22 quintales which is high for organic production around the world. CENFRO recommends its producers to fertilize with Guano de Isla, phosphore ore, and Ulexite to achieve these yields. In terms of quality, CENFROCAFE is one of the top exporters in Peru as well. They have placed in the top places in national competitions having a big potential for microlots and excellent delivery and consistent full containers. Beginning in 2013 we began offering microlots to complement the APU full containers. Prior to the 2013 harvest I had cupped delicious 90+ coffees from Southern Ecuador but nothing above 86+ from Northern Peru and the coffee growing regions are right next to each other with extremely similar conditions. CENFRO's producers have heirloom Typica and Bourbon varieties with altitudes of 1600+ and 1800+. We are extremely happy with the quality of the microlots we bought last year and will continue to expand this volume as the harvests keep coming in. -Piero Cristiani Clickhereto see additional photos of Peru and its coffee growing regions.
Peru
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FTO Norte Fair Trade Organic APU, CENFROCAFE, FLO ID 4395 (GrainPro) 6324 69kg 80 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Praline, lime, raisin and toffee. Praline, lime, raisin and toffee. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. Peru is a country which has great potential but for particular reasons it is extremely hard to find 87+ coffee landed in consuming countries. The potential is there: the country is the 8th largest producer of coffee in the world, has plenty of farms at and above 1600 and 1800 meters, and has predominantly Typica and Bourbon varieties; all of these conditions should give us, in theory, 88 - 90+ coffee. But this is not the case, high-end coffee out of Peru is very scarce due to the challenges they face. Most farmers own a couple of hectares only and are in remote areas. Many times their farms are 4 hours by foot from the nearest town and the town could be 8 hours by truck from the nearest port. This means coffee can sit at the farm unnecessarily for extended periods of time after it is dried. During the drying season climate conditions tend to be very humid with precipitation. Without proper storage, such as GrainPro, coffee will gain moisture and destabilize cup-quality. CENFROCAFE is one of the strongest cooperatives in Peru, both in terms of volume and quality. They have programs in place to increase production through organic fertilization also keeping plants healthy which is extremely helpful during coffee leaf rust outbreaks. CENFROCAFE produces about 120,000 quintales (1 quintal = 100 lbs) of coffee per year being one of the leading cooperatives in the country in volume. The average production per hectare is about 22 quintales which is high for organic production around the world. CENFRO recommends its producers to fertilize with Guano de Isla, phosphore ore, and Ulexite to achieve these yields. In terms of quality, CENFROCAFE is one of the top exporters in Peru as well. They have placed in the top places in national competitions having a big potential for microlots and excellent delivery and consistent full containers. Beginning in 2013 we began offering microlots to complement the APU full containers. Prior to the 2013 harvest I had cupped delicious 90+ coffees from Southern Ecuador but nothing above 86+ from Northern Peru and the coffee growing regions are right next to each other with extremely similar conditions. CENFRO's producers have heirloom Typica and Bourbon varieties with altitudes of 1600+ and 1800+. We are extremely happy with the quality of the microlots we bought last year and will continue to expand this volume as the harvests keep coming in. -Piero Cristiani Clickhereto see additional photos of Peru and its coffee growing regions.
Peru
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FTO Norte Fair Trade Organic APU, CENFROCAFE, FLO ID 4395 (GrainPro) 6325 69kg 3 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric, chocolate and herbaceous. Citric, chocolate and herbaceous. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. Peru is a country which has great potential but for particular reasons it is extremely hard to find 87+ coffee landed in consuming countries. The potential is there: the country is the 8th largest producer of coffee in the world, has plenty of farms at and above 1600 and 1800 meters, and has predominantly Typica and Bourbon varieties; all of these conditions should give us, in theory, 88 - 90+ coffee. But this is not the case, high-end coffee out of Peru is very scarce due to the challenges they face. Most farmers own a couple of hectares only and are in remote areas. Many times their farms are 4 hours by foot from the nearest town and the town could be 8 hours by truck from the nearest port. This means coffee can sit at the farm unnecessarily for extended periods of time after it is dried. During the drying season climate conditions tend to be very humid with precipitation. Without proper storage, such as GrainPro, coffee will gain moisture and destabilize cup-quality. CENFROCAFE is one of the strongest cooperatives in Peru, both in terms of volume and quality. They have programs in place to increase production through organic fertilization also keeping plants healthy which is extremely helpful during coffee leaf rust outbreaks. CENFROCAFE produces about 120,000 quintales (1 quintal = 100 lbs) of coffee per year being one of the leading cooperatives in the country in volume. The average production per hectare is about 22 quintales which is high for organic production around the world. CENFRO recommends its producers to fertilize with Guano de Isla, phosphore ore, and Ulexite to achieve these yields. In terms of quality, CENFROCAFE is one of the top exporters in Peru as well. They have placed in the top places in national competitions having a big potential for microlots and excellent delivery and consistent full containers. Beginning in 2013 we began offering microlots to complement the APU full containers. Prior to the 2013 harvest I had cupped delicious 90+ coffees from Southern Ecuador but nothing above 86+ from Northern Peru and the coffee growing regions are right next to each other with extremely similar conditions. CENFRO's producers have heirloom Typica and Bourbon varieties with altitudes of 1600+ and 1800+. We are extremely happy with the quality of the microlots we bought last year and will continue to expand this volume as the harvests keep coming in. -Piero Cristiani Clickhereto see additional photos of Peru and its coffee growing regions.
Peru
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FTO Norte Fair Trade Organic APU, CENFROCAFE, FLO ID 4395 (GrainPro) 6326 69kg 29 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Sweet with crisp citric acidity, amaretto, lemon and savory aftertaste. Sweet with crisp citric acidity, amaretto, lemon and savory aftertaste. Coffee came to Peru in the mid 1700s and was most likely introduced by Dutch immigrants. The Dutch brought the Typica variety which still dominates especially amongst the older farms and micro-farms. The first coffee plantings were in Chinchao, Huanuco in Selva Central and disseminated from there to the Northern (Cajamarca) and Southern (Cusco and Puno) regions of the country. Peru had its first coffee shop in 1771 in Lima and started exporting coffee in 1887. Peru is a country which has great potential but for particular reasons it is extremely hard to find 87+ coffee landed in consuming countries. The potential is there: the country is the 8th largest producer of coffee in the world, has plenty of farms at and above 1600 and 1800 meters, and has predominantly Typica and Bourbon varieties; all of these conditions should give us, in theory, 88 - 90+ coffee. But this is not the case, high-end coffee out of Peru is very scarce due to the challenges they face. Most farmers own a couple of hectares only and are in remote areas. Many times their farms are 4 hours by foot from the nearest town and the town could be 8 hours by truck from the nearest port. This means coffee can sit at the farm unnecessarily for extended periods of time after it is dried. During the drying season climate conditions tend to be very humid with precipitation. Without proper storage, such as GrainPro, coffee will gain moisture and destabilize cup-quality. CENFROCAFE is one of the strongest cooperatives in Peru, both in terms of volume and quality. They have programs in place to increase production through organic fertilization also keeping plants healthy which is extremely helpful during coffee leaf rust outbreaks. CENFROCAFE produces about 120,000 quintales (1 quintal = 100 lbs) of coffee per year being one of the leading cooperatives in the country in volume. The average production per hectare is about 22 quintales which is high for organic production around the world. CENFRO recommends its producers to fertilize with Guano de Isla, phosphore ore, and Ulexite to achieve these yields. In terms of quality, CENFROCAFE is one of the top exporters in Peru as well. They have placed in the top places in national competitions having a big potential for microlots and excellent delivery and consistent full containers. Beginning in 2013 we began offering microlots to complement the APU full containers. Prior to the 2013 harvest I had cupped delicious 90+ coffees from Southern Ecuador but nothing above 86+ from Northern Peru and the coffee growing regions are right next to each other with extremely similar conditions. CENFRO's producers have heirloom Typica and Bourbon varieties with altitudes of 1600+ and 1800+. We are extremely happy with the quality of the microlots we bought last year and will continue to expand this volume as the harvests keep coming in. -Piero Cristiani Clickhereto see additional photos of Peru and its coffee growing regions.
Rwanda
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FT USA Organic Organic - Non Fair Trade COOPAC - Kabirizi washing station (GrainPro) 6567 60kg 266 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Lemon and sweet chocolate, buttermilk, toffee and a smooth mouthfeel. Lemon and sweet chocolate, buttermilk, toffee and a smooth mouthfeel. Lake Kivu is our favorite area in Rwanda. The climate of the lake and the volcanic soil come together in some magical way to make deep cherry fruit tones in these lovely coffees. An extra bonus for this specific coffee is that it is certified organic and ex-Ethiopia, there is very little certified African coffees. COOPAC is a fairtrade certified cooperative that began with 110 farmers in 2001 and today has over 2,200 members. COOPAC is committed to environmental and social sustainability in addition to producing high quality coffee. Waste by-products created during the coffee washing process are used to as fertilizer rather than discarded into the lake, and shade trees are distributed to farmers to prevent soil erosion. COOPAC has assisted in the construction of a school, health-care clinics, and roads and bridges in the community, and has a program to distribute cows and goats to the most productive farmers. COOPAC also provides farmers with an agricultural advisor to educate the growers about the latest production methods. -Jason
Rwanda FT USA Organic Organic - Non Fair Trade COOPAC - Kabirizi washing station (GrainPro) 6568 60kg 320 All Jays Enterprises afloat Heavy and sweet with herbaceous and savory fruit flavors; citric and tartaric acidity. Heavy and sweet with herbaceous and savory fruit flavors; citric and tartaric acidity. Lake Kivu is our favorite area in Rwanda. The climate of the lake and the volcanic soil come together in some magical way to make deep cherry fruit tones in these lovely coffees. An extra bonus for this specific coffee is that it is certified organic and ex-Ethiopia, there is very little certified African coffees. COOPAC is a fairtrade certified cooperative that began with 110 farmers in 2001 and today has over 2,200 members. COOPAC is committed to environmental and social sustainability in addition to producing high quality coffee. Waste by-products created during the coffee washing process are used to as fertilizer rather than discarded into the lake, and shade trees are distributed to farmers to prevent soil erosion. COOPAC has assisted in the construction of a school, health-care clinics, and roads and bridges in the community, and has a program to distribute cows and goats to the most productive farmers. COOPAC also provides farmers with an agricultural advisor to educate the growers about the latest production methods. -Jason
Rwanda
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FT USA Organic Organic - Non Fair Trade COOPAC - Kabirizi washing station (GrainPro) 6569 60kg 231 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Heavy and tartaric with caramel, tomato and cocoa flavors. Heavy and tartaric with caramel, tomato and cocoa flavors. Lake Kivu is our favorite area in Rwanda. The climate of the lake and the volcanic soil come together in some magical way to make deep cherry fruit tones in these lovely coffees. An extra bonus for this specific coffee is that it is certified organic and ex-Ethiopia, there is very little certified African coffees. COOPAC is a fairtrade certified cooperative that began with 110 farmers in 2001 and today has over 2,200 members. COOPAC is committed to environmental and social sustainability in addition to producing high quality coffee. Waste by-products created during the coffee washing process are used to as fertilizer rather than discarded into the lake, and shade trees are distributed to farmers to prevent soil erosion. COOPAC has assisted in the construction of a school, health-care clinics, and roads and bridges in the community, and has a program to distribute cows and goats to the most productive farmers. COOPAC also provides farmers with an agricultural advisor to educate the growers about the latest production methods. -Jason
Rwanda
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Washed Arabica 1 Organic COOPAC - Kigeyo washing station (GrainPro) 6565 60kg 48 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Bright and creamy with tropical fruit flavors as well as cola, floral, fig, lemon, brown sugar sweetness; sparkling phosphoric and tartaric acidity. Bright and creamy with tropical fruit flavors as well as cola, floral, fig, lemon, brown sugar sweetness; sparkling phosphoric and tartaric acidity. We've been buying for the last five years from Emmanuel, who is both President of Coopac Cooperative and Sacof. He works primarily in the Kivu/Western part of Rwanda, which has always been our favorite area. Here is a translated testimonial from one of the many many small producers that delivers into Kigeyo. It was translated directly from Kirwanda into English by a Kirwanda and French speaker, so not edited by us. "My name is Dusabemariya Helene, a widow with five children. I started coffee production with my late husband who inherited the plantation from his late uncle. It was difficutl for us to find buyers for our coffees and the coffee that we produced was not of good quality. It was not easy to plan our future especially after his death. Fortunately SACOF started business and began giving me enough organic fertilizer to enrich the soild in order to produce more coffee and get enough income. My children now go to school through the support of SACOF. Through the goats that I received from SACOF as a gift, the production of coffee has much improved and as result my life changed." The bulk of Rwandan coffee is sold as ordinary, which is unwashed and not a very clean natural. Premium prices like that paid for this coffee produce both superior cups and allow farmers to live and prosper in a manner that commodity coffee will and can not for the small farmer. for an additional look atvideo on Coopac Coffee watch this video. More info on Coopac from www.Coopac.com: "Coopac was established in April of 2001 with 1100 memebers aiming to regenerate the coffee sector in the Gisenyi region of Lake Kivu. The initial objectives was to take advantage of the excellent natural resources in our region and focus on producing the highest quality coffee for the gourmet market so as to gain higher returns for our collective efforts thereby increase the well being of all our members. COOPAC coffee Prices has been steadily climbing in recognition of the quality improvements in turn the well being of its members has drastically improved through FairTrade initiatives that guarantee the farmers get their fair share. COOPAC went on to cr.onstruct the Nyamwenda washing station in 2003 with partial grant, partial credit. Today, some 50 washing stations dot the northern lake landscape and CCOPAC has achieved FLO certification. The membership in 2004 had risen to 1,500 members. Currently that number stands at 2,198 members from the six areas of Ack, Ubuzima, Tuzamurane, Kopabm, Abakundakurima and Abanyamurava, and exported 12 containers of Fair Trade certified coffee. COOPAC is currently promoting and providing shade tree saplings and agroforestry education to all its members so as to adhere to strict organic practices with ongoing assistance provided to fair trade community based initiatives which has so far enabled in the construction of schools, health-care clinics, roads and bridges as well as local women and youth development programs."
Rwanda
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Washed Arabica 1 Organic COOPAC - Kigeyo washing station (GrainPro) 6565 60kg 2 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Bright and creamy with tropical fruit flavors as well as cola, floral, fig, lemon, brown sugar sweetness; sparkling phosphoric and tartaric acidity. Bright and creamy with tropical fruit flavors as well as cola, floral, fig, lemon, brown sugar sweetness; sparkling phosphoric and tartaric acidity. We've been buying for the last five years from Emmanuel, who is both President of Coopac Cooperative and Sacof. He works primarily in the Kivu/Western part of Rwanda, which has always been our favorite area. Here is a translated testimonial from one of the many many small producers that delivers into Kigeyo. It was translated directly from Kirwanda into English by a Kirwanda and French speaker, so not edited by us. "My name is Dusabemariya Helene, a widow with five children. I started coffee production with my late husband who inherited the plantation from his late uncle. It was difficutl for us to find buyers for our coffees and the coffee that we produced was not of good quality. It was not easy to plan our future especially after his death. Fortunately SACOF started business and began giving me enough organic fertilizer to enrich the soild in order to produce more coffee and get enough income. My children now go to school through the support of SACOF. Through the goats that I received from SACOF as a gift, the production of coffee has much improved and as result my life changed." The bulk of Rwandan coffee is sold as ordinary, which is unwashed and not a very clean natural. Premium prices like that paid for this coffee produce both superior cups and allow farmers to live and prosper in a manner that commodity coffee will and can not for the small farmer. for an additional look atvideo on Coopac Coffee watch this video. More info on Coopac from www.Coopac.com: "Coopac was established in April of 2001 with 1100 memebers aiming to regenerate the coffee sector in the Gisenyi region of Lake Kivu. The initial objectives was to take advantage of the excellent natural resources in our region and focus on producing the highest quality coffee for the gourmet market so as to gain higher returns for our collective efforts thereby increase the well being of all our members. COOPAC coffee Prices has been steadily climbing in recognition of the quality improvements in turn the well being of its members has drastically improved through FairTrade initiatives that guarantee the farmers get their fair share. COOPAC went on to cr.onstruct the Nyamwenda washing station in 2003 with partial grant, partial credit. Today, some 50 washing stations dot the northern lake landscape and CCOPAC has achieved FLO certification. The membership in 2004 had risen to 1,500 members. Currently that number stands at 2,198 members from the six areas of Ack, Ubuzima, Tuzamurane, Kopabm, Abakundakurima and Abanyamurava, and exported 12 containers of Fair Trade certified coffee. COOPAC is currently promoting and providing shade tree saplings and agroforestry education to all its members so as to adhere to strict organic practices with ongoing assistance provided to fair trade community based initiatives which has so far enabled in the construction of schools, health-care clinics, roads and bridges as well as local women and youth development programs."
Rwanda
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Washed Arabica 4 Organic Gishamwana Island (GrainPro) 6564 60kg 24 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Salted caramel, raisin and lime with citric and soft malic acidity. Salted caramel, raisin and lime with citric and soft malic acidity. Island coffee with altitude and environmental attitude! Gishawama Island has over thirty five thousand coffee trees planted with environmental harmony in mind. This farm is in transition to becoming certified organic and is currently farmed with organic farming practices amongst forestry that provides a level of shade much greater than typical African coffee. Also, by nature of Gishamwana's isolation from other coffee, many of the other natural coffee diseases and pests quite simply have not made the boat over.
Rwanda
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Washed Arabica 4 Organic Gishamwana Island (GrainPro) 6564 60kg 10 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Salted caramel, raisin and lime with citric and soft malic acidity. Salted caramel, raisin and lime with citric and soft malic acidity. Island coffee with altitude and environmental attitude! Gishawama Island has over thirty five thousand coffee trees planted with environmental harmony in mind. This farm is in transition to becoming certified organic and is currently farmed with organic farming practices amongst forestry that provides a level of shade much greater than typical African coffee. Also, by nature of Gishamwana's isolation from other coffee, many of the other natural coffee diseases and pests quite simply have not made the boat over.
Sulawesi
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Microlot PT TOARCO Tana Toraja - A (GrainPro) 6604 60kg 76 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Toffee, floral, lime and juicy sugar with intense citric acidity. Toffee, floral, lime and juicy sugar with intense citric acidity. For pictures click here Sulawesi (Celebes), was influenced and controlled by the Netherlands from 1605 until World War II. In 1669 the Dutch East India Company took control of the trade in Sulawesi. The Dutch built Fort Rotterdam in Ujung Pandang (now Makassar) in the mid 1600’s and not until 1905 they finally gained control of the whole island becoming part of the Dutch state colony of the Netherlands East Indies. The Dutch East India Company was in control of coffee production in Indonesia during most the 1700’s and introduced Arabica Coffee (Typica) to Sulawesi in 1750. It took some time to arrive to Tana Toraja, Sulawesi from Minneapolis. Minneapolis – Tokyo – Singapore – Jakarta – Makassar and drive 8 hours north to Rantepao, Tana Toraja. It is the most beautiful place on earth. It’s green, lush, rice paddies everywhere—giving it a sense of calmness. Traditional Tongkonan Houses cover the background with fascinating Toraja Patterns decorating the structures. Indonesian coffee has traditionally been processed with the Giling-Basah method, or wet-hulled like Sumatra. In 1976 TOARCO, a Japanese-Indonesian joint-venture, introduced to Sulawesi the traditional washed-process, similar to Central America. TOARCO owns Pedamaran Plantation at 900 – 1250 masl and purchases wet-parchment (at 40% moisture) from small producers at 1200 – 1800 masl. Coffee is trucked to Pedamaran Plantation immediately and coffee gets dried on patios at their mill facilities. If a producer wants to sell their parchment coffee to TOARCO they need to get certified to their standards as far as selective-picking, storage, transportation, moisture levels, etc. Farmers are issued ID cards that allow them to sell their coffee at various purchasing points in the Tana Toraja region during the market of the week. Café Imports’ coffee comes from small producers at the higher altitude areas. Most of the coffee produced in Tana Toraja is S795 variety, a Typica hybrid. This proves once again how important the variety translates in the cup. Indonesia has a great deal of Catimor, a Robusta-heavy x Arabica hybrid, but Tana Toraja has kept high-quality varieties. In 2010 Sulawesi received double the normal amount of rain reducing the crop of 2011 down 70% making it unavailable for that season. -Piero Cristiani
Sulawesi
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Microlot PT TOARCO Tana Toraja - A (GrainPro) 6607 60kg 80 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Toffee and caramel with tangy citric acidity, floral aromatics and an herbal aftertaste. Toffee and caramel with tangy citric acidity, floral aromatics and an herbal aftertaste. For pictures click here Sulawesi (Celebes), was influenced and controlled by the Netherlands from 1605 until World War II. In 1669 the Dutch East India Company took control of the trade in Sulawesi. The Dutch built Fort Rotterdam in Ujung Pandang (now Makassar) in the mid 1600’s and not until 1905 they finally gained control of the whole island becoming part of the Dutch state colony of the Netherlands East Indies. The Dutch East India Company was in control of coffee production in Indonesia during most the 1700’s and introduced Arabica Coffee (Typica) to Sulawesi in 1750. It took some time to arrive to Tana Toraja, Sulawesi from Minneapolis. Minneapolis – Tokyo – Singapore – Jakarta – Makassar and drive 8 hours north to Rantepao, Tana Toraja. It is the most beautiful place on earth. It’s green, lush, rice paddies everywhere—giving it a sense of calmness. Traditional Tongkonan Houses cover the background with fascinating Toraja Patterns decorating the structures. Indonesian coffee has traditionally been processed with the Giling-Basah method, or wet-hulled like Sumatra. In 1976 TOARCO, a Japanese-Indonesian joint-venture, introduced to Sulawesi the traditional washed-process, similar to Central America. TOARCO owns Pedamaran Plantation at 900 – 1250 masl and purchases wet-parchment (at 40% moisture) from small producers at 1200 – 1800 masl. Coffee is trucked to Pedamaran Plantation immediately and coffee gets dried on patios at their mill facilities. If a producer wants to sell their parchment coffee to TOARCO they need to get certified to their standards as far as selective-picking, storage, transportation, moisture levels, etc. Farmers are issued ID cards that allow them to sell their coffee at various purchasing points in the Tana Toraja region during the market of the week. Café Imports’ coffee comes from small producers at the higher altitude areas. Most of the coffee produced in Tana Toraja is S795 variety, a Typica hybrid. This proves once again how important the variety translates in the cup. Indonesia has a great deal of Catimor, a Robusta-heavy x Arabica hybrid, but Tana Toraja has kept high-quality varieties. In 2010 Sulawesi received double the normal amount of rain reducing the crop of 2011 down 70% making it unavailable for that season. -Piero Cristiani
Sulawesi
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Microlot PT TOARCO Tana Toraja - A (GrainPro) 6610 60kg 90 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Soft melon and sugar cane juice flavors with a syrupy mouthfeel. Soft melon and sugar cane juice flavors with a syrupy mouthfeel. For pictures click here Sulawesi (Celebes), was influenced and controlled by the Netherlands from 1605 until World War II. In 1669 the Dutch East India Company took control of the trade in Sulawesi. The Dutch built Fort Rotterdam in Ujung Pandang (now Makassar) in the mid 1600’s and not until 1905 they finally gained control of the whole island becoming part of the Dutch state colony of the Netherlands East Indies. The Dutch East India Company was in control of coffee production in Indonesia during most the 1700’s and introduced Arabica Coffee (Typica) to Sulawesi in 1750. It took some time to arrive to Tana Toraja, Sulawesi from Minneapolis. Minneapolis – Tokyo – Singapore – Jakarta – Makassar and drive 8 hours north to Rantepao, Tana Toraja. It is the most beautiful place on earth. It’s green, lush, rice paddies everywhere—giving it a sense of calmness. Traditional Tongkonan Houses cover the background with fascinating Toraja Patterns decorating the structures. Indonesian coffee has traditionally been processed with the Giling-Basah method, or wet-hulled like Sumatra. In 1976 TOARCO, a Japanese-Indonesian joint-venture, introduced to Sulawesi the traditional washed-process, similar to Central America. TOARCO owns Pedamaran Plantation at 900 – 1250 masl and purchases wet-parchment (at 40% moisture) from small producers at 1200 – 1800 masl. Coffee is trucked to Pedamaran Plantation immediately and coffee gets dried on patios at their mill facilities. If a producer wants to sell their parchment coffee to TOARCO they need to get certified to their standards as far as selective-picking, storage, transportation, moisture levels, etc. Farmers are issued ID cards that allow them to sell their coffee at various purchasing points in the Tana Toraja region during the market of the week. Café Imports’ coffee comes from small producers at the higher altitude areas. Most of the coffee produced in Tana Toraja is S795 variety, a Typica hybrid. This proves once again how important the variety translates in the cup. Indonesia has a great deal of Catimor, a Robusta-heavy x Arabica hybrid, but Tana Toraja has kept high-quality varieties. In 2010 Sulawesi received double the normal amount of rain reducing the crop of 2011 down 70% making it unavailable for that season. -Piero Cristiani
Sulawesi
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Microlot 2 PT TOARCO Tana Toraja - AA (GrainPro) 6602 60kg 67 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Tangy and herbaceous with a sweet cedar aftertaste. Tangy and herbaceous with a sweet cedar aftertaste. For pictures click here Sulawesi (Celebes), was influenced and controlled by the Netherlands from 1605 until World War II. In 1669 the Dutch East India Company took control of the trade in Sulawesi. The Dutch built Fort Rotterdam in Ujung Pandang (now Makassar) in the mid 1600’s and not until 1905 they finally gained control of the whole island becoming part of the Dutch state colony of the Netherlands East Indies. The Dutch East India Company was in control of coffee production in Indonesia during most the 1700’s and introduced Arabica Coffee (Typica) to Sulawesi in 1750. It took some time to arrive to Tana Toraja, Sulawesi from Minneapolis. Minneapolis – Tokyo – Singapore – Jakarta – Makassar and drive 8 hours north to Rantepao, Tana Toraja. It is the most beautiful place on earth. It’s green, lush, rice paddies everywhere—giving it a sense of calmness. Traditional Tongkonan Houses cover the background with fascinating Toraja Patterns decorating the structures. Indonesian coffee has traditionally been processed with the Giling-Basah method, or wet-hulled like Sumatra. In 1976 TOARCO, a Japanese-Indonesian joint-venture, introduced to Sulawesi the traditional washed-process, similar to Central America. TOARCO owns Pedamaran Plantation at 900 – 1250 masl and purchases wet-parchment (at 40% moisture) from small producers at 1200 – 1800 masl. Coffee is trucked to Pedamaran Plantation immediately and coffee gets dried on patios at their mill facilities. If a producer wants to sell their parchment coffee to TOARCO they need to get certified to their standards as far as selective-picking, storage, transportation, moisture levels, etc. Farmers are issued ID cards that allow them to sell their coffee at various purchasing points in the Tana Toraja region during the market of the week. Café Imports’ coffee comes from small producers at the higher altitude areas. Most of the coffee produced in Tana Toraja is S795 variety, a Typica hybrid. This proves once again how important the variety translates in the cup. Indonesia has a great deal of Catimor, a Robusta-heavy x Arabica hybrid, but Tana Toraja has kept high-quality varieties. In 2010 Sulawesi received double the normal amount of rain reducing the crop of 2011 down 70% making it unavailable for that season. -Piero Cristiani
Sulawesi
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Microlot 2 PT TOARCO Tana Toraja - PB (GrainPro) 6606 60kg 1 Eniti Limited UK london-eu Toffee, lime, spices and nut. Toffee, lime, spices and nut. For pictures click here Sulawesi (Celebes), was influenced and controlled by the Netherlands from 1605 until World War II. In 1669 the Dutch East India Company took control of the trade in Sulawesi. The Dutch built Fort Rotterdam in Ujung Pandang (now Makassar) in the mid 1600’s and not until 1905 they finally gained control of the whole island becoming part of the Dutch state colony of the Netherlands East Indies. The Dutch East India Company was in control of coffee production in Indonesia during most the 1700’s and introduced Arabica Coffee (Typica) to Sulawesi in 1750. It took some time to arrive to Tana Toraja, Sulawesi from Minneapolis. Minneapolis – Tokyo – Singapore – Jakarta – Makassar and drive 8 hours north to Rantepao, Tana Toraja. It is the most beautiful place on earth. It’s green, lush, rice paddies everywhere—giving it a sense of calmness. Traditional Tongkonan Houses cover the background with fascinating Toraja Patterns decorating the structures. Indonesian coffee has traditionally been processed with the Giling-Basah method, or wet-hulled like Sumatra. In 1976 TOARCO, a Japanese-Indonesian joint-venture, introduced to Sulawesi the traditional washed-process, similar to Central America. TOARCO owns Pedamaran Plantation at 900 – 1250 masl and purchases wet-parchment (at 40% moisture) from small producers at 1200 – 1800 masl. Coffee is trucked to Pedamaran Plantation immediately and coffee gets dried on patios at their mill facilities. If a producer wants to sell their parchment coffee to TOARCO they need to get certified to their standards as far as selective-picking, storage, transportation, moisture levels, etc. Farmers are issued ID cards that allow them to sell their coffee at various purchasing points in the Tana Toraja region during the market of the week. Café Imports’ coffee comes from small producers at the higher altitude areas. Most of the coffee produced in Tana Toraja is S795 variety, a Typica hybrid. This proves once again how important the variety translates in the cup. Indonesia has a great deal of Catimor, a Robusta-heavy x Arabica hybrid, but Tana Toraja has kept high-quality varieties. In 2010 Sulawesi received double the normal amount of rain reducing the crop of 2011 down 70% making it unavailable for that season. -Piero Cristiani
Sulawesi
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Microlot 2 PT TOARCO Tana Toraja - AA (GrainPro) 6611 60kg 83 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Cane juice and green grape flavors with tangy acidity and a mellow aftertaste. Cane juice and green grape flavors with tangy acidity and a mellow aftertaste. For pictures click here Sulawesi (Celebes), was influenced and controlled by the Netherlands from 1605 until World War II.  In 1669 the Dutch East India Company took control of the trade in Sulawesi.  The Dutch built Fort Rotterdam in Ujung Pandang (now Makassar) in the mid 1600’s and not until 1905 they finally gained control of the whole island becoming part of the Dutch state colony of the Netherlands East Indies.  The Dutch East India Company was in control of coffee production in Indonesia during most the 1700’s and introduced Arabica Coffee (Typica) to Sulawesi in 1750. It took some time to arrive to Tana Toraja, Sulawesi from Minneapolis.  Minneapolis – Tokyo – Singapore – Jakarta – Makassar and drive 8 hours north to Rantepao, Tana Toraja.  It is the most beautiful place on earth.  It’s green, lush, rice paddies everywhere—giving it a sense of calmness.  Traditional Tongkonan Houses cover the background with fascinating Toraja Patterns decorating the structures. Indonesian coffee has traditionally been processed with the Giling-Basah method, or wet-hulled like Sumatra.  In 1976 TOARCO, a Japanese-Indonesian joint-venture, introduced to Sulawesi the traditional washed-process, similar to Central America.  TOARCO owns Pedamaran Plantation at 900 – 1250 masl and purchases wet-parchment (at 40% moisture) from small producers at 1200 – 1800 masl.  Coffee is trucked to Pedamaran Plantation immediately and coffee gets dried on patios at their mill facilities.  If a producer wants to sell their parchment coffee to TOARCO they need to get certified to their standards as far as selective-picking, storage, transportation, moisture levels, etc.  Farmers are issued ID cards that allow them to sell their coffee at various purchasing points in the Tana Toraja region during the market of the week.  Café Imports’ coffee comes from small producers at the higher altitude areas. Most of the coffee produced in Tana Toraja is S795 variety, a Typica hybrid.  This proves once again how important the variety translates in the cup.  Indonesia has a great deal of Catimor, a Robusta-heavy x Arabica hybrid, but Tana Toraja has kept high-quality varieties. In 2010 Sulawesi received double the normal amount of rain reducing the crop of 2011 down 70% making it unavailable for that season.  -Piero Cristiani
Sulawesi
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Microlot 2 PT TOARCO Tana Toraja - PB (GrainPro) 6612 60kg 28 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Rich and tangy with milk chocolate and cinnamon flavors and a mild herbaceous aftertaste. Rich and tangy with milk chocolate and cinnamon flavors and a mild herbaceous aftertaste. For pictures click here Sulawesi (Celebes), was influenced and controlled by the Netherlands from 1605 until World War II. In 1669 the Dutch East India Company took control of the trade in Sulawesi. The Dutch built Fort Rotterdam in Ujung Pandang (now Makassar) in the mid 1600’s and not until 1905 they finally gained control of the whole island becoming part of the Dutch state colony of the Netherlands East Indies. The Dutch East India Company was in control of coffee production in Indonesia during most the 1700’s and introduced Arabica Coffee (Typica) to Sulawesi in 1750. It took some time to arrive to Tana Toraja, Sulawesi from Minneapolis. Minneapolis – Tokyo – Singapore – Jakarta – Makassar and drive 8 hours north to Rantepao, Tana Toraja. It is the most beautiful place on earth. It’s green, lush, rice paddies everywhere—giving it a sense of calmness. Traditional Tongkonan Houses cover the background with fascinating Toraja Patterns decorating the structures. Indonesian coffee has traditionally been processed with the Giling-Basah method, or wet-hulled like Sumatra. In 1976 TOARCO, a Japanese-Indonesian joint-venture, introduced to Sulawesi the traditional washed-process, similar to Central America. TOARCO owns Pedamaran Plantation at 900 – 1250 masl and purchases wet-parchment (at 40% moisture) from small producers at 1200 – 1800 masl. Coffee is trucked to Pedamaran Plantation immediately and coffee gets dried on patios at their mill facilities. If a producer wants to sell their parchment coffee to TOARCO they need to get certified to their standards as far as selective-picking, storage, transportation, moisture levels, etc. Farmers are issued ID cards that allow them to sell their coffee at various purchasing points in the Tana Toraja region during the market of the week. Café Imports’ coffee comes from small producers at the higher altitude areas. Most of the coffee produced in Tana Toraja is S795 variety, a Typica hybrid. This proves once again how important the variety translates in the cup. Indonesia has a great deal of Catimor, a Robusta-heavy x Arabica hybrid, but Tana Toraja has kept high-quality varieties. In 2010 Sulawesi received double the normal amount of rain reducing the crop of 2011 down 70% making it unavailable for that season. -Piero Cristiani
Sulawesi
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Special Category 100 PT TOARCO Tana Toraja - A (GrainPro)(PC) 5532 60kg 3 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Savory, vegetal with citric acidity. Savory, vegetal with citric acidity. For pictures click here Sulawesi (Celebes), was influenced and controlled by the Netherlands from 1605 until World War II. In 1669 the Dutch East India Company took control of the trade in Sulawesi. The Dutch built Fort Rotterdam in Ujung Pandang (now Makassar) in the mid 1600’s and not until 1905 they finally gained control of the whole island becoming part of the Dutch state colony of the Netherlands East Indies. The Dutch East India Company was in control of coffee production in Indonesia during most the 1700’s and introduced Arabica Coffee (Typica) to Sulawesi in 1750. It took some time to arrive to Tana Toraja, Sulawesi from Minneapolis. Minneapolis – Tokyo – Singapore – Jakarta – Makassar and drive 8 hours north to Rantepao, Tana Toraja. It is the most beautiful place on earth. It’s green, lush, rice paddies everywhere—giving it a sense of calmness. Traditional Tongkonan Houses cover the background with fascinating Toraja Patterns decorating the structures. Indonesian coffee has traditionally been processed with the Giling-Basah method, or wet-hulled like Sumatra. In 1976 TOARCO, a Japanese-Indonesian joint-venture, introduced to Sulawesi the traditional washed-process, similar to Central America. TOARCO owns Pedamaran Plantation at 900 – 1250 masl and purchases wet-parchment (at 40% moisture) from small producers at 1200 – 1800 masl. Coffee is trucked to Pedamaran Plantation immediately and coffee gets dried on patios at their mill facilities. If a producer wants to sell their parchment coffee to TOARCO they need to get certified to their standards as far as selective-picking, storage, transportation, moisture levels, etc. Farmers are issued ID cards that allow them to sell their coffee at various purchasing points in the Tana Toraja region during the market of the week. Café Imports’ coffee comes from small producers at the higher altitude areas. Most of the coffee produced in Tana Toraja is S795 variety, a Typica hybrid. This proves once again how important the variety translates in the cup. Indonesia has a great deal of Catimor, a Robusta-heavy x Arabica hybrid, but Tana Toraja has kept high-quality varieties. In 2010 Sulawesi received double the normal amount of rain reducing the crop of 2011 down 70% making it unavailable for that season. -Piero Cristiani
Sumatra
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Decaf KVW MC Decaf - Non FT or Org Mandheling 6961 60kg 4 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Pine and mesquite.
Sumatra
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Decaf KVW MC Decaf - Non FT or Org Mandheling 7163 60kg 31 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us toffee and citric.
Sumatra
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FTO Mandheling DP Fair Trade Organic Gayo Megah Bersiri FLO ID 28568 6575 60kg 250 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Clean with tangy acidity, chocolate, citrus and cherry tomato. Clean with tangy acidity, chocolate, citrus and cherry tomato. Gayo and Javanese women work together under the shade coverings as they hand sort beans from the villiages near Takegon.  Most of these women are widows from the Free Aceh conflict that only ended in 2005.  Hopefully this aides in the healing of this troubled region that was also devastated by the Tsunami on the twenty sixth of December 2004, as Cooperative Megah Berseri provides not only an income but also company and hope.
Sumatra
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FTO Mandheling DP Fair Trade Organic Gayo Mandiri - FLO ID 22710 6673 60kg 310 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Heavy with lemon, chocolate and wood. Heavy with lemon, chocolate and wood. KSU Gayo Mandiri was established on November 2008 by the Ministry of Cooperatives, and in the present days counts with 1294 members. The coffee production is done by the cooperative members and commercialized by the cooperative. In the pursuit of quality, KSU has implemented new teaching and consulting strategies to help the producers to achieve better quality. The cooperative facilitate the know how of the usage of organic fertilizers among the producers. Gayo and Javanese women work together under the shade coverings as they hand sort beans from the villiages near Takegon. Mostof these women are widows from the Free Aceh conflict that only ended in 2005. Hopefully this aides in the healing of this troubled region that was also devastated by the Tsunami on the twenty sixth of December 2004 The cooperative has been developing an area of 100 hectares for Arabica production, which will start to produce in early 2015.
Sumatra
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FTO Mandheling DP Fair Trade Organic Gayo Mandiri - FLO ID 22710 6674 60kg 29 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Creamy with citric acidity, floral and green pepper flavor. Creamy with citric acidity, floral and green pepper flavor. KSU Gayo Mandiri was established on November 2008 by the Ministry of Cooperatives, and in the present days counts with 1294 members. The coffee production is done by the cooperative members and commercialized by the cooperative. In the pursuit of quality, KSU has implemented new teaching and consulting strategies to help the producers to achieve better quality. The cooperative facilitate the know how of the usage of organic fertilizers among the producers. Gayo and Javanese women work together under the shade coverings as they hand sort beans from the villiages near Takegon. Mostof these women are widows from the Free Aceh conflict that only ended in 2005. Hopefully this aides in the healing of this troubled region that was also devastated by the Tsunami on the twenty sixth of December 2004 The cooperative has been developing an area of 100 hectares for Arabica production, which will start to produce in early 2015.
Sumatra
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FTO Mandheling DP Fair Trade Organic Grade 1 7337 60kg 89 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Herbaceous, green pepper and nutty with good citric acidity.
Sumatra Mandheling DP Harimau Tiger 6675 60kg 263 AFLOAT afloat Sweet and thick with good citric acidity, caramel and some earthiness. Sweet and thick with good citric acidity, caramel and some earthiness. Sumatran coffees capture the wild jungle essence of this tropical Indonesian island. We cup Sumatran after Sumatran to find that earthy, deep, complex, full-bodied coffee that exhibits low-acidity smoothness and a touch of forest floor funk. A great Sumatran is creamy, sweet, with a touch of butterscotch, spice, and mustiness. (Yes, mustiness, not jungle rot. This is where cupping Sumatran after Sumatran pays off Big!) Sumatran coffee is a beautiful deep blue-green color with the appearance of jade. There is a tendency to over roast Sumatrans (along with other dry processed wild coffees) as they do not show much roast color, and roast unevenly. Sometimes the beans will look uneven and funky green. This is not a problem, however, or a sign of bad beans. Quality in the cup is what matters, or should matter, not mere appearance of beans. Sumatran coffees are hand sorted, and come in single-picked, double- picked, and even triple-picked lots. Since Sumatran's are dry processed and often laid out to dry on the dirt in small villages, sorting the coffee is essential to take out the sticks and stones that the beans inevitably acquire, but triple picking does not necessarily improve the quality of cup. In fact, we sometimes find that over-picked beautiful polished coffees are sometimes bland in the cup.
Sumatra Mandheling DP Grade 1 6879 60kg 320 AFLOAT   afloat
Sumatra Mandheling DP Harimau Tiger 7033 60kg 310 AFLOAT afloat Clean earth and cedar, buttermilk, smooth and citric. Clean earth and cedar, buttermilk, smooth and citric. Sumatran coffees capture the wild jungle essence of this tropical Indonesian island. We cup Sumatran after Sumatran to find that earthy, deep, complex, full-bodied coffee that exhibits low-acidity smoothness and a touch of forest floor funk. A great Sumatran is creamy, sweet, with a touch of butterscotch, spice, and mustiness. (Yes, mustiness, not jungle rot. This is where cupping Sumatran after Sumatran pays off Big!) Sumatran coffee is a beautiful deep blue-green color with the appearance of jade. There is a tendency to over roast Sumatrans (along with other dry processed wild coffees) as they do not show much roast color, and roast unevenly. Sometimes the beans will look uneven and funky green. This is not a problem, however, or a sign of bad beans. Quality in the cup is what matters, or should matter, not mere appearance of beans. Sumatran coffees are hand sorted, and come in single-picked, double- picked, and even triple-picked lots. Since Sumatran's are dry processed and often laid out to dry on the dirt in small villages, sorting the coffee is essential to take out the sticks and stones that the beans inevitably acquire, but triple picking does not necessarily improve the quality of cup. In fact, we sometimes find that over-picked beautiful polished coffees are sometimes bland in the cup.
Sumatra Mandheling DP Harimau Tiger 7129 60kg 281 AFLOAT afloat Soft, sweet and citric with chocolate and cooked buttered vegetables. Soft, sweet and citric with chocolate and cooked buttered vegetables. Sumatran coffees capture the wild jungle essence of this tropical Indonesian island. We cup Sumatran after Sumatran to find that earthy, deep, complex, full-bodied coffee that exhibits low-acidity smoothness and a touch of forest floor funk. A great Sumatran is creamy, sweet, with a touch of butterscotch, spice, and mustiness. (Yes, mustiness, not jungle rot. This is where cupping Sumatran after Sumatran pays off Big!) Sumatran coffee is a beautiful deep blue-green color with the appearance of jade. There is a tendency to over roast Sumatrans (along with other dry processed wild coffees) as they do not show much roast color, and roast unevenly. Sometimes the beans will look uneven and funky green. This is not a problem, however, or a sign of bad beans. Quality in the cup is what matters, or should matter, not mere appearance of beans. Sumatran coffees are hand sorted, and come in single-picked, double- picked, and even triple-picked lots. Since Sumatran's are dry processed and often laid out to dry on the dirt in small villages, sorting the coffee is essential to take out the sticks and stones that the beans inevitably acquire, but triple picking does not necessarily improve the quality of cup. In fact, we sometimes find that over-picked beautiful polished coffees are sometimes bland in the cup.
Sumatra Mandheling DP Harimau Tiger 7130 60kg 300 OPEN origin Sumatran coffees capture the wild jungle essence of this tropical Indonesian island. We cup Sumatran after Sumatran to find that earthy, deep, complex, full-bodied coffee that exhibits low-acidity smoothness and a touch of forest floor funk. A great Sumatran is creamy, sweet, with a touch of butterscotch, spice, and mustiness. (Yes, mustiness, not jungle rot. This is where cupping Sumatran after Sumatran pays off Big!) Sumatran coffee is a beautiful deep blue-green color with the appearance of jade. There is a tendency to over roast Sumatrans (along with other dry processed wild coffees) as they do not show much roast color, and roast unevenly. Sometimes the beans will look uneven and funky green. This is not a problem, however, or a sign of bad beans. Quality in the cup is what matters, or should matter, not mere appearance of beans. Sumatran coffees are hand sorted, and come in single-picked, double- picked, and even triple-picked lots. Since Sumatran's are dry processed and often laid out to dry on the dirt in small villages, sorting the coffee is essential to take out the sticks and stones that the beans inevitably acquire, but triple picking does not necessarily improve the quality of cup. In fact, we sometimes find that over-picked beautiful polished coffees are sometimes bland in the cup.
Sumatra
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Mandheling DP   7215 60kg 9 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Lemon and chocolate with a heavy, smooth mouthfeel.
Sumatra Mandheling DP Grade 1 7445 60kg 300 OPEN   origin
Sumatra
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Spl Cat 400 Absynia - Sabri 6260 60kg 1 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Herbal, toffee. Herbal, toffee. Last November we set out to Sumatra to answer a question: Is it possible to find high end micro lots in Sumatra? We have been cupping good and very good container lots, and also had a single cherry selection lot that was very good for us last year. In fact, it was that cherry selected lot that finally instigated our trip. Now, if you were to boil down the challenges facing high end micro lot production in Sumatra to a single word, it would be exactly that: selection. At every link in the chain of production, selection in some form emerges as a weak point. One of the key areas here, unique to Sumatra, has to do with the structural form of the Sumatran coffee trade. In Sumatra, farmers sell to Collectors, who then sell to coops or exporters. Processing is performed to some extent by all three, and the extra exchange by a person who is essentially a broker on a very local level renders any selection that a farmer might do null, and any that a coop or exporter might want to do meaningless. Full stop… almost… He was able to identify varieties by cherry and by plant where other farmers that we met with could not. that He had never been asked to separate lots before. His response just goes to underscore the infrastructural and logistical challenges to selection and separation in Sumatran coffee. This is why Sumatran coffee has historically always been regionally marketed- Mandheling, Lintong, or even sub-regionally with the “Blue Batak” and “Lake Tawar” marks. In January we received pre-shipment samples representing both a single farm, single variety Bourbon lot and another Absynia lot. Fast-forward, we just finished our second spot cupping in two days of each earlier this afternoon. Sabri is doing selective picking of the cherries and the results are shown in exceptional cup quality we are getting. To read more about Sumatran coffee click here. The photos show an Absynia coffee tree. Is possible to distinguish the characteristics of this variety, the green cherry has a matte green color, narrow discshown in the bottom of the cherry.
Sumatra
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Spl Cat 400 Absynia - Sabri 6478 60kg 5 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Juicy, soft and clean with caramel, fruit and some herb flavor. Juicy, soft and clean with caramel, fruit and some herb flavor. Last November we set out to Sumatra to answer a question: Is it possible to find high end micro lots in Sumatra? We have been cupping good and very good container lots, and also had a single cherry selection lot that was very good for us last year. In fact, it was that cherry selected lot that finally instigated our trip. Now, if you were to boil down the challenges facing high end micro lot production in Sumatra to a single word, it would be exactly that: selection. At every link in the chain of production, selection in some form emerges as a weak point. One of the key areas here, unique to Sumatra, has to do with the structural form of the Sumatran coffee trade. In Sumatra, farmers sell to Collectors, who then sell to coops or exporters. Processing is performed to some extent by all three, and the extra exchange by a person who is essentially a broker on a very local level renders any selection that a farmer might do null, and any that a coop or exporter might want to do meaningless. Full stop… almost… He was able to identify varieties by cherry and by plant where other farmers that we met with could not. that He had never been asked to separate lots before. His response just goes to underscore the infrastructural and logistical challenges to selection and separation in Sumatran coffee. This is why Sumatran coffee has historically always been regionally marketed- Mandheling, Lintong, or even sub-regionally with the “Blue Batak” and “Lake Tawar” marks. In January we received pre-shipment samples representing both a single farm, single variety Bourbon lot and another Absynia lot. Fast-forward, we just finished our second spot cupping in two days of each earlier this afternoon. Sabri is doing selective picking of the cherries and the results are shown in exceptional cup quality we are getting. To read more about Sumatran coffee click here. The photos show an Absynia coffee tree. Is possible to distinguish the characteristics of this variety, the green cherry has a matte green color, narrow discshown in the bottom of the cherry.
Sumatra Spl Cat 400 Absynia - Sabri 7391 60kg 24 OPEN origin Last November we set out to Sumatra to answer a question: Is it possible to find high end micro lots in Sumatra? We have been cupping good and very good container lots, and also had a single cherry selection lot that was very good for us last year. In fact, it was that cherry selected lot that finally instigated our trip. Now, if you were to boil down the challenges facing high end micro lot production in Sumatra to a single word, it would be exactly that: selection. At every link in the chain of production, selection in some form emerges as a weak point. One of the key areas here, unique to Sumatra, has to do with the structural form of the Sumatran coffee trade. In Sumatra, farmers sell to Collectors, who then sell to coops or exporters. Processing is performed to some extent by all three, and the extra exchange by a person who is essentially a broker on a very local level renders any selection that a farmer might do null, and any that a coop or exporter might want to do meaningless. Full stop… almost… He was able to identify varieties by cherry and by plant where other farmers that we met with could not. that He had never been asked to separate lots before. His response just goes to underscore the infrastructural and logistical challenges to selection and separation in Sumatran coffee. This is why Sumatran coffee has historically always been regionally marketed- Mandheling, Lintong, or even sub-regionally with the “Blue Batak” and “Lake Tawar” marks. In January we received pre-shipment samples representing both a single farm, single variety Bourbon lot and another Absynia lot. Fast-forward, we just finished our second spot cupping in two days of each earlier this afternoon. Sabri is doing selective picking of the cherries and the results are shown in exceptional cup quality we are getting. To read more about Sumatran coffee click here. The photos show an Absynia coffee tree. Is possible to distinguish the characteristics of this variety, the green cherry has a matte green color, narrow discshown in the bottom of the cherry.
Sumatra Spl Cat 400 Bourbon - Sabri 7392 60kg 33 OPEN origin Last November we set out to Sumatra to answer a question: Is it possible to find high end micro lots in Sumatra? We have been cupping good and very good container lots, and also had a single cherry selection lot that was very good for us last year. In fact, it was that cherry selected lot that finally instigated our trip. Now, if you were to boil down the challenges facing high end micro lot production in Sumatra to a single word, it would be exactly that: selection. At every link in the chain of production, selection in some form emerges as a weak point. One of the key areas here, unique to Sumatra, has to do with the structural form of the Sumatran coffee trade. In Sumatra, farmers sell to Collectors, who then sell to coops or exporters. Processing is performed to some extent by all three, and the extra exchange by a person who is essentially a broker on a very local level renders any selection that a farmer might do null, and any that a coop or exporter might want to do meaningless. Full stop… almost… He was able to identify varieties by cherry and by plant where other farmers that we met with could not. that He had never been asked to separate lots before. His response just goes to underscore the infrastructural and logistical challenges to selection and separation in Sumatran coffee. This is why Sumatran coffee has historically always been regionally marketed- Mandheling, Lintong, or even sub-regionally with the “Blue Batak” and “Lake Tawar” marks. In January we received pre-shipment samples representing both a single farm, single variety Bourbon lot and another Absynia lot. Fast-forward, we just finished our second spot cupping in two days of each earlier this afternoon. Sabri is doing selective picking of the cherries and the results are shown in exceptional cup quality we are getting. To read more about Sumatran coffee click here.
Tanzania
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Washed Arabica Peaberry 6648 60kg 175 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Herbal and dark chocolate flavors with citric acidity. Herbal and dark chocolate flavors with citric acidity. The Jesuits introduced mild Arabica in the 1890’s, and by 1990 coffee was seen as a commercial venture on Mount Kilimanjaro. The first variety grown was Bourbon and later the Kent variety was produced. Coffee is processed either by the smallholder’s farm with a hand pulper or in the Central Processing Units (wet Mills) run by the estates, private companies or cooperatives. The ripe cherries are picked and taken for pulping the same day. After being washed, the coffee is stored in special fermentation tanks for 48 hours after which they are washed to remove the mucilage. The drying process is done on raised drying tables. Once the coffee reaches the desire moisture is transported to the dry mill. The producer can sell his or her coffee either directly to private companies or to cooperative unions through secondary parties. These entities take care of the drying mill and exportation process. Any unique systems or practices specific to the country? Tell us about them. (i.e. Micromills in Costa, Auction in Kenya): Tanzanian coffees are grown on the slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro, under the shade of banana trees, truly an exotic location for this east African coffee. Tanzanian coffee is somewhat similar to the coffee of its neighbor north of the border (Kenya for the geographically challenged), bright, clean and aggressively complex. The grading process in Tanzania is also the same as in Kenya, where it is graded on bean size, and AA is the largest, followed by A and B down the line. In the United States a very popular Tanzanian coffee is the peaberry variety. Why? Well, a couple of theories about that one. Peaberries seem to have a mystique about them. What's a peaberry? It's when a single bean develops inside the coffee cherry, instead of the familiar two "flat beans". Why so many fans of the peaberry? The theory is that all the goodness of the coffee cherry is in only one bean. Another reason for the popularity of Tanzanian peaberries is simply a factor of supply. The Japanese buy the bulk of Tanzania flatberries (regular coffee beans) and since the peaberries have been sorted out, a market was needed for the peaberries. Since peaberries have the cult following mentioned above, Viola! Exotic Tanzania Peaberries! Hence, with the exotic name (Tanzania) and the peaberry factor, we cup and cup to find those cups that truly deserve the praise, and are not just a function of the hype!
Tanzania
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Washed Arabica Kiboko Peaberry 6953 60kg 207 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Citric, fruit and cedar. Citric, fruit and cedar. The Jesuits introduced mild Arabica in the 1890’s, and by 1990 coffee was seen as a commercial venture on Mount Kilimanjaro. The first variety grown was Bourbon and later the Kent variety was produced. Coffee is processed either by the smallholder’s farm with a hand pulper or in the Central Processing Units (wet Mills) run by the estates, private companies or cooperatives. The ripe cherries are picked and taken for pulping the same day. After being washed, the coffee is stored in special fermentation tanks for 48 hours after which they are washed to remove the mucilage. The drying process is done on raised drying tables. Once the coffee reaches the desire moisture is transported to the dry mill. The producer can sell his or her coffee either directly to private companies or to cooperative unions through secondary parties. These entities take care of the drying mill and exportation process. Any unique systems or practices specific to the country? Tell us about them. (i.e. Micromills in Costa, Auction in Kenya): Tanzanian coffees are grown on the slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro, under the shade of banana trees, truly an exotic location for this east African coffee. Tanzanian coffee is somewhat similar to the coffee of its neighbor north of the border (Kenya for the geographically challenged), bright, clean and aggressively complex. The grading process in Tanzania is also the same as in Kenya, where it is graded on bean size, and AA is the largest, followed by A and B down the line. In the United States a very popular Tanzanian coffee is the peaberry variety. Why? Well, a couple of theories about that one. Peaberries seem to have a mystique about them. What's a peaberry? It's when a single bean develops inside the coffee cherry, instead of the familiar two "flat beans". Why so many fans of the peaberry? The theory is that all the goodness of the coffee cherry is in only one bean. Another reason for the popularity of Tanzanian peaberries is simply a factor of supply. The Japanese buy the bulk of Tanzania flatberries (regular coffee beans) and since the peaberries have been sorted out, a market was needed for the peaberries. Since peaberries have the cult following mentioned above, Viola! Exotic Tanzania Peaberries! Hence, with the exotic name (Tanzania) and the peaberry factor, we cup and cup to find those cups that truly deserve the praise, and are not just a function of the hype!
Yemen Special Category 400 Haraaz-Red Grade A+ 7012 64kg 58 OPEN origin Yemeni coffee is normally harvested from dried cherries picked straight from the tree. After the cherries are picked they are spread on rooftops or on sheets and allowed to dry even more of the next two to three weeks. When the coffee is ready to be exported, it is milled and away we go. Our Haraaz Red Marqaha is bought as ripe cherry from the farmer, not as dried raisons. This way, we know only the best ripest cherry is selected. Next, we dry it on raised beds and not on the traditional rooftop. This allows the perfect drying environment. You'll see it in the cup. My hope is that this coffee will be a single origin espresso at the WBC someday.
Yemen
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Special Category 500 Coffee Cherry Tea (Qisher Milled with Spices) 6171  kg 59 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Groups like Al-Hamdani are working to reverse this trend. Acting as a unified force of 32,000 farmers, this group makes much needed financing accessible to alleviate the seasonal nature of a coffee farmer's income. They also work to ensure high quality standards and assist in the process of milling and sorting dried cherries. In 2007, Al-Hamdani established a new dam to make irrigation available to the farmers in the region. We hope to see more farmers join together in movements like this that make the production of uniquehigh quality Yemeni coffees a financially viable reality. Coffee husks have a long history of being prepared for consumption aside from the roasted beans we're now so familiar with. In Central America, they bear the name Cascara. In Africa, it is called Buna. In the Arabic world, where this offering comes from, it goes by Qish'r or Qisher. Served hot or cold, the dried husk tea makes for a unique beverage that offers flavors both new and familiar to the coffee drinker. When our last Cascara offering came out, Education Expert, Sales Rep and Roasting Pro Joe Marrocco wrote this blogand included some awesome ideas for how to prepare different iterations of the dried coffee cherry tea. We invite you to try these, or create your own! The flavors can be easily guided in different directions with the addition of spices and sweeteners so experimentation almost always yields interesting results.
Yemen
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Special Category 500 Coffee Cherry Tea (Qisher Milled) 6172  kg 53 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Groups like Al-Hamdani are working to reverse this trend. Acting as a unified force of 32,000 farmers, this group makes much needed financing accessible to alleviate the seasonal nature of a coffee farmer's income. They also work to ensure high quality standards and assist in the process of milling and sorting dried cherries. In 2007, Al-Hamdani established a new dam to make irrigation available to the farmers in the region. We hope to see more farmers join together in movements like this that make the production of uniquehigh quality Yemeni coffees a financially viable reality. Coffee husks have a long history of being prepared for consumption aside from the roasted beans we're now so familiar with. In Central America, they bear the name Cascara. In Africa, it is called Buna. In the Arabic world, where this offering comes from, it goes by Qish'r or Qisher. Served hot or cold, the dried husk tea makes for a unique beverage that offers flavors both new and familiar to the coffee drinker. When our last Cascara offering came out, Education Expert, Sales Rep and Roasting Pro Joe Marrocco wrote this blogand included some awesome ideas for how to prepare different iterations of the dried coffee cherry tea. We invite you to try these, or create your own! The flavors can be easily guided in different directions with the addition of spices and sweeteners so experimentation almost always yields interesting results.
Yemen
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Special Category 500 Coffee Cherry Tea (Qisher Raw) 6173  kg 28 Cafe Imports Fulfillment LLC minnesota-us Groups like Al-Hamdani are working to reverse this trend. Acting as a unified force of 32,000 farmers, this group makes much needed financing accessible to alleviate the seasonal nature of a coffee farmer's income. They also work to ensure high quality standards and assist in the process of milling and sorting dried cherries. In 2007, Al-Hamdani established a new dam to make irrigation available to the farmers in the region. We hope to see more farmers join together in movements like this that make the production of uniquehigh quality Yemeni coffees a financially viable reality. Coffee husks have a long history of being prepared for consumption aside from the roasted beans we're now so familiar with. In Central America, they bear the name Cascara. In Africa, it is called Buna. In the Arabic world, where this offering comes from, it goes by Qish'r or Qisher. Served hot or cold, the dried husk tea makes for a unique beverage that offers flavors both new and familiar to the coffee drinker. When our last Cascara offering came out, Education Expert, Sales Rep and Roasting Pro Joe Marrocco wrote this blogand included some awesome ideas for how to prepare different iterations of the dried coffee cherry tea. We invite you to try these, or create your own! The flavors can be easily guided in different directions with the addition of spices and sweeteners so experimentation almost always yields interesting results.

Last Updated 02-27-15

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